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CS17 mk3 hull #3 "Carlita"


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"Q" is flown from the port spreader haylard, and the country you are visiting's flag from the starboard.  I am sure that if you have the courtesy to fly both, they will excuse what ever adaptation you need to make.  In your case, Mexico's flag should stay up the whole time you are in their waters, with the US or US Marine Ensign should be flown from the stern or leach of the after most sail.  It is a nice combination of pride and respect.

 

I collect the flags I flew cruising.  Here are some:

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Oh, I know the etiquette, just wondering what adaptation, like the 2/3 leach deal for a triangular mainsail, do you make in displaying courtesy flags without spreaders?

Academic curiosity at this point, but the danger of a free month looms...

And I endeavor to always be polite to my hosts. Especially if they have nice surf and clear water to swim in! :)

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Back to the electrical questions - I hope you all don't mind.

 

I plan to use my CS15 for dinghy cruising, and I figure that sooner or later, I'm going to want to run a few things off of a 12 V battery, and I'd rather not have wires running through the cockpit.   So I ran a PVC pipe as a conduit from the forward bulkhead back into the stern locker and I threaded a length of 13 A extension cord through it.  

 

I was almost done congratulating myself on being forward-looking and inventive, when it dawned on me that there's probably a RIGHT way to do this that has been all figured out & tested.   What do I need to know and where can I find out about it?

 

Thanks, 

Bob

 

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Yeah, there is an approved (legal) way of doing this and using plumbing pipe isn't it. The first thing is making wire go around plumbing fitting 90's, which will just piss you off when you try. Second is access, in case you want to put something else in.

 

For example:

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using the appropriate exits and access fittings. Also if you stop buy the local big box store you'll see some pre-bent (PVC) pipe. Take note of the radius they use. Now you don't have to use pre-bent stuff, as a heat gun and wet rag will make any curves you want, but you'll get an idea of the radius that works, for the pipe diameter you're using.

 

Also, extension cord wire will work, but it's not "tinned" and not recommended in the marine environment. Technically, you don't need to use conduit, just stapling the wire in place will do. Of course, the conduit offers options when it comes to running more wires and making changes. Instead of running the extension cord, I'd simply install a heavy string, inside the pipe. This will be used as a "fish" line (or chase) to pull wire through the conduit, once you decide what you want and where it needs to be. You simply tape the string to the wire you intend to pull into the conduit, as well as a replacement fish line, so you always have it in there to  pull more or replace something.

 

For a small boat, I like to get the battery(s) in a better place than next to the trolling motor. This requires some bigass wire, run from the battery, aft to the powerhead on the motor. These wires can be simply stabled (clamped) to the seat top stringer or run in conduit. Additionally, you might want a power supply to charge up your cell phone, so a run of tinned 14/2 Duplex (16/2, 18/2, etc.), from the fuse (or breaker) panel to wherever you're going to put the cigarette lighter socket, so you can plug in the cell phone charger adaptor. Maybe some nav lights, fish finder, GPS plug, etc.

 

In a nutshell, you'll need to figure out what you want to do (count up the devices and watts), where these things might live, how much wire and it's appropriate size, etc., before you start running anything. On a small boat, this is simple, but it can get quite complex on larger craft.

 

Lastly, you're not going to sink, because you've used plumbing pipe and extension cord, though the extension cord wire will corrode pretty quickly in the marine environment. Buried under the seat tops, only you'll know about the wire pipe conduit. Given how simple your needs will be, you can just run several wires in the conduit (2 extension cords will offer 6 wires) and pair them up (+ & -) as you need them.

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  • 3 months later...

post-127-0-22640100-1473995705_thumb.jpgCarlita is finally getting tarted up. Having missed my trip west this summer I want to take her to the Mid Atlantic Small Craft Festival. She has been filled and sanded to Beth's satisfaction, I have permission to paint her. The picture shows her with a light coat of white AwlGrip white 545 primer. She had gray 545 primer but about 60% was sanded through.

 

The one advantage of being used for 6 months before final painting is that all of her coatings are as cured as they are going to be and print through should be minimal, not to mention a few fittings being re-positioned with the old holes filled and painted over. That is my story and I am sticking to it.

 

After a light sanding she will be top coated with AwlGrip polyurethane. 

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That is my story and I am sticking to it.

Ah, I see. No doubt the new B and B recommended method of completing the finishing touches and will be recommended for all in future plans :D

It's always good to see the silver lining.

Cheers

Peter HK

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Good to see the Master back to his own boat. Now to find the time to actually do some cruising! Heck, I know how it goes. Summer Breeze is STILL not totally finished, and she's not been in the water since our Appalachian Messabout. Soon hopefully. Anywat, we'll see y'all at the B&B messabout! ....finished-or-not!

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I'm taking it to the extreme. I'm going to let these panels "set" for a few more months before I start up again on old number 55. Make sure it's all cured really well.;)

Of course, anyone following my latest Kudzu build will know I can take a LOOOOONG time to build a boat. Or three. :)

Can't wait to see Carlita in her actual livery...

Peace,

Robert

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  • 2 weeks later...

Graham, are you still heading to St Michaels? I am taking my Sea Pearl down and will sail out to Wye Island Thursday and back Friday. I have been sporadically working on my CS20.3 but intend to crash it hard once the weather turns for a launch in the spring. I had a few misfortunes in the last year and a half that have slowed me down, but this is life. I hope to see you (Carla?) and Carlita there.

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Steve,

 

Yes we are heading for St. Michaels next weekend. Alan and Taylor are taking the expedition canoe and Beth and I are taking Carlita.

 

Due to the total lack of interest by the Navy in our stealth Carlita we have decided to give her some party clothes. Here she is getting her red skirt in our spray booth.

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Coolsville for sure! Love that high tech spry booth!!! Updraft, downdraft, side draft---it has it ALL.

 

I just showed the pictures to Summer Breeze. She LOVES the red. She and Carlita will look like a Christmas decoration together! Lookin' forward to seeing y'all in only THREE more weeks!!!

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Graham,

Annie and I will be there too. On Friday I will have put the last coats of paint on "Chessie's" bottom, waterline boot, and topsides. Time for a break and let the paint harden over the weekend. On Monday I'll install the half-ovals on the keel and the CB & Anderson Bailers. Roll her right-side-up on Tuesday.

Pete Mc

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Congratulations Graham, on winning First Prize at the MASCF with Carlita! I am totally jazzed by her - such a cool boat, and such an inspiration! ( congratulations to Alan for winning big as well!) So great to see B&B get well-deserved accolades.

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Thanks Fred,

 

We are back home after a great weekend. It was good to meet many old friends and make some new ones.

 

Here is a shot of the finished rig on the Chesapeake Bay Tunnel Bridge facing eastwards. The land in the background is Cape Henry, the southern cape guarding the entrance to Chesapeake Bay, to the left is nothing but ocean for a couple of thousand miles until you reach Spain.

 

With 430 miles to refill the tank, the car averaged 31 miles to the gallon.

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