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After ten long years...our weekender finally launched! Kind of.


markfitz
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Some of you probably remember me...I've been frequenting this forum on and off for a lonnnnnng time -- I've been working on this boat once a week with my father since my mother passed away.  Without your help, I doubt it would ever have gotten finished, so thanks to every one here for your invaluable assistance.  Here's a few pictures of the launch:

Screenshot2010-07-04at44406PM.png

Screenshot2010-07-04at44300PM.png

Screenshot2010-07-04at44455PM.png

Screenshot2010-07-04at44339PM.png

We had been worried about getting it on and off the trailer, but it turns out it wasn't an issue, so we didn't even need to use our extender.  

Unfortunately, we never did get the sail up.  We forgot to bring the mast pin!   And as you can see from the first picture, there's this bridge in the way...so you can't put the mast up while you're still trailered and then get to the main lake.  There's a private launch at the other side of the lake we may try next time.  

How do you guys normally do it?  Is it difficult to put the mast up while you're anchored?  We figured putting the mast itself up while floating wouldn't be that difficult, but then realized that unless one of us could walk on water, we didn't have an easy way to attach the front cable for the jib.  Any thoughts or recommendations?  Thanks again!

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I've had several boats that had to have the mast erected. What I used to do was use the jib halyard to hold the mast in place while I made the forestay pin. That allowed me to get the pin in and secured with relatively little difficulty. After the forestay pin is secure, we used the jib halyard for its intended purpose.

When it came time to take the mast down, we reversed the procedure.

This comes in real handy when we do the Hobie 16, That mast is HEAVY now that I am older.

Steve

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I keep the side stays hooked up but the turnbuckles loose. Then I stand on the cabin roof, swing the mast up and attach the pin. The most difficult part of my operation is keeping the lines (so many!) from tangling around each other and around everything else as the mast is being raised.  They should also all be on the proper side of the gaff and boom otherwise I have to redo the whole procedure.

Also I make sure the shackles don't twist around the side chainplates. My mast hinge are ss straps and with the pin attached, it's pretty stable standing upright by itself as long as the water is not too rough; then it's just a matter of balancing out on the bow to hook up the forestay and making sure the shackle pin doesn't go swimming. When the forestay is secured, I tighten and lock all the turnbuckles.

BTW I keep the jib permanently hanked on the forestay so I also have to make sure the jib clew is not attached to the club foot until after the forestay is hooked on.

Best to practice on dry land to work out the devils in the details.

Hope this helps. And hope you enjoy your boat as I do mine.

Rolando

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Congrats on the launch!  It can be a big and rather nerve-wracking day.  I've only managed to launch once last year and have finally done all the mods and repairs that came out of that - http://www.messing-about.com/forums/index.php?topic=6901.msg60413#msg60413.  I'm now waiting for an "almost perfect" day to relaunch.

Being paranoid, I carry spares of the things that can fall overboard including the mast pin.  In fact, I recently finished a spare rudder that I've tossed into the cabin against the inevitable time that I back up with the rudder down.

As far as raising the mast on the water goes, that would require an adventurous sprit and a fair amount of agility.  Also, spare shackles (or tie a string to them) for the ones that you'll lose overboard.  At a dock, I can see it being do-able but run up on a beach or sand-bank might be better.  The boat would be more steady while you're standing on the cabin and you'll have a better chance of being able to find anything you drop.

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Thanks, I will definitely check out that video on Stevenson's site.  We may try again this week.  I've never sailed, and my father has only taken a few lessons, so we're a little chicken to put the sails up to begin with.  Everyone says to just let go of the boom and the tiller if you think you're in trouble, but I'm trying to find an "experienced" sailor to go out with us the first time there's actually some wind..

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Mark,

This topic has come up several times in the last few years.

http://www.messing-about.com/forums/index.php?topic=4351.msg36439#msg36439

Click on the link above and it will bring up a topic.  Nerdy Sailing Stuff that has a drawing I posted back in 2006.  Double click on the drawing and it will enlarge for you.

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The problem with raising the mast is attaching the forestay ... you are balancing on the bow of a little boat that is very "tippy" if you get your weight off the center line, leaning forward over the bowsprit.  I would try it a few times on terra firma to make sure you don't find yourself breaking one of the two cardinal rules:  the sailor stays in the boat.  (The other one is the water stays OUTSIDE the boat). 

But remember that in the water, the Weekender's fine bow means it will tip suddenly if all the weight in the boat is at the bow, and off to one side.  On a trailer, it can be deceptively easy.

But it can be done on the water.  I climbed over the companionway, keeping my weight on the centerline as much as possible, while pushing up the mast.  Grab the forestay and scoot gingerly toward the bow with your body weight low (butt on deck or keep on your knees) while either keeping tension on the forestay or having someone else pushing against the mast to keep it up.  Then lean out and clip the forestay.  Then, don't forget to tighten the shrouds back up!

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Thanks Barry -- we're going to measure the angle again on Thursday, so wish us luck!  Hopefully it's right on the money, but my thought is probably not, since we had to make that bulkhead twice.

turns out our angle is about 96 degrees.....acceptable, or should we try to fix it?

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I would!  Take a 3 degree wedge off the back side of the mast base from base to deck level and re-attach it to the front side of the base.  You will be amazed at how far it will move the trailing end of the boom up.  It will help with tacking, and help in keeping the helm from feeling so heavy when under sail.

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And that is how you make a bent mast base.  Far easier than trying to adjust the bulkhead or mast box angle.  Should move that mast top quite a bit forward and give you good headroom under your boom while sailing.  Not to mention that you will have a better balanced helm.  :cool:

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  I would try it a few times on terra firma to make sure you don't find yourself breaking one of the two cardinal rules:  the sailor stays in the boat.  (The other one is the water stays OUTSIDE the boat). 

You forgot the third Cardinal rule Frank...

Keep the boat floating in the water.  Not hung up on submerged land.

Cardinal rules.

1.) Keep everyone in the boat.

2.) Keep the water out of the boat.

3.) Keep the boat in the water.

I have no problem attaching forestay and tightening turnbuckle out on the water since I added 240 lb ballast bulb to keel.  It counteracts that extreme tenderness as you reach out forward of the bow...

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Unfortunately, we never did get the sail up.  We forgot to bring the mast pin!  

Missing mast pin not  a real problem.  It is there only to hold the mast up until you attach the forestay.  Once that is installed you can sail without the pin.

In a pinch I have used a screwdriver to hold the mast up while I attach the stay.

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