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K4lmy

Bluejacket boats take a licken and come back for more

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I am up to my ears with my current build but admit to thinking about the next boat which will likely be a tender for ROSIE.  I will certainly take some of my kayaks and surfskis with me at times.  With 12 of them hanging in my shed I need my head examined to be thinking of another boat.  Years ago I built one of Danny Greens nesting dinghys called 2 bits  for my sailboat.  It was stolen the first time I used it so I got the opportunity to build another one! Anybody know the difference between the Cameleon and 2Bits design?  The nesting dinghy worked  great for years when I cruised and was easy to load on the foredeck with a whisker pole used as a hoist.  These powerboats don't have that option so some kind of hoist seems like a good idea.  I really like the one in the picture Tom posted.  Is that made from Aluminum tubing?  Anybody have an idea for a small mast that could also work as a steadying sail at anchor?

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I doubt that the crane in the photo is aluminum but you can ask Rick Lapp for better information. Most dinghys will be too heavy on a cantilever for aluminum and steel will be needed.  It is certainly possible to have a wood mast attached to the pilothouse bulkhead and use it for both a dinghy hoist and a steady sail.  Don't forget that the height of the mast can cause problems in some areas unless it is in a tabernacle  It will also need some guy wires unless it's very strong and heavy.  Flapp@evanhospital.com

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A Google search for " Danny Greens nesting dinghys called 2 bits " revealed:

Eventually, we found an address for Danny Greene (a naval architect and nesting dinghy pioneer) and requested plans for Two Bits or. For Pete's Sake. We learned these plans were no longer available. His designs had evolved over 20 years into the pram he called Chameleon. Chameleon is a nesting pram,10-feet.

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Tom- I have no experience with a boat like a Bluejacket or Outer Banks at anchor.  I spent years living at anchor on a heavy steel sailboat and always thought the behavior of a boat at anchor was under discussed.  A heavy boat with an all chain rode is hard to beat on the hook compared to a light weight boat on a nylon rode.  Since I don't really know what to expect from my OB, any insights from the BJ community are appreciated.  The reason I bring it up in this thread is I often think of a steadying sail / crane as a way to keep ROSIE well behaved on the hook.  Am I over thinking this or does it make sense given your experience?

Alex, thanks for checking out those nesting dingys.  For what it is worth, 2 Bits was a really good design that rowed fairly well and could handle lots of weight.  I also want to check out what Graham from B&B has cooked up. 

Ken

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On 4/11/2018 at 10:08 PM, Kennneee said:

Tom- I have no experience with a boat like a Bluejacket or Outer Banks at anchor.  I spent years living at anchor on a heavy steel sailboat and always thought the behavior of a boat at anchor was under discussed.  A heavy boat with an all chain rode is hard to beat on the hook compared to a light weight boat on a nylon rode.  Since I don't really know what to expect from my OB, any insights from the BJ community are appreciated.  The reason I bring it up in this thread is I often think of a steadying sail / crane as a way to keep ROSIE well behaved on the hook.  Am I over thinking this or does it make sense given your experience?

Alex, thanks for checking out those nesting dingys.  For what it is worth, 2 Bits was a really good design that rowed fairly well and could handle lots of weight.  I also want to check out what Graham from B&B has cooked up. 

Ken

 

Lots of boats like to sail around at anchor and I've had  a fair share of them.  Bluejackets like to swing around and maybe someone who has tried a steady sail can offer some results of that.  The lack of a keel and lots of above windage plus light weight all conspire to promote sailing about.  One sure way to prevent sailing about is to shift the anchor line tension off the bow.  I set the anchor and bend on a rolling hitch about 15 feet or so out from the bow.  This second line can be taken aft and pulled in enough to shift the bow off to one side.  This biases the anchor pull off center so the boat cannot pass through the neutral point of the normal swing.  How much offset is used will depend on the particular boat and other conditions.

 

In light wind conditions, I often anchor by the stern which will prevent sailing about as well as make for a quieter sleep.  Of course many use two separate anchors at an angle off the bow and is some cases where a shifting tidal current is expected, both bow and stern anchors may be necessary to keep your boat away from other in the anchorage.

 

 

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