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Fishman38

fishman38 OK20

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It's probably there but I haven't seen this topic discussed in the threads I follow. In the interest of minimizing waste (again) I cannot come up with what seems to be a valid reason to avoid using pieces of ply as illustrated in the above picture, at least on the inside layer, so long as the horizontal butt joint is on the middle stringer as shown.  I have some concern about the effect on the contour but it seems to me that would not be a problem as long as its clamped tightly at each end.  But then there is the issue of making it too tight and squeezing out all the glue.  So I add more thickener and maybe use a little coarser grid sandpaper to roughen each surface, and try to be gentle.  Using this method would probably save at least one sheet of 4mm ply, maybe more.  (BTW, for all I know this may be a common practice?  I'm pretty sure they had to do something like this in building the Spruce Goose!)

 

This would not be that big an issue were it not for the fact that getting an additional sheet of 4mm is non-trivial since it has to be shipped cross country.

 

Note:  Please see the next post.  This is apparently a very bad idea.  For that matter just asking the question wasn't a particularly good idea either! :)

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 I hope this is not an  early April fools joke and if it is I am sorry for being so  tough on you.  Go ahead and cheap out on one whole sheet of plywood. Really? One sheet?  You will pay  10  times that trying to fair the hull with the mess this will create.  A hull  that has curves needs to be fair, not  a bunch of facets. This idea is not brilliant or smart. It is just plain dumb. Show me how this could possibly be a fair curve.  Don't overthink this process. Do it the way  that all the smart guys that have  gone down this road before have taught us.  Not trying to be too harsh but this is just a bad idea.  Please remove that picture so that someone else won't ever try this.  

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Whew, Tarbaby, excuse me!  Based on comments I've seen on this forum before I was under the impression that the only dumb questions were those that were not asked.  I guess I proved that myth just that, a myth huh :)  Seriously, thanks for leaving no ambiguity.  I will order a single sheet from Spain where they're made if necessary!............

 

I do believe I'll leave the picture up however.  No one who sees it and reads your comments would dare make that mistake!

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Fish-

If I am not mistaken your photos are upside down. I had the same issue and learned that when using my IPad or iPhone as camera the home button has to be on the right side, then the internet gods don't flip your photos when attaching.

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I think the only one that is upside down is the first one posted on Dec 28.  I just inverted the camera for that one as Miyot had done on some of his just to show what the profile will look like when finished.

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Yes, and I like them that way.  At least you can get a look before turnover.  Good to see you are still working on the boat Fishman.  I am making progress as well, but I'm not putting in the hrs I did in the beginning.  My motor has arrived but I won't be ready for it until the weather breaks.  I hope sometime in Feb.  Keep the updates coming.  I'll post some when some more progress has been made.

 

I think the only one that is upside down is the first one posted on Dec 28.  I just inverted the camera for that one as Miyot had done on some of his just to show what the profile will look like when finished.

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The last couple of months with holidays and related travel and a couple of weeks of single digit highs and sub-zero lows certainly cut into my boat building time but I managed to get a little work done now and then.  Should be fairly clear sailing now til late spring and hope to finish the planking in a couple of weeks.  Good to hear from you Miyot!

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looking good fishman! I slowed down around the holidays, then is was the end of our deer season, 1 more weekend of duck season and I will be back on. 

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The closer I get to flipping this boat the more I think about finishing the interior.  It's my understanding that every square inch of the interior wood should be glassed, then two or three coats of unthickened epoxy to fill the weave, then primer then paint.  This includes the underside of the deck right?  And the underside of the sole?  Which means one must fit, then glass, the underside of the sole before installing...?  .........................just sort of thinking out loud here (in print that is) but any comments are welcome!.............even sarcastic ones :D

 

A question that comes to mind: I assume that the common practice is to fasten the sole down with (marine grade SST,bronze, silica bronze, etc ?), that is any boat that has a sole, to allow access below "decks" i.e. fuel tank, fuel lines, wiring, etc.  Am I wrong?

 

And another one:  It seems that anti-fouling paint is generally recommended for below the waterline, exterior finish.  Why would that be on a boat that normally sits on a trailer, and rarely if ever is left on the water overnight?  Am I reading the wrong material?

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I am not glassing the underside of my decks.  Just applying two coats of epoxy resin, making sure the second coat is still tacky while fastening it down.  I think the deck should be epoxied down as well as screwed.  You could make the fuel tank areas accessible by not epoxying these areas and just screwing down the deck in the fuel tank spots.  This is extra work, cutting out the deck over the tanks, measuring and fitting and then use a sealer of your choice and screwing them down.  Many recommend this as access is invaluable if you have fuel problems down the road.  

 

I put a round deck hatch over all hose connections to the tanks so connections can be checked and maintained as well as the tank data stamped on the tank can be viewed.  I think this is  required by law.  Replacing a hose would be difficult but not impossible through these hatches.  I did not make deck cut outs for the entire tank.  Perhaps I may regret this some day.  However the dimensions of the fuel tank space can me measured for through the round deck hatches and the deck cut out to access the tanks in the future should a tank develop a leak.  This would have to be done carefully and a power saw could not be used for fear of an explosion. 

 

I used anti fouling paint on my bottom even though it is stored on the trailer.  I can drop the boat in anywhere and leave it for a week or month and have no worries about growth on the hull.  The paint I used is good for a couple yrs and can be launched and hauled without affecting the effectiveness of the bottom paint.  Not all bottom paints work this way and many must be repainted if the boat is left on the trailer for any length of  time.  So check the paint instructions before buying.

 

A schematic of hose routes and wiring would be good for future reference.  In some areas your hoses and such my be close to the deck.  Screws or other fastenings or cutting into the deck cannot be done in these areas.  Well you know what I'm getting at.  This all has to be worked out for anything you are installing on the deck.  Leaning post, T Top and so on.

 

Peel ply will save you adding many coats of epoxy to fill the weave.  In fact if you do it right you can go straight to a paint such as Interprotect which fills the weave nicely if you did your peel ply job correctly.  Peel off the peel ply and sand and fair any bad spots or ridges left by the peel ply.  Then go straight to the interprotect.  No sanding needed because of the peel ply.  What a work saver.  Interprotect goes on heavy without runs and can be used as a primer for many paints, including perfection.

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The closer I get to flipping this boat the more I think about finishing the interior.  It's my understanding that every square inch of the interior wood should be glassed, then two or three coats of unthickened epoxy to fill the weave, then primer then paint.  This includes the underside of the deck right?  And the underside of the sole?  Which means one must fit, then glass, the underside of the sole before installing...?  .........................just sort of thinking out loud here (in print that is) but any comments are welcome!.............even sarcastic ones :D A question that comes to mind: I assume that the common practice is to fasten the sole down with (marine grade SST,bronze, silica bronze, etc ?), that is any boat that has a sole, to allow access below "decks" i.e. fuel tank, fuel lines, wiring, etc.  Am I wrong? And another one:  It seems that anti-fouling paint is generally recommended for below the waterline, exterior finish.  Why would that be on a boat that normally sits on a trailer, and rarely if ever is left on the water overnight?  Am I reading the wrong material?

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Fishman 38

I have used Dupont Imron on the last 2 boats that I have built, with no issues. The last boat has 700 hrs on it over the past 4 years and other than the usual scuffs, I have had no problems with blisters or peeling. Dupont also does not recommend use below the waterline, however if the boat will spend most of its time on a trailer I feel you would have no issues. Imron is very easy to apply with a spray gun, however I think Dupont has come out with a brush/roller version geared to the marine industry. I to am building the OK 20 and will be using Imron without concern.

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Don't worry fishman, you have been giving such good tips, I don't want to get ahead.

 

I too have been thinking a lot about the interior and making sure to leave access for later repairs. I like the hatch idea, haven't really though logistics since I am still upside down, but could the fuel tank access be in the center console? I assume if everything is really coated well in resin then there would not be a need to get under the deck unless there is need of a major repair. Probably a good idea to take lots of photos with reference points that are visible and a tape measure.

 

On another note, Does anyone know a good source for the sheet foam that has been mentioned in the plan? Is this just styrofoam? 

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I believe one of the early builds had the fuel filler hose up thru the center console, maybe nzlance, but don't remember which one.  Seems there was some concern from some commenter(s) about doing it that way but again don't remember what it was.  I'll see if I can find it.

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Fuel fill should be on the gunnel.  The idea being if there is a spill during filling, it won't end up on the deck or in the boat.  Fuel fills on the gunnel are supposed to have a gutter or dam, so any spills go overboard and not in the boat.  Then the authorities can fine you for causing a fuel spill.

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I just meant access to the fittings, etc. in the event something has to be repaired, instead of a hatch in the floor where it can be seen or removable floor panels. I had the draw tube dry rot off inside my fuel tank in my skiff while I was running this past summer. Couldn't figure out why the boat just died and after drifting 2 miles, searching for anything that could be the problem and saying about every profane phrase in the book, I figured it out. I was able to rig it to get back to the dock, but had a rough time fixing it due to limited access. 

 

Definitely put the vent and fill on the gunnel. 

 

Miyot, Did you bevel your sheer clamp and add the gunnels prior to glassing the boat, or wait until after? 

It appears that the spray rail and tublehome bumper are added afterwards, but prior to finished painting. I assume that they get glassed and faired in as well before painting. 

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