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Belhaven 19 sail # 44


Kyle H.
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Just finished cutting out the two Bulkhead #2's and should be installing them someday this week after work. I am planning on installing Bulkheads #2, then the centerboard case, then Bulkheads #3. Does anyone see any problem with this order?

Scott just PM'ed me to say that this is how it is done. Thanks Scott!

Melting down the remaining wheel weights tonight and pouring the centerboard weight. It is due to snow again for a few days, so will be holding off on some epoxy jobs until it warms a bit.

Kyle

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Kyle,

Bulkhead #4 is just a partition between the quarter berth on the starboard side and the starboard cockpit locker. It is not structural and can be positioned forward or aft of the position shown to change the length of the bunk. For instance if a builder was unusually tall or short they could move bulkhead 4 aft for more bunk length at the cost of a smaller cockpit locker or bigger locker and shorter bunk.

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Kyle,

Bulkhead #4 is just a partition between the quarter berth on the starboard side and the starboard cockpit locker. It is not structural and can be positioned forward or aft of the position shown to change the length of the bunk. For instance if a builder was unusually tall or short they could move bulkhead 4 aft for more bunk length at the cost of a smaller cockpit locker or bigger locker and shorter bunk.

Much thanks, Graham. I will take note of this.

Kyle

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If yuou take your mold you originaly made to make a plaster of paris casting, and submerge it in water and measure how much water it displaces you can figure out what volume of lead you will need.

As a rough and dirty approximation you could also weigh the bilge keel plug. If you used fir to fabricate it figure it weighs about 40% of what an equivalent volume of water would weigh. So you can do the math from there as well.

Rough rule of thumb is that lead weighs roughly 1/2 pound per cubic inch.

For sake of conversation if the plug weighed 5 lbs and made of fir, than 5lbs = .40 x

5 lbs/ 0.40 =x, x = 12.5 lbs of water.

roughly 8 lbs of water to the gallon so you would be looking at roughly 1.5 gallons of lead needed.

A cubic foot of lead weighs around 700 lbs.

A cubic foot of water is roughly 8 gallons.

a cubic foot is 1728 cubic inches.

1 gallon is 216 cubic inches

1 1/2 gallons is roughly 325 cubic inches.

so roughly 170 lbs of lead as it is always better to have more than you need when you start a pour than less.

I doubt your stub will weigh 5 lbs of wood.

And density of wood varies with moisture content of it too... But thats the math..

Give a Man a fish and he will be back the next day for another one. Teach him to fish and he wants to spend all day fishing, drinking beer, and getting nothing else accomplished...

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If yuou take your mold you originaly made to make a plaster of paris casting, and submerge it in water and measure how much water it displaces you can figure out what volume of lead you will need.

As a rough and dirty approximation you could also weigh the bilge keel plug. If you used fir to fabricate it figure it weighs about 40% of what an equivalent volume of water would weigh. So you can do the math from there as well.

Rough rule of thumb is that lead weighs roughly 1/2 pound per cubic inch.

For sake of conversation if the plug weighed 5 lbs and made of fir, than 5lbs = .40 x

5 lbs/ 0.40 =x, x = 12.5 lbs of water.

roughly 8 lbs of water to the gallon so you would be looking at roughly 1.5 gallons of lead needed.

A cubic foot of lead weighs around 700 lbs.

A cubic foot of water is roughly 8 gallons.

a cubic foot is 1728 cubic inches.

1 gallon is 216 cubic inches

1 1/2 gallons is roughly 325 cubic inches.

so roughly 170 lbs of lead as it is always better to have more than you need when you start a pour than less.

I doubt your stub will weigh 5 lbs of wood.

And density of wood varies with moisture content of it too... But thats the math..

Give a Man a fish and he will be back the next day for another one. Teach him to fish and he wants to spend all day fishing, drinking beer, and getting nothing else accomplished...

Thanks for the fish! ;) Scott sent me the mold. Jerry made the mold. Therefore, I have asked Scott to contact Jerry to see if Jerry remembers how much lead weight he needed to fill the mold. I could add water to the plaster of Paris mold, but then it would be a moot melted point!

I'll let the Forum know when I get the answer...wish it was written in the plans, the other weights are.

Kyle

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Kyle I TALKED TO Jerry today and I emailed you his est.

Sounds like this is getting way to complicated. :rolleyes:;);)

Scott

Thanks much Scott. 60-80# sounds good. I am just getting ready to leave for a week in Hawai'i and had planned on bringing back some sand to try Ray's idea. I won't ride my horse over this time... ;)

Kyle

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  • 1 month later...

Scott and I spoke about the centerboard on the Belhaven. He thought that for his sailing, it would have been better to have it retract fully into the centerboard case. I plan to do about the same type of sailing with mine, so was wondering Graham's thoughts on making the centerboard fully retractable. I know that Ray is planning on having his build beachable with the huge tidal changes in his neck of the woods, but Nevada does not have those sailing conditions. Please let me know what you think, Graham, and what modifications I would need to do to make this work.

Much thanks,

Kyle #44

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Scott and I spoke about the centerboard on the Belhaven. He thought that for his sailing, it would have been better to have it retract fully into the centerboard case. I plan to do about the same type of sailing with mine, so was wondering Graham's thoughts on making the centerboard fully retractable. I know that Ray is planning on having his build beachable with the huge tidal changes in his neck of the woods, but Nevada does not have those sailing conditions. Please let me know what you think, Graham, and what modifications I would need to do to make this work.

Much thanks,

Kyle #44

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For me there is no real benefit of having the tripod setup. I do rivers and lakes 95% of the time. I have found myself high and dry on a beach in south Florida once though. The boat simply laid on her ballast and chine till the tide came back in. If your not going to intentualy beach her at low tide frequently and attempt to sail water 14 inches deep I personally can't see any real benefits.

On the other hand if you do much motoring, it is more drag. Which would be more important with an electric motor rather than gas. Also having to rig the trailer to allow for all the protruding fins is another matter to deal with also. Not a big issue true, but something that has to be done. I think it boils down to personal preference.

Ether way she is still I believe at the head of her class as a very versatile and capable 19 foot boat.

Scott

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I guess I just don't see a huge motivating factor to reengineer the c board and trunk to allow full retraction. I can understand not needing the tripod arrangemnt though.

Personally the tripod arrangement is a huge determining factor for me.

My wife does not live well aboard a boat in motion at anchor. We are looking to ground out in the shallows to sleep on nioghts when that is an option and the ability to have the beds level is a desired factor.

Tell you more how it works out in practice in a year or two.

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Much thanks for taking the time to ponder this with me Graham, Ray and Scott. Looks like it will be best to leave it as is, so will do that. And thanks for the well wishes, Graham! :)

It is nice to be able to bounce ideas off all ya'all and to see the different angles of looking at the specifics of the Belhaven.

Kyle

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I can see an advantage to no tripod deal. Without the bilge keel and protruding centerboard (opposite side bilge keel) you can "cant" the boat to fuss with the bottom. You know, scuff grass and marine junk off, or polish `er up for an upcoming speed challenge.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi All ~ Building progress marches on, even in spite of our "Juneuary" weather :rolleyes:

Two questions for the designer: is there a plan for the running rigging on the Belhaven? I have some questions answered from Scott, but wondered what options are out there...

Also, what size plywood (6mm or 9mm) are the two little bulkheads located under the front V berth?

Much thanks,

Kyle #44

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Hi All ~ Building progress marches on, even in spite of our "Juneuary" weather :rolleyes:

Two questions for the designer: is there a plan for the running rigging on the Belhaven? I have some questions answered from Scott, but wondered what options are out there...

Also, what size plywood (6mm or 9mm) are the two little bulkheads located under the front V berth?

Much thanks,

Kyle #44

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