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Core Sound 15 kit


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Graham, these videos are outstanding!  They go a long way to show me not only how to build the B and B family of boats, but they show off Alan's exquisite technique.  He is so neat and precise with his epoxy!  And I appreciate your "vetting" the videos before they are posted.  Thanks to both of you for all the work that this involves.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I got a little behind in video production but I'm back at it. Here is part 14.

 

 

Part 15 will be up tonight that gets us pretty much ready to paint the cockpit. 
 
As of today, the cockpit is painted and i have already flipped her and glassed the bottom. So expect some more videos soon. 
 
-Alan

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Having seen Alan work live and in person, when watching these videos it is a challenge to know when he is on fast forward or working real time. It seemed to me he was about that fast all the time. Humor aside, these videos are really helpful. One thing I have become a whole lot better at is to follow his example of cleaning up any extra epoxy in the form of drips, globs, squeeze out, etc. as I go. Much easier to clean it up before it hardens than after.

 

I have microwaved the A side of epoxy when it was cool and sluggish, in order to "liven" it up so it would soak in. But that was before adding the hardener. Not sure I would have the nerve to do that once it was mixed. There are times when I can barely get it out of the pot as it is.

 

When it was time for me to soak my rope, I poured the mixed epoxy over the rope that was coiled up in the bottom of the tub, then set the whole thing inside a one gallon metal can, put a lid on, then pulled a vacuum on it for nearly a minute. Sort of a poor man's resin infusion process. Seemed to work pretty well on a rope that was nearly 1/2" in diameter. The other thing that happened to me was once it was entirely soaked, it stretched. I probably gained 3 or 4 inches on a piece of rope that was maybe 5 feet long. Too much to fit the slot I had prepared for it. So I found a way to cut epoxy soaked line and moved on.

 

If there is another thing I've learned from these videos is when you encounter something unexpected, deal with it and move on. That and 100 ways to clamp pieces together while waiting for epoxy to kick  that I never knew existed.

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Hi all,

My 13 yr old son and I are awaiting the arrival of a cs17 kit and these videos have been invaluable in terms of envisioning the entire process, inspiring us to a bigger project than we might otherwise have taken on and helping us understanding what we're in for.   We will refer back to them many times, even though we're building the 17 instead of the 15. 

Is the boat in the video destined to be your own boat Alan, or is it sold already? 

-Matt and Tru. 

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Matt and Tru,

 

I'm so glad the videos have been helpful. I have had lots of positive feedback on them. This 15 is being commissioned by a new member to the B and B family who will take delivery of her at this year's B and B mess-about. 

 

My personal boat at the moment is my CS 17 'Southbound' http://www.sailnaway.blogspot.com/2012/09/southbound-completes-ncc-2012.html

 

She was given to me by my good friend Ken who is an active poster here who was the builder. I overhauled her 2 years ago this month and she has served me well. I'm starting to get the itch for a Mk3 though.  

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Alan, As time permits :-). With performance proven, do you think the CS15's bow area could be tricked a bit to accommodate a small pop-top cuddy & useable portapotti. tween the mast & CB, for these oldsters at least when anchored/beached without an adverse impact on structure :-)? Or maybe in the stern?  Trying to go to a smallest practical daysailer/explorer, as BH19 now at new home in Seattle. Thanks for the great videos.  Hope to see you all at Messabout. Best and prayers for Carla.  Rick Z

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Rick, 

 

For the 15, my suggestion would be a nice big dodger that snapped around the gunwale and across the foredeck with rotating bows that could be folded down onto the foredeck. A zipper door on the aft end and you would have a tent on the front half of the boat and if you converted the CB to a weighted style and added some seat top filler pieces you would have a nice seat top bunk for 2. A portapotti could be stored in a stern locker and used in the bow if need be. 

 

Here is a render of the tent bows. I didn't draw the actual fabric but you get the idea. 

stock_15_tent_bows.JPG

 

 
I was curious so I took Graham's MK3 idea and ran with it on the 15. Unfortunately the boat just isn't quite big enough to make the ergonomics work. Sitting headroom would only be possible if the cabin were made even taller than this and it's pretty chunky looking as it is. It could probably be massaged a bit to be made a little more pleasing to the eye. There isn't room for a bridge deck to sit on for rowing without losing minimum bunk length in the cabin. Also, the cabin isn't really big enough for 2 so it would be a solo cruiser. It would have water ballast, self draining cockpit. Could have a sliding hatch and a dodger or a trench. 

 

Here are some renders of the quickie 15-MK3 concept. Solo cruiser.

 

render1.JPG

 

render2.JPG

Could maybe build in a small galley to starboard behind the CB trunk. 

 

render3.JPG

Kinda chunky looking. 

 

render4.JPG

 

render5.JPG

 

Maybe if you were really short? Can't quite get sitting head room in the cabin. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hey Alan. Any more videos yet? We're ready for part 16.

 

Hey, I kinda like that little mini Mk-3. Sure beats the Peep Hen. West Wight Potter 15 is really popular. There are other 14s and 15s out there too. This would give them some competition. Some folks just like to "potter around" and speed isn't a concern. They want lower cost, ability to tow behind small car, and just like the idea of a minimal cruiser. Hey---how about an ocean crossing in it, like Tinkerbell or Yankee Girl? By-the-way, who is that ugly guy in your renderings?

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  • 5 weeks later...

Just an update on the 15. She is painted and almost ready for hardware. Since she will be going home with her new owner at the messabout she is being made ready with all of my available time and so the CS 15 video series is on hiatus until after the messabout BUT not to worry I am still taking lots of footage of the build and promise to finish the video series as soon as I have some free evenings!

 

-Alan

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Alan, I'm lookin' forward to seeing her at the mess-about, and the videos too.

 

By-the-way, Don "Thrillsbe" is really interested in sailing a CS-15 at the mess-about. Will this one or another one be available to try? He also would like an idea on cost of all materials, hardware, sails, etc. to build. I don't think he wants a kit, but would build from a plan. I'm pushing the kit Y'all have made me a believer! Maybe some input from you would help.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just uploaded Part 16 (Painting the Cockpit) and am working on the next segment which will cover glassing the bottom. 

 

 

I'm sure most have seen pictures of the new 15 from the messabout but here is one of my favorites. I will wrap up the video series as soon as possible. I had to sacrifice some video time in order to get the boat finished so I will try to fill in any holes. If anyone has questions please feel free to post in the youtube video comments and I will try and answer them or expand on any particular topics. 

 

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Part 17 and 18 are now uploaded. These 2 videos show how I rounded the chines in preparation for fiber glassing. 

 

 

I experimented with taping off the sheer line under the fiberglass. The idea being that it would keep any epoxy from dripping onto the side decks during the glassing and give a "cut line" for the glass similar to how surfboards are glassed. This turned out to be a lot of work for pretty much no gain. I wouldn't do it this way again. Next time I will just let the glass overhang the sheer and slice it off with razor after the epoxy has gelled enough that it doesn't stick to the blade. If possible, clean up any epoxy drips on the side decks after glassing, before it gels up. 

 

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I have also uploaded a short video on setting up your wood plane. Very Basic. You could pretty much build the entire boat up to this point without using or needing a wood plane except for maybe beveling the tops of the inwales but for rounding over the chines you pretty much have to have one. 

 

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Thanks again Allan for all your excellent videos.  I wish I would have known this information when I built 'Lively' back in '07.

 

I am curious why you like that photo the best.  When I see a boat healed that much, it looks like a keel boat.  I am under the impression that the CS sails better and faster with much less heeling.  My favorite photos are CS's sailing relatively flat and fast.

 

My 2 cents worth.

dale

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