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Core Sound 17 hull #357


Dnjost
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I glassed the outside of the hull with 6 oz. cloth, (taped chines per plans).  I am a really bad sailor, and I'm very grateful for the abrasion resistance on New England's unforgiving "beaches".  To Dale's point, it probably could get away without the cloth if I was a bit fastidious about jumping on scratches before water got between the layers.  But I ain't because the hull's way down there and I'm way up here, y'know?

 

The interior and deck I just coated with epoxy and then painted.  It's held up far better than I expected, and since I can see any damage when it happens, I patch and fill any gouges or stuff pretty quickly.  'Cause it's up here and so am I, y'know?

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That is the direction I am going Scott,  no glass on the inside.  I will put down a layer of thinned epoxy to seal the plywood and then use primer, and two coats of top coat.  the only boat I glassed the interior of is the fishing skiff pictured on my avatar.  It has held up miraculously well for five years painted with primer over epoxy and two layers of Kirby's semi gloss oil paint.  Kirby's always looks great, but has also gotten very expensive.  I may try the System three waterbase paints.  I did skip the tape on the chines on the fishing skiff, and had to redo after it banged around against docks, the trailer, beaches, etc.  Will tape the chines with the 45 degree 6 oz as described by Phil G.  I now understand the purpose of the plastic after trying a few strips without the plastic.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

The boat has faired seams, and I plan to glass them with 6 oz glass laid on the bias next weekend.  However, the last 3 feet of hull are showing a 1/2 dip after getting a real good look at this area and checking with a straight batten.  Question for the group should I:

  1. ignore it and just live with it.  Nothing a little filler under the keel won't hide.  A little compound to blend it in and no one will know.
  2. apply 10 oz glass in successive layers each smaller than the previous.  Then fair with compound.  
  3. get some foam, shape it and glass it to fill the void.  tempting.  

As this really is the aft planing surface, it bothers me knowing that this is here.  Wish I had caught it previously.  

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  • 3 months later...

Some install a gasket to help with water boiling up, into the slot and to keep out rocks and debris. This can be as simple as some sail cloth material stapled to the bottom of the boat, in two strips, slightly overlapping so they close when the board is fully retracted. The offset board location mitigates these issues to a great degree, so I think it's unnecessary, but . . .

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The gasket is not on the plans, but it is easy to put it on at this stage of the game.  The gasket helps minimize turbulence around the centerboard slot, which can shoot up into the case and rob a little speed.  I have always had one on my cb boats, so am used to the idea.  When and if it wears out, I may or may not replace it.  I am using 2" mylar set on a dacron fabric which is then glued to the hull with polyurethane sealant (Sikaflex in this case).  The strips will overlap each other by about 3mm (in theory, we will see how good my building skills are here).  If it is a pain, then will forget it.  

 

Prior to shaping the keel, I had considered leaving the 2" stern end full size and using the gasket material to close the space between the rudder and the keel.  Then put the OCD side of me to bed for the day.  This is a daysailer not an Olympic class.  That .0001 knot increase in speed will need to be found elsewhere.  Skipper diet? 

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We added the slot strip material for three reasons; speed, quiet and dryness.  The difference in speed is small but the other two effects are a huge improvement.  The speed difference is real though, the faster you go the more it helps.  Took about 3 hr total to glue on then fiberglass over the front edge.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

I agree with PAR.  I believe the slot does not need to be covered.  I did not on 'Lively' and have not had any problems with rocks or sand making it stick.  On the CS series with the offset slot and the one inch keel rocks and sand do not seem to be a problem.  I speak from having an O'Day Daysailor with a centerboard slot in the center of the boat with no keel.  It had a sort of slotted plastic cover.  The primary reason I sold it was because of all the times I had problems with the board getting stuck in the up position whenever I beached it.  Many times I had to go underwater with a special tool I made to stick up in the board slot in order to pull it down.  In my mind the slot cover helped capture sand which made it more likely to stick.

 

I guess if you want to go really really fast and you sail in deep water and do not beach the boat, you might want a slot cover.

 

My 2 cents worth.

dale

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  • 3 weeks later...

Finally got to the painting stage.  Due to the close quarters and lack of spray equipment I have gone with the System 3 Waterbased LPU.  The primer went on great, and sands readily to make an excellent base for the top coat.  The first layer of top coat not so well.  It was a very dry day and the paint sets up incredibly fast.  Will sand smooth tomorrow and then thin the next two coats to roll and tip.  Might invest in a spray paint system as it is kind of a shame to not get a better paint job at the final stage.  Looks great from 5' feet away.  

 

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I gave up on the System Three WR-LPU as being imposable to spray. One thing I did note is, unlike other paints, this stuff needs and likes high humidity. I ran a humidifier when using this stuff, which helped tremendously. Yeah, I can see your "lap marks" because the stuff was drying too quick. Humidity will help a lot. This is the only product I know, where painting in the rain with the garage door wide open, is actually a good idea. It'll maintain a "wet edge" longer.

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Update.  today, I applied the second and third coats with the garage door open, in the rain.  I also thinned the paint 10% with water (small instructions on the side of the can suggest this for roller/brush), resulting in much better results.  A foam brush rather than the polyester one helped lay down a flatter coat.  It took 1.5 hours per coat.  The water cleanup for this is remarkably good.  

 

Later on a buddy of mine promised to send me his professional auto polisher along with the grit(s) for a wet sand/buffed finish.  Pretty sure this is going to work, but need to apply at least one more coat of paint.  

 

 

 

 

20141007_112919.jpg

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