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Rex Maddy

Curlew Build

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I just finished a Curlew Build.  It was a 2 year process with many interruptions but very enjoyable and memorable.  Right after taking the last pictures I tried it out and it tracks well, is maneageable in the wind and all I was hoping for it to be.  I also have a 17' cedar strip kayak that I made.  I like it too, but it is much heavier.  I will be taking to Curlew to Lake Monroe (Bloomiongton IN) to look for some new mushroom spots.  Thanks Jeff for all of the design work, advice, building directions and a quality job on cutting the frames.  Members of the forum were also invaluable for explanations when I was mired down with overthinking and stuck on perfection.  Next up will be a Long Shot, once I get my first mate used to thinking of kayak storage as kayak display and any other sales pitches I pick up from you guys.

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Thanks, my lighting and picture taking abilities were not so good.  It is finished with 'Corey's Goop'.  I found this online at the skin boat school in Washington state.

 

 

http://shop.skinboats.com/2-Part-Urethane-Coating-for-Kayak-Skin-goop1.htm%C2'> It is a 2 part urethane, odorless and, unlike urethane you buy at the hardware store, most of

 

it does not evaporate when it dries.  It is tough,  Other uses include sealing the surface of parking garages and making the heal of shoes.  There is a tutorial on how to apply it at the

 

skin boat school site.  I think you can add an orange tint if you like.  For me, I was going for a more naturall, buckskin, look that alowed the fuselage to be seen.

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I'm just about to start a curlew build and I'm glad to see your post.  Great job on the attention to detail.  I'm the same way and fear it will take me 2 years as well to finish mine.  The process is part of the fun as most of us would agree I think.  Anyway, I need to further look into this Corey's Goop stuff.  I was going to use Dura Tuff to give mine that natural look but maybe your approach is better.  Curious if you used the standard weight poly and if you had any application challeges. 

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Was that done with 1 order of Corey's Goop or did you have to order more than 1? My first boat will not be as long as the Curlew and I was curious about the coverage.

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I used the 12 oz per sq foot nylon that Jeff sells.  I know a lot of guys like the  dacron, and I may  use it some day, but I have wanted to use balistic nylon since back in the 90's when I first got interested in the thought of making a SOF after seeing some information about Bill Dyson's research.  I found that you can stretch it the best you can during the sewing process and it is still too loose.  If you wet it down, then it will dry and shrink.  In my research one guy mentiioned that you need to be careful because if you keep doing that it can shrink so much that it will break your chimes or  frames (especially the12 oz fabric).  Since getting it wet only once after being sealed I haven't noticed any more shrinking.

Corey wasn't familiar with the Kudzu boat - his boats have steamed, bent wood ribs - but he guessed I would need 1 1/2 orders at about $90.  I really used one.  He just didn't want me to run out during a coating.  It is useful stuff.  I put it on some wear spots on my bicycle seat and the tips of a greenland paddle I made.  Who knows where I will use the rest of it.  I have mixed as little as a 2 spoon ot 1 spoon mix and have good results, just mix it for 5 minutes to allow the CO2 bubbles to form and get out of the way, you don't want foaming.

 

I also found some useful advice for the lashing part at the end of the build.  There is a tutorial at the site below.  It involves making a 9/16 hole, too small for the bungee cord to go through (I used about 15 feet).  It works because you stretch the bungee, making it thinner, as you lace it through your holes.  I will lash a cedar strip kayak I made but never was satisfied with the  way they advised to attach the bungee lashing so I waited until I found a way to avoid screwing on brackets.  I don't like to use screws on these things if I can avoid it.  When he used bamboo chop sticks, or dowel rods to seal holes for the end loops I used 2 thicknesses of the bunge to squeeze in there to seal the braided strap I made for the ends.  It seems to be watertight so far. 

 

Enjoy the journey.  Jeff's passion has produced a lot of enjoyment for those of us who are restless, looking new challenges.  I have proven to myself that it can be done with limited ability and few tools.

 

 

http://www.skinboats.org/#!deck-lines/c1nw3

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Enjoy the journey.  Jeff's passion has produced a lot of enjoyment for those of us who are restless, looking new challenges.  I have proven to myself that it can be done with limited ability and few tools.

Thanks,

I agree. Jeff's videos are a big reason I started down this path. His explanations are very simple to understand and it made me think that even I could do it! ;) it's also a big reason I buy from his shop. He seams very passionate and sincere about what he does.

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Has anybody tried the Curlew in ocean and surf. I'm on the west coast and considering it for coastal day trip and some playing in waves. Any info would be great . Thanks

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I have been on the ocean around Vancouver and in some high waves on Lake Michigan.  I was in a plastic tandem or a 60 lb cedar strip kayak each place and I thought their heaviness was an advantage in rough water.

The Curlew is light bug responsive.  I don't know how that would all play out.

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Good job on the Curlew.  I never tire of answering the question of "did you build that" build yes...design, nope that honor goes to Jeff @ Kudzu Craft.  Oh, and I'll have to remember the "kayak display" line.  

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