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CS17 #370 Peggy-O


LennieG
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I am thinking I will store my future oars under the side decks as you mentioned but I figure they won't tuck neatly under there without some curvature built in. I also wonder if the curvature could be used when rowing to wrap around the high decks and maybe require less length than straight oars.

If by this you mean build in a bend down when the oars are in place rowing and the blades are perpendicular to the water I think you will find they twist in your hands as you try to make a stroke.

Unless...the handle kinks at the loom so that its axis still intersects the center of the blade. Of course the balance may be weird. Far Fetched, I know, which by the way is not a bad boat name.

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I'm mainly concerned about the hardness and  "slipperyness" of the plastic. How about cutting another piece to attach where the clamp screws tighten down with holes hole-sawed into them that the screw pads recess into? Then even if the clamps slip a bit, they can't go anywhere. I had a motor come off once---not a fun experience. The only thing that saved me was the fuel hose!

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Maybe I will rethink the plastic. I am not married to it....just trying make it a low profile minimalist look, and added the wood to add some interest and match the rub rail and coaming. I have some 1" mahogany left over from inside reinforcement which I could use and paint it white, or varnish. I thought a painted or varnished surface would be more slippery than cutting board material....never noticed cutting boards being slippery after washing at home. But, I trust and defer to you guys on this.....Thanks

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Those look like cutting boards, so they'd be HDPE and it's "self lubricating" which is a fancy way of saying slippery. It works well in compression, which is what it's doing under the clamp, it's also inert, so it can't rot, though it can trap moisture under ti against the wood. A few small dents with a forstner bit or flat bottom router, plunged down say 3/16" will keep the clamps located.

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Lennie,

 

What Dave suggested is exactly what I did when I build 'Lively'.  I used the cutting board my wife had in the kitchen.  Then I drilled an indent slightly larger than the clamp about a 3/16 deep on the inside side of the transom. I have been using this solution with no problems.  However, just for my peace of mind and a small security factor, I also chain the motor to the boat.

 

I cannot not tell for sure from your photo but it looks like your board it sticking up a couple of inches above the transom.  This puzzles me because I am using a 20 inch shaft 2HP Honda and mine is up about 1/2 inch on the center side and maybe 1 inch at most on the outside.  Also, it appears that yours is mounted much closer to the center than mine.  I have had no problems.  So be careful to be sure you have adequate room to clear the rudder full over and clearance at the bottom to 360 degree the motor.

 

Also, one thing I might change if it did it over is to maybe mount it about 1/2 inch lower. But again, I have not had any problems.

dale

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Thanks All

 I will look at it all again on my return with fresh eyes. As far as the height, on top it should just clear the 1/4 " deck that I will be adding.....don't forget this is the aft deck model. At the bottom of the motor the cavitation plate is an inch below the transom, per spec I believe.

Laterally the motor just clears the rudder in their most extreme positions so I think I am good there. Worry a bit about the mizzen sheet getting fouled on the motor but it seems to rise off the deck at steep angle. If I stay with the plastic I will absolutely take your suggestions on the indentation.

enjoying Budapest Hungary. This poor country has been getting their butt kicked forever. I already knew I am a lucky man but let me repeat: we Americans are lucky summabiches.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I would appreciate some clarity on the following. Perhaps this is one of those things that becomes abundantly clear after this step is finished but is very murky to me currently. (Reminds me of the seat hatches or CB trunk....second boat will be quick :))

i am at stage of adding supports for deck, and coaming.

In my kit I have 4 parts named( 2)Foredeck aft deck beam knees and

(2)side deck knees, per kit parts diagram attached. My question: where do they get placed? I cannot find it on plans, unless they are interchangeable with "gussets" for coaming. I would not think that is the case as there would be no need to add one beside the deck beam attached to the forward bulkhead.

 

next, the pieces that support the coaming, or Gussets. The aft deck plan page attached shows the placement; it is not a kit part so I assume I will cut those out of plywood unless the knees above serve dual purpose? Assuming I need to cut them, a couple questions: 

i assume I make a template using junk ply and trial and error, bevel gauges etc. On a prior post there was a discussion about the angle for the coaming, which I assume is really a angle for the carlin which the coaming gets attached to......there was mention of a 7 degree and a 12 degree angle, forward and aft. I can't figure out that angle as it would seem to be a near 90 degree angle coming off the plane that the deck rests on......can anyone simplify this for me?

hoping to not wait until the mess-about on this piece.

thanks!!!!

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Yes, they are the same as the gussets.  The two detail views show how they are situated.  The large one attaches forward of the deck beam (aft of the bulkhead).

 

If you have these gusset/knees from the kit, that is good because they will define the angle of the coaming which is a detail that I wrestled with for some time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So enjoyable to spend a couple days cutting wood, shaping it and fitting it into what will become a unique boat. Have enjoyed the process of customizing the carlin placement, sitting in the boat and testing angles ( was it Scott's post that referred to a beer test?) , not that I don't love epoxy and marine paint :)

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