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Core Sound 17 hull #357


Dnjost
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How many people have fiberglassed at least the outside of their CS 17/20?  While it is several weeks off, I am debating whether or not to glass the outside of the hull to cut down on some maintentance, and reinforce the hull.  I did use the BS1088 Okoume so, question if I am just wasting time and money here.  all panels should be cut and shaped by the end of the weekend and look forward to the folding!  

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Well, epoxy alone is quite hard. All my outboard race boats were WEST resin coated, 2 coats, maybe 3 if aforementioned boat didn't have to race for a week or so. Only fiberglass was one layer of 6 oz on the INSIDE of the bottom for the last few feet, and that was because I was using 4mm on the bottom of a boat which ran in the high 60 mph speed range.

Of course a wrap of glass cloth leaves you with a smoother base than wood with glass tape on the seams.

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I'm planning to glass the hull--at least up to the chine--perhaps the side panels as well. One other builder I spoke w/ strongly recommended it, but I've seen folks both in favor and not here on the forum. I don't expect to get to that decision point until I get the interior finished and I do the first hull flip.

 

Good luck w/ the unfolding --- an extra set of hands will help as those long panels get pretty floppy (though still possible to do alone). Also, try to keep the side panel 'wings' from getting too far out to the side as you settle the bottom panels into position.

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My garage is about the same size as yours!  I will head your advice on not letting the side panels get out too far as I can see that these could become sizeable fulcrums pulling in the wrong direction.  Will be impossible in the narrow building space!  

 

Doing up an order for Mertons as I need more epoxy and glass tape, and was debating ordering the glass for the hull, but will wait until I need to make the decision.  I have had good luck with glassing hulls as opposed to leaving them unglassed.  this actually saved my neck one day as the only thing between me and the deep blue sea turned out to be a layer of 6 oz glass covering a very delaminated hull.  

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David,

I am one of those folks that did not glass the outside or inside of 'Lively'.  She was launched May '07 and I have had no problems with her at all.  I have already stated in more detail on this forum. What I did do is cover the keel and 4 inches on either side with Polester fiber for better abrasion.  I also put a 6" wide and about 4 feet long piece on each side of the bottom where the chine is.  This protects her as she leans over on the beach.  I have beached her many times and am happy with this arrangement.  By not glassing you save weight and epoxy.  I did use three coats of epoxy everywhere.  I guess I should add, I did glass all seams per the plans.

Dale

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I always glass the hull for the extra "ding" resistance and scuff resistance. I like the extra security of the glass. To me it's well worth the extra cost and time. I use 6 oz. on the sides, and 10 oz. on the bottom with the overlap on the chines, transom corner, and center on the hull. Graham recommends glassing the hull first and then adding the keel. Also lap the glass over into the centerboard trunk.

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update - 

All four panels are cut out, marked, and the stringers have been scarfed and assembled for installation.  Looks like an error crept in and got compounded in one of the bottom panels on the upper edge.  Either the starboard one is 3/8 too short, or the port 3/8 too wide.  I think I will proceed and start to go 3D with the build and correct to a fair line port and starboard either by trimming/shaping, or filling/shaping as necessary.  Very hot, steamy, rainy weather is slowing things down and adding to the little mistakes here and there.  Side panels are a very nice mirror image of one another.  I left the stem a little long for shaping as well.  Photos when it gets cooler.  

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I did stack and cut for the sides.  The bottom panels are quite off at the center temporary frame mark, did match all except one section as it looked to be quite off.  I will take the lines off the plans for the center frame and then adjust and plane both sides to that line as you describe.  Don't think it is a big deal as long as it's symmetrical and matches the center frame.  I may need to splice in a small section of plywood to bring the panel to shape.   Then again, I could always change that frame slightly to fix the problem as long as it doesn't compound further down the line.  I also shortchanged the seat stringers by 1.25 inches at the bow, as I cut them to 14'10" then trimmed the aft section to accommodate the transom and support,  doh!  Once again, I don't think it really will impact anything in the long run.  Should have just moved the whole thing forward and inch.  Oh well.  

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Upper edge of port bottom panel is 1/2" short at station 5. Tempted to just make a note and fill and fair while building. A coat or two of paint and no one knows. Other option is a plywood spile onto the edge with the scrap from the original cut. It would still be under the epoxy grout and tape, so would be well hidden by several coats of paint and glass. I obviously read a number wrong several times as i measured many times. At least it doesn't look to be terminal.

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I really wish I had known about graham's advice and glassed bottom first before installing keel.. The front half of my keel has been one of my most problematic areas, even with epoxy strips, and later kevlar strips glassed in. In the future I will take the advice given and put a plastic strip or SS on the bottom keel.

 

I don't regret 10 ounce cloth on bottom for all the rocky beaches I've been on, and watching my boat as the tide went around get bounced with wave action on a rocky lagoon bottom by Hope Island near Shelton WA.

 

Glassing the sides was the best thing I ever did. It has not only saved my boat when coming in on a badly designed boat ramp and being windward with massive waves beating me against the dock (last December in Machester, WA), but saved the hull when it flew/tumbled off my trailer in the car accident (t-boned). The boat was the only thing that didn't get totalled.

 

That being said glass has probably added weight, but if you are going to use your boat at a lot of docks, or in rough areas it's probably worth it. I noticed the shells on a piling at low tide barely bothered it.

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New photo of progress.  In the steam heat of New England, progress has been slow, but steady.  I was able to get the bottom panel that was too short fixed by adding a sliver of 3/8 to the bottom edge.  Then, taped the sides to the bottoms as described.  Then, with a thunder storm approaching, slid the whole flat assembly back into the garage.  Wish I had a picture of this, as it looked ridiculous, but time was of the essence.  Then, I stood the whole thing on edge and used the wall as the support for one side while unfolding.  The boat instantly becomes a boatish looking thing.  However, the forward edge of the bottom panel did crack in one spot and will need repair (today's project).  Nothing terminal.  things will get easier when the center temporary frame is installed.  Glassing the hull will definitely be done for further reinforcement of the thin panels, as well as protection for rocks, piers, and docks. .  

 

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ok builders. One question. On the plans, it appears as if the forward bulkhead is set forward of the mark; and the aft bulkhead and temporary center frames placed aft of the marks.

this is contrary to other boats I have built where any frame forward of the center of the hull is aft of the line, and the aft frames placed forward of the mark. Am I missing something? Things are slowly starting to line up.

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my forward bulkhead was roughly centered at the top rail... at the bottom it was aft of the mark when I wired it up. The bulkhead is thin enough that I would be surprised if +/- the thickness made a big difference.  Is the second picture a template or the actual bulkhead?

 

chris

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