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Mess about stern assembly


garrett6575
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On the stern assembly are all 3 pieces supposed to be square? In my picture, A is square to B and A is square to C; however, the angle between B and C is less than 90 degrees.  Is this supposed to slope down or did I screw up my cut.  I assume the key is that the stern is square to the frame so the boat tracks straight, but I am curious if I should adjust this or not.

post-3253-0-48894700-1373511812_thumb.jpg

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If you cut accurately, and joined square, then you did it right. The angle between B and C is determined by the shape of A.   Keep in mind that the boat has a little rocker in it and that the stern and bow should accept the curve ot the stringers as they meet them. 

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Switching to the other end of the boat, I have questions on the bow.   First, should there be a cutout for the deck beam or does it end flush with the frame?  There wasn't a cutout on the plan.  Actually, I am not sure there was a cutout for the keel ether, but I added one.

 

Second question, should the bottom stringers lash to the bow and if so where?  It looks like they would end in the cutout.  As you can see in the picture, mine are short if this is needed, so if they need to lash to it, I need to fix that.  I assumed the ended at the frame.

 

Do you have a picture of a mess about frame for comparison?

 

 

post-3253-0-46279600-1374079176_thumb.jpg

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  • 1 year later...

Question on the stern assembly of the Castaway.  The plans labeled stern top have a 1/2" x 4.5" cut out for mating with the stern.  However, the tab on the top of the stern is marked to be cut with a 5" tab.  Any others run into this discrepancy?

 

I think I would prefer to cut the stern 5" tab down to 4.5" and have it mate with stern top.  Any reason why enlarging the stern top female slot to 5" would be a better option?

 

 

castway stern top.pdf

castaway stern assembly2.pdf

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Thanks Jeff.  One less question you may have to address in the future.  I shortened the tab and filled with epoxy, cellulite mix to take care of any voids.

 

Frames and bow and stern assemblies are cut, sanded, rounded over, and have 3 coats of boiled linseed oil and varnish and mineral sprits mix.  I even rough spaced frames on strong back.  Tested a keel strip and am getting a real sense of how the framing will come along.  One thing that surprised me was the 0,0 point was the stern.  I figured it to be the bow.  Checked manual and yes, stern is 0,0.  Are all designs laid out stern to stem?

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The short answer is, no.

All boats are not designed, drawn, or laid out the same way. There are as many ways to design and draw boats as there are to build them, at least.

I found the coordinate system Jeff uses to be unusual, but I learned to loft (laying down and taking off) the old fashioned way, and always in feet, inches, eights. I have lofted a few boats full size in metric units, however, and they are pretty slick.

The x,y,z thing is pretty cool, though...

Whether to start at the stem or the stern is analogous to whether a boat should face left or right in a profile drawing. Coke or Pepsi?

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One thing that surprised me was the 0,0 point was the stern.  I figured it to be the bow.  Checked manual and yes, stern is 0,0.  Are all designs laid out stern to stem?

 

From what I have seen it is normal for ships, as in really large ships. But no, not all boats. The software I looked at assumed 0 as the stern, but if you look at some of the old masters plans you will see different methods uses.

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