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MikeLTour61

Marissa 18 Eco Build ~ PHOTOS~

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Great nice job Mike !.

 

I will topcoat when all the wood work is ready, but for sure its better to talk with the paint manufacturer as clt_capt suggested !

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Thanks for the info.  It sounds like Awlgrip prefers to have the primer cured and sanded prior to topcoat.  I'm going to go the route that Dale did.  In fact, I'm going with mostly the same colors he used.  Anyway, I'll probably prime prior to flipping and then topcoat after all the other work is done and I've scuffed up the primer.

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Latest update:  Found a little more fairing work that needed to be done so I finished that.  I drilled the holes for the transom bilge drains.  Made the uprights for the cradles.  Applied the first of two coats of epoxy over the finished hull exterior.

 

Primer is on order and should be in a few days.

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Some of the sanding exposed the glass in some areas.  It didn't go through but I didn't want to chance the mesh pattern bleeding through the primer.  Also, the fairing compound is quite soft compared to epoxy.  You can dent it with your fingernail if it was mixed very thick.  I want to prevent dents as much as possible.  Plus -  it seemed like a good idea at the time.

 

On the down side...  First, I'm not very skilled in applying epoxy.  Most of the evolutions that I'm going through are the first time for me.  I used a foam roller to apply the epoxy and it's hard to judge how thick it's actually being applied.  I ended up with several runs and bubbles which I'm in the process of sanding out.  In the end, I'm hoping for a hard, fair surface for applying the finish.

 

On the up side, I found a few minor areas that could use a little more fairing that I wouldn't have found if there wasn't shiny epoxy to highlight those spots.  My plan is to complete sanding, fair the few spots that need it and then go over again with a THIN coat of epoxy.  I'm thinking of applying with a foam roller and then use a spreader to move it around and get it even and thin.  Based on how much epoxy I used on the last go-round, I'm thinking a quart will do the trick this time.

 

I'm definitely open to suggestions on this.  Like I said, I'm new to the finer points of fairing and finishing a hull.

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Mike,

The best thing I have found to remove epoxy runs, bubbles, etc. is one of those Japanese files that are made out of what looks like crossed hacksaw blades.  They are wonderful.  Get one with the handle that is offset so you can file on flat surfaces.

dale

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I have the 60 Merc on mine and it is propped with the largest size, lowest pitch 3 blade prop I could get. She will run in the low 30s in glassy water 33-34, which exceeds hull speed anyway.

 

She jumps out of the water, cruises 17-24mph uses about 1.3gal/hr in mixed use. The boat does seem a little tail heavy and I plan to add 50lb or so to the anchor locker this winter. 

 

The 60 weighs 40lb more than the 40HP to my recollection. But the 50 and 60HP are the same block in the MERCs.

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Thanks all for the advice.  Dale, I have those Shinto Saw Rasps  and they are great!  I also have some of the 3M guide coat (black powder) left over from a car restoration.  I broke it out the other day and started using it.  It really helps find the dimples and low spots without having to remove the primer that would normally be used in a primer guide coat application.

 

One thing that I thought of when building my shop was to put a floor drain in.  I didn't do it and have regretted it many times since.  I guess I could just let the water run onto the floor but it makes such a mess.  I think that's what I'll end up doing though.  Maybe break out the wet/dry vac and clean the shop floor while I'm at it :).

 

Now that I'm progressing toward flipping the boat, I'm starting to think about trailers.  I considered building one so I started pricing the parts I would need.  The total quickly went over $1500 and that's not counting the steel, nuts and bolts or paint.  I have a wire-feed welder so I have that expense covered.

 

For $2500 I should be able to buy a galvanized trailer with brakes, no?  Lotus built a great trailer but he lives very close to the water so it didn't need suspension, etc.  I really like the way his hull supports work.  If I built a trailer, it would be like his but with springs, etc.

 

I'll be traveling all over with mine so I need something with brakes and suspension.  I'd like a swing-away tongue so aluminum is not really an option in terms of material. 

 

Does anyone have and experience or ideas building their own trailer vs. buying one ready-made?  How about anyone who has bought a trailer for the Marrissa?  Any thoughts on brands, models, etc?

 

Thanks again!  This forum is a great thing!  I'm so glad Al Gore invented the internet. :rolleyes:

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The B&B website says it will weigh 1050 - 1150 # including motor and normal gear.  I'm guessing that's a 25hp motor.  I'll be using a 40 or 50 but that shouldn't add too much.  I'm sure it will end up below the weight required for trailer brakes.

 

The desire for brakes on the trailer isn't so much about being legal as not wanting to jackknife if I have to slam on the brakes.  If it costs $400 for brakes (which is what I'm hearing), I consider it a good deal.  I'd rather spend the bucks than to see my boat swing along side me in a panic stop. :o

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I have a Continental hot dipped galvanized trailer.  I paid just under $1700 for it brand new.  I am remembering it is a 17' foot but may be an 18'

 

I don't think you need brakes on a trailer and boat combination as light as the Marissa.

 

Also, by adding brakes you are adding more weight.  You want to be careful not to have the trailer and springs too big for the weight of the boat so as not to beat the boat up. At least that is what I have been told.

 

I tow my 'Salty' with a Subaru Forester and have had no problem in flat Florida.

 

I have attached a photo of the boat and trailer.

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Thanks for the info Dale.  Since you and others have said that brakes are unnecessary, I'll go without.  All the boat trailers I've had until now have had brakes but this is a smaller and much lighter boat . 

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Hi Gordy,

 

Well yes you did because I have not gotten around to it.

 

I have discovered a basic problem with myself.  I procrastinate.  I am waiting for all the women with the bikinis to show up.  So far this old man is still waiting. When they do, I will definitely record it for you all to view.

 

Right now, I am tied up with 'Lively' (CS 17) in my garage for a re-do of varnish, paint, re-rig, etc.

 

dale

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Latest update:

 

I got all the fairing done (for real this time) and the final coat of epoxy sanded down to 100 grit.  Washed the hull and after it dried, wiped it down with the fancy Awlgrip prep solvent.  Then finally applied the first coat of primer.  The Awlgrip primer hides VERY well but it's hard to keep a wet edge for roll and tip.  Seems to dry too fast.  In my experience, primer is a pain to work with and I wasn't disappointed.

 

I bought some Redtree foam rollers from Jamestown Distributors and within 5 minutes, the first roller started falling apart.  Had better luck with the second but for the money, I would think they could stand up to anything.

 

This week, I'll sand the first coat of primer and apply the second.  I may paint the bottom before I flip.  I haven't decided yet.  I'm thinking of installing a through-hull depth finder so I might hold off on the paint until after that.

 

 

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 The Awlgrip primer hides VERY well but it's hard to keep a wet edge for roll and tip.  Seems to dry too fast.  In my experience, primer is a pain to work with and I wasn't disappointed.

 

I never bother tipping the primer.  The goal is to build up a film thick enough to sand down to smooth and still have some left.  I brush it into corners and such and just roll it everywhere I can.  545 is very easy to sand within a couple days of putting it down.  Do not wait too many days before sanding!

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