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Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

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Tomorrow I will post a pic of the "bridge" that my solar panel forms across the sliding hatch runners. The solar panel forms the sea hood or "garage" for the hatch but there is a space between the forard end of the hatch and the panel when the hatch is closed, and this allowed a small spray of water to enter in a storm when towing. I am looking at ways to fix this very small problem.

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Amos, I don't plan on buying the Kit. I have the assembly instructions though, so I'd have to sort of invent my own plans. I am not sure if just the plans are available. I think for right now I'm going to wrap up the rest of the stuff topsides and flip the boat. I need to get moving!

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Here are two pics of my solar panel used as a garage for the long sliding hatch. I need to add a section between the panel and the closed hatch, or some other strategy to ensure that no water can be forced under the front of the hatch. I have made a cover for the panel to protect it when travelling and when rigging, just in case I drop a pair of pliers or something onto the glass top.

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Drew, I'm not sure what I'm seeing. Is that some kind of track (not wood) the hatches are running in? And it looks like maybe they are curved (not absolutely sure). I like the low profile. What would happen if the panel was just back farther?

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Amos, the runners are simply a length of hardwood with a track routed into each to take the side of the hatch. I simply wax it occasionally and it runs nice and smooth. The tracks are dead straight, the hatch has a curve upwards (slight dome). Across the front of the tracks near the forard tabernacle I have included a straight breakwater and the front end of the panel is screwed to that. I decided not to make it able to be angled to keep the cable run simple, although the rear mounts could easily act as hinges if I choose.

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I finished, just short of epoxy coating, the anchor locker. I bought a Manson Supreme Anchor on sale for an amazing deal awhile ago. These work pretty good in our waters. The great news is the 10 pounder fits easily through the anchor locker hatch. I my add a bit of protection along the sides where it may wear. I had already glassed the bottom.

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This morning, with the nice picture Alan posted on Drew's page, I worked out my hatch configuration. I'm making all the parts out of Spanish Cedar. Jazz hands isn't going to have a ton of woodwork, but the hatch trim and boards will be out of some Spanish Cedar I have laying around. This picture shows some scraps I laid up against the current opening and began my planning. I have almost scrap Okume to make all the hatches. 9mm is pretty rare around here, so I'll be making some myself by laminating 3mm to 6mm. I already laminated to 6mm pieces together for the main hatch.  I had just put my cement blocks away......had to get them back out.

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Fired up that Chick is back making chips, or at least planning to make chips......

 

 

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A layer (or two) of 12 ounce biax on the back of the 1/4" hatch cover will stiffen it up to rival 3/8" plywood. I'd also line that locker with some fabric too, maybe Xynole to make it especially tough, as anchors tend to be hard on things, as they bounce around and generally get dropped into place.

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Steve, I put some of that rubber mat with holes in it that you can buy from camping stores to use as a tent floor, about 3/8 inch thick on the bottom of the anchor well. I just remove it after each trip and hose it off and dry out the anchor well. To protect the top edge from the anchor chain I shaped a piece of rubber mat that I drape over the edge and hook onto my fairleads.

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Drew, I like the tip on the anchor floor mat. I already had a piece of that "foam" and it's already cut. Par. I am adding a bit of glass on the spots that will see contact on the hull side and tabernacle. And Amos, after I get the hull done (flip soon) I am going to glass the fore deck. I am just going to tape the cabin chines. If I had kids as young as yours I'd do what you did. My kids favorite saying after doing something silly (destructive) was "oopsies". I miss that.

 

Today's pictures.  More pics Monday as I think this weekend is a finish the hatch weekend. Not much going on.

 

Unlike a hair cut, you can put it back.......

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They make a goofy plastic lattice that is perfect for the bottom of areas like that anchor locker.

It emulates those lattices made from slats of wood, but in some durable injected plastic. Tough, easy to cut, drains well, and easy to remove and clean.

 

It works awesome in the bottom of a footwell, too...

 

Finish the hatch weekend? We are on the same weekend. :) The forward hatch I’m making just hinges, though, and the slider is rough and ready, so my work is WAY easier than yours.

 

Still. Hatch buds!

 

Your perseverance on this project is commendable and inspirational. This is an enormous amount of work to do around a full life, and especially a life that keeps offering “speed bumps”.

 

Thanks for this. Even if I rarely comment, I’ve been watching your build.

 

Just keep swimming...

 

Peace,

Robert

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On my DAYsailer, I have a portable LED system.  99% of the time, I’m home eating supper before the sun goes down.  But if I’m doing some twilight fishing, for example, these come out.  The mounts are already in place.  All I have to do is clip them into their mounting brackets (not the suction cups!), and turn them on.  If/when I get to doing some camp cruising, I’ll hoist a handheld lamp aloft.  I guess it all depends on how often you will use them.  Now, mind you, if I had a mark III, I might have to rethink my strategy.  But I’m trying to employ the KISS (Keep It Simple, Silsbe) method.

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Robert, I appreciate the shout out. But I think you put the jinx on me! I got the flu and had to take a break for my hatch progress while I puked and slept. This is the weekend!

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Nope. Jinxed us both. I ripped mine all apart and started afresh. It still very rough.

Of course, I didn’t get sick, but I have been this year, so we’re even. :)

 

Get better. 

 

Peace,

Robert

 

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Well my worst fear is upon me. With the announcement of Alan and Taylor's build in action, I better get moving. I'm on the three years Anniversary of picking up my kit! The race is on.

 

Anyway, I made some progress on the Hatch. I have some unique requirements. Because of the need to get this boat out of my basement, it needs to be completely removable. I decided since I was doing that I could lower the profile of Graham's design because I needn't worry about removing the "garage" top. I also widened the rails a bit so I could angle them back a bit. Yes it adds a tiny bit of weight, which I have been trying not to do anywhere, but I just like the look. I also carried the hatch retainers up to the top. My mind feels like these are a bit wide aesthetically.

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Every book on joinery I've read always talks about a "ship lap" joint. Finally I got to use one.

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I have a bit of work to do on the front hatch, but I'll be glad when this is over. I really wanted the flip to have happened by now.

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Last couple of weeks have been crazy. My two boys finished 3rd and 4th in the NYS Nordic (cross country) Ski Championships up at Gore Mountain. This was after my son Andrew one the local regional championship. And my daughter got inducted in the National Golden Key Honor Society at college. She's way smarter than me (Yes I'm bragging a bit....they are great kids). Being a supportive dad and a productive boat builder are sometimes at odds.

 

But there is progress! My hatch is kind of like Grahams, but with some liberties taken. I went with a different solar panel to keep weight lower and angled the "rails" a bit. This is partly because my hatch need to be completely removed to get the boat out of the basement. The lower solar panel also allowed me to taper the front hatch a bit. There is a bit more radius to be added, but her is what it looks like. The screws that came with the piano hinge are 3/4" and so once I get some 5/8" I'll be ready to call it close to finished. I just have to cut the coming pieces and fit them in. I'm going to steal Grahams secrets and make dogs live he did to keep it shut, but that is for a different day.  This hatch project was by far the most tinkering. I should have bought the hatch but I was thinking "How hard could this be?" But I learned some stuff and I think it came out quite good, so all is well. I still have to figure out what to do for the windows in the hatch boards, but that can wait.

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Tonight hopefully I can route the solar panel wires, and remove the whole thing. Time to flip! Any advice before I do this is appreciated.

 

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Awesome progress.  Wish I lived closer so I could help you with the flip.  Impressive build on the hatches; love the angle you put on the hatch rails.

 

We suspended the boat from its centerline and simply rotated it.  The boat seemed very strong suspended like this; we didn't hear any creaks or groans.

 

There are a couple of nuances to this approach (pretty obvious nuances, but I'll list them anyway!): 

 

1)  Before flipping the boat must be suspened high enough so the cabin clears the floor when it is rotated,
2)  The boat may swing slightly forward or aft as it is hoisted; the line attached to the bow eye may catch on the bow as it is rotated, all this depends on how you angle the lines and position the attachment points on your ceiling.

3)  The higher up the aft end of the boat is in its final resting postition, the better, as this gives you better headroom when you crawl under the boat to fillet, epoxy and paint the underside of the cabin top.

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Looks really great! If you have the headroom, the "Amos Method" is probably the best. I've used it on all of my previous builds up until Summer Breeze. That was back when I had a "real" shop. My garage here is he mountains doesn't have enough headroom to hang and roll, so four of us carried the Breeze outside and rolled her by muscle power.

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Steve, I really like your joinery - you do nice work. Something to be justifiably proud of. I used a similar method to Amos, with real success. Suspended the bow with a block and tackle to a crossbeam in the garage and used two sets of tackle at the stern. After raising the boat we just rolled her over "with a little help from my friends" as the Beatles used to sing! We also put a lot of packing on the floor so we could rest the boat when we needed to, and then put her down onto a frame that we had prepared beforehand and clamped to the boat. https://messing-about.com/forums/topic/9779-aussie-cs-20-35-dragonfly-2/?page=5 

 

 

 

 

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