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MikeLTour61

Marissa 18 Eco Build ~ PHOTOS~

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I don't think I have a picture of the motor well, I am going down to Darien Ga. next week and I could take a picture then. It does need a hole for the steering shaft to go through about the same size as the hole on the starboard side, I used the same rubber sleeve as the one used to seal the hole where the steering cable comes through to seal the hole. I think Graham made a neater one by using a piece of plastic pipe the right size and a cap on the end on the port side.

Hope that helps, thanks for the complement about my Marissa. I brought her to last year's mess a bout and Graham took some great pictures of her at speed.

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Hi All,

 

A few more photo updates...

 

I finished the inwales which turned out not to be as bad as I thought.  As Graham suggested, I didn't put quite as much twist in them where they meet the stem and planed the excess.  It's now fair and most of the meat is still there.

 

I also got one of the side panels installed.  I'm working alone so I installed guide pins (10d nails) once I got the panel where I wanted it.  You just HAVE to remove them after securing with screws or they will be epoxied in place.  It made the install a breeze once you know the panel is in the right place.

 

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Great nice work Mike ! I like the way you twisted the gunwales, looks very fine .

 

Are those  screws on the sides temporary  ?

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Thanks Lotus!  Yes, they're temporary... just sheetrock screws.  I used 1" in the stringers so they wouldn't punch holes though and cause more work on the inside.

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Dose anyone tried a tee top on a Marissa ??. These type of tents are not common in Malta, in fact I have never noticed a boat with it in my country .

 

 

I really like its style and I like the fact that there will be no obstructions on the deck .

 

What are the advantages and disadvantages  ?

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Hi All,

 

A few more photo updates...

 

I finished the inwales which turned out not to be as bad as I thought.  As Graham suggested, I didn't put quite as much twist in them where they meet the stem and planed the excess.  It's now fair and most of the meat is still there.

 

I also got one of the side panels installed.  I'm working alone so I installed guide pins (10d nails) once I got the panel where I wanted it.  You just HAVE to remove them after securing with screws or they will be epoxied in place.  It made the install a breeze once you know the panel is in the right place.

Hey Mike,

 

New Member...Was just admiring your photos.  Nice Job!

 

Wondering what your process is for scarfing sheets of plywood together?  I have seen several on youtube, but have never tried it myself.  From my perspective, more information is better than less.

 

Thanks!

 

Jim M

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Hi Jim,

 

I bought the kit from Graham so the panels were already scarfed.  Then it's just a matter of making sure you have the panels correctly placed (can be screwed up) and aligned.  I made a press of sorts to equalize the pressure on the joint while the epoxy dries.

 

Scarfing the plywood is not the only scarfing you'll need to do unless you can find and transport 20' pieces of wood for stringers and such.  I made a simple jig (below) that creates a 10:1 scarf on 3/4" lumber up to the max blade height of my table saw.

 

If you're not going to buy the kit, there are plenty of people on this forum who have more experience than me. 

 

Good luck!!

 

Mike

 

 

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Here's an update of what I got done over the past week:

 

Remaining side panel installed, bow and bottom profile formed (filled gaps where panels meet), fillet where bottom meets the chine, started fairing process.

 

I only found one area that really needs a lot of fairing (+ 1/8") near frame 2 on the starboard side.  I guess I shaved off a little too much from the stringers in that area to avoid having a gap between the chine and side that I had on the port side in that spot.  Anyway, it's got enough fairing compound on it now... it just needs to be finished.

 

I'm using West 410 fairing filler.  I hate that stuff.  It sags like crazy.  I try making it as thick as possible but it doesn't want to support its own weight.  Does anyone have any advice on use of fairing fillers?

 

Also, I'm getting ready to round over the side to chine joint and wonder if anyone has advice on how to get a consistent bead (?) down the side with the varying angles.  I have a laminate trimmer with an angle base attachment but maybe someone has a better idea.

 

Some pics:

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I'm using West 410 fairing filler.  I hate that stuff.  It sags like crazy.  I try making it as thick as possible but it doesn't want to support its own weight.  Does anyone have any advice on use of fairing fillers?

 

Try 407, I've had no sagging problems and it still sands well and is stronger than the 410.   Boat looks good.

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Latest update:  Initial fairing and sheathing is complete and final fairing started.  It was quite a challenge since I was working alone and wanted to get it done in one shot.  I used push pins to hold the glass in place until I reached the area with epoxy.  This worked out quite well.

 

Thanks to Miyot's advice, I started using 407 fairing filler which works much better that 410 on vertical surfaces.  I tried a 50/50 mix of 410 & 407 and it seems to work well and forms easily. 

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Dose anyone tried a tee top on a Marissa ??. These type of tents are not common in Malta, in fact I have never noticed a boat with it in my country .

 

 

I really like its style and I like the fact that there will be no obstructions on the deck .

 

What are the advantages and disadvantages  ?

Tee tops can be nice for providing a place to mount things overhead like electronics, VHF, rod holders etc.  and to provide a bit of shade.  Downside on a boat the size of Marissa is that they can make the back cast when fishing difficult.  Not a problem for trolling, drifting or bottom fishing.    I don't know how the additional wind drag of a t-top would effect performance etc.

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Nice boat Mike . The fairing looks fine . I'm in the process of flipping the boat and start the fairing. The last couple of weeks was working on a boat trailer for marissa.

 

Thanks 1blueheron for the info about the t-top. Please have a look to my tread named Marissa went to Europe.

 

Well done Mike and keep us informed with more photos!

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Latest update:  Nothing thrilling, just a LOT of sanding.  Final fairing is finally done.  Will put a coat of epoxy to seal the fairing compound next and then she'll be ready to flip. 

 

I have thought about priming prior to flipping and wondered if anyone had any thoughts on that.  I don't want to apply the topcoat until all the other work is done and I was wondering if there's some kind of time-critical component to the primer/topcoat application.  It might be 6 months between the two steps.  I know that in the car painting world, you generally want to prime (bare metal) and then paint prior to the primer curing. 

 

Also,  I bought two brass garboard drain plugs for the transom and wondered what people used to seal them in.  I plan on drilling slightly oversize holes and epoxying them but I'm wondering about how to seal the flange to the transom.  3M 5200 is the first thing that comes to mind but is there some other option that's better??

 

Thanks!!

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I totally finish and paint the hull before turning. Mask it well. When youbuild your deck and glass it over onto the hull, mask to where the rubrail will cover the bottom edge of the glass. Trim the glass along the masking tape while the resin is still "green".

 

You can buy a flaring tool to flare the cut end of the brass drain tube against the inside of the transom. 5200 would be ideal to seal it.

http://www.amazon.com/520290-1-Drain-Tube-Flaring-Tool/dp/B0082ANA0C

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Thanks Chick.  This is my first boat and I'm not sure if any damage will occur when flipping.  That's one of the reasons I'm hesitant to paint first.

 

I bought the threaded plug below so no need to expand. 

 

 

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I have thought about priming prior to flipping and wondered if anyone had any thoughts on that.  I don't want to apply the topcoat until all the other work is done and I was wondering if there's some kind of time-critical component to the primer/topcoat application.  It might be 6 months between the two steps.  I know that in the car painting world, you generally want to prime (bare metal) and then paint prior to the primer curing. 

 

Priming prior to flipping is pretty common, ultimately the answer is better suited to the paint manufacturer - their answer might be to scuff the primer when you are ready for top coat, or it may be to apply a fresh coat...

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