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Andy2755

Spindrift 12SN

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I havent been able to find any photos of the 12S on the net so am not sure what the hull & rigging looks like, but I am leaning towards the 12S as a 1st build before hopefully moving on to something bigger. The Spindrifts simplicity and good looks really appeal to the engineer in me.

 

My reasoning is as follows:

  • [*]After many years, I would like to get back into sailing, possibly with my kids [*]A relatively simple 1st build would be the way to go [*]The boat should accommodate me (87kg) and my son (built like an ox - about 100kg) [*]I raced a lot in my youth (dont ask how many years ago :) ), so would like a boat with decent performance [*]Once I get confident enough, I would like to sail it out in the bay. I'm assuming the 12 is the most seaworthy of the Spindrifts

My (maybe crazy) question is, is it feasible to build a nesting version of the 12S ie a 12SN?

 

I could probably transport it nested on top of my 6' box trailer and would have to store it inside (no garage)

 

If the 12SN isnt doableI would then have to make the choice between the 12S and the 11N......... :unsure:
 
Any comment or advice would be appreciated!

 

 

 

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If the main purpose of the boat is a daysailer I recommend you do not build the nesting version regardless of length.  To do so you have to give up the side seats/flotation which are by far the most comfortable and performance oriented places to sit while sailing.  Is a nesting version really all that important?  Is a small boat trailer and a cover for storage an option?  Only you can answer these.  I own nesting 9, and it is a clever design feature. But I often regret what I give up in layout.  Its all about compromises no matter what you choose.

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My first build was a CS17. If you have the space you should consider the CS15 or CS17. Two full-sized people can fill up a 12 foot boat pretty quickly. I don't think any greater skill is required for the CS. Ya get a big pile of wood and a set of plans and start on page one. When you get to the end of the plans the pile of wood is gone and there's a boat!

A kit makes it even easier.

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Thanks guys for the responses!

 

My theory at this stage is to "dip my toe in the water" so to speak - if the rest of the family takes to daysailing I would definitely move up to something larger like the CS17-what a fantastic looking boat! If it ends up being me on my lonesome  :( then something smaller and more manageable like the Spindrift may still fit the bill. I guess also the Spindrift is also quicker/cheaper to build so thats why Ive kind of decided it would be the best bet as a 1st boat to cut my teeth on.

 

The main reason for wanting the nesting version is that it would live at my holiday house up the west coast of RSA, which has no fence or garage so if its non-nesting it would have to stand outside. The nesting version could easily live indoors while we are not there, and I could manhandle the two halves down to the water for a sail on my own if need be.

 

Hirilonde, your points regarding the "downside" of the nesting option are appreciated. I reckon if I can sort out the storage security issue, then I will definitely go for the un-nested version which by the sound of it will be a better sailer. Then I would have to get a cover and a small trailer which is no big deal, or make-up the clever system which Ive seen on this site for single-handedly getting the boat up on car roofracks.

 

Either way, Im dead keen on the S12. Im sure when I study the plans, I can figure out the feasibility (or not) of making the nesting version.

 

The kids have already been strong-armed into saying they will "help" with the build, so thats a good start. Just need to convince the wife that I must commandeer part of the lounge for a couple of months for the build....shouldnt be too hard  :)

 

One strategy (which I will try and follow) seems to be to manufacture all the "bits" first and go 3D as late as possible. If I do it that way, and really put in some effort once the boat is 3D, I should be able to minimise the lounge disruption factor, which will be good for all concerned.

 

The time for procrastination will have to come to an end shortly and I will have to take the plunge!

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I'm sure the 12S will make a great little sailboat for you and one other or two smaller ones. I've thought of building one myself. I enjoyed sailing with my wife in the 11N I built. If you really must store it inside, the nesting version will sail just as well as the 12. I'm guessing Graham simply hasn't had much interest in a large nesting version since they are mostly used as tenders and the 10 and 11 are plenty for on-deck storage.

 

It would be easier for people to maneuver around when tacking in the 12S. Are you sure that you can't come up with a small shed or something for storage? Maybe there's a rental storage space nearby for off-season. Or maybe you could build a cart to hold it on it's side and roll it in the house when you're away.

 

A set of strap-on wheels like I built http://www.pbase.com/onceagain/dolly would make it easy enough to cart down to the beach. Manhandling the sections of a nesting version is not as easy as you might think. I found it easier to maneuver the 11N using the rollers when it was connected than handling the two sections separately.

 

You're on the right track. Either way will give you good sailing.

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 Im sure when I study the plans, I can figure out the feasibility (or not) of making the nesting version.

 The nesting and conventional plans are seperate items.  You would have to buy both plans to compare them in detail.  The hull, rig, daggerboard and trunk, rudder  are the same either way, but the whole bulkhead, flotation and seating is completely different.  The layout of the nesting version has to leave the aft section very open to allow the fore section to nest inside it.

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Here's a thought. You primarily want a boat that can be stored inside in two sections - it doesn't have to be nesting! One big drawback to a nesting design is that the stern section must be almost empty to be able to hold the bow section. If they don't have to nest, then you can build the seats in the stern section normally. 

 

After the hull is complete (before the seats are in), you could simply add a double center bulkhead where the boat would be separated.  The location of the center bulkhead should be situated to work with the daggerboard box (is the S12 a centerboard design?) similar to the nesting version but the seating could be similar to the regular design.

 

The center bulkheads could be trimmed down to just above the loaded waterline so the wouldn't be too obtrusive. Then build in the seats. 

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Garry,

 

I think you have found the answer :D

 

Thats whats so amazing about this website - Post a question, go off to sleep and when you wake up the next morning, great minds have been at work and theres your answer  :rolleyes:

 

Youre quite right, the two halves dont have to nest inside each other, its only for storage, and possibly also to be able to handle the boat by myself .

 

Its sounding to me like I should take the plunge and build the 12S, and use it for a while before deciding if I really really need it to be in two pieces. I guess it could be cut in half later and the two centre bulkheads added? Scary but possible? Maybe it wont even be necessary if I can figure the storage aspect out.

 

For interest, here's my little "home away from home", 32°19'5.02"S 18°19'49.21"E . You can probably see from streetview, why the dinghy needs to be easily carried - have to get it up those stairs - at least until I close in the downstairs . The bay to the north is perfect for sailing when the sea is flat, and theres a long estuary to the east - about 12km (8miles long). Very little sailing happens here, so I would have it all to myself! Once I get braver, some coastal trips should be possible too.

 

 

Thanks to all guys for your input, really appreciated.

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 I guess it could be cut in half later and the two centre bulkheads added? Scary but possible?

 

Scary is the right word.  The nesting boats have the center bulkheads installed before cutting in half.  Otherwise the 2 hulls distort during/after cutting and may never line up again.  I would think the way to go would be to build a nesting Spindrift, then add the conventional seating/flotation, then cut it in half.  Also consider that you will not have a conventional Spindrift that comes apart as you will also have the nesting bulkheads.  I am not saying this is a bad idea, but I think you have to build it nesting from the start and keep in mind that even though you will have the side seating of the conventional boat, but also the nesting bulkheads, which are sort of in the way while sailing.  This may very well be the boat you are looking for, or at least the best compromise for your needs.   I think it is time to talk to Graham.

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Hi Hirilonde,

 

I agree - time to discuss with Graham, but I think your suggestion is the answer ie build a boat with the side seats/buoyancy tanks which also has the 2 central bulkheads and can be dissected later if needs be.

 

Ive got a birthday coming up soon, so the plans could be the perfect gift to myself - I deserve it!  :)

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........................... build a boat with the side seats/buoyancy tanks which also has the 2 central bulkheads and can be dissected later if needs be.

 

Ive got a birthday coming up soon, so the plans could be the perfect gift to myself - I deserve it!  :)

 

I think you have to commit to nesting from the start.  When you install the nesting bulkheads they are separated by cardboard spacers, they are unfinished on the sides facing each other and they are not yet taped to the hull on these adjoining sides.  Leaving them this way to get wet is not a good idea and there is no way to finish them until the boat is cut apart.

 

Consider what ever excuse you like, everyone deserves the plans to build a boat.  :P

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Someone on this forum built and finished an S11N without making the CUT, sorry I don't remember who. I don't know if he ever did cut it. but you can if you want to I think. just epoxy coat the mating sides of the bulkheads before you put the cardboard spacers. though I can see there might be other issues, but it mostly involves having to do more work.  :wacko:

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....................... though I can see there might be other issues...............

 

This is what I would be afraid of.  I can think of several possible issues, and every plan I think of to eleviate them makes the process even more tedious with still no guarantee of success.

 

I suppose you could caulk the gap betweent the bulkheads with something that could be cut easily afterwards. But I would still worry that it would leak into the space.  Factor in that the bulkheads are no less in the way whether you cut the boat or not.  So if you are building the nesting version I see no reason not to cut it.  I rarely take mine apart and it works just fine not taking it apart.  No worse than not cutting it at all.  The down side to the nesting version is the bulkheads themselves now that Garry has resolved the seating arraingment.

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