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ricknriver

Outboard Motor/Motor Bracket for BRS15?

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Hate to add a motor, as oars should cover most aux needs, but need safety cushion for grandkids and seniors on rivers and sounds of E. NC. Think I'd like a liftable bracket on the stern for maybe a hopefully v. quiet?? 3.5 Tohatsu or similar 4S (would work on my other sm boats). What would be the best way to reinforce the standard transom if needed? Would a large alu backing plate(s) work or do I need to glass/glue-n-screw in additional wood in the port quarter area? Thought first of a 40-50# electric but after reading many of your posts, some here seem to think extra battery weight, shorter running time, and batt storage limitations (bow? under fwd/miz thwart?) make gas a better choice. Thanks, Rick 

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How beefy is a BRS15 transom? A small outboard doesn't require a lot of beef.  On my racing hydroplanes I built transoms 1 3/4" thick to accommodate the clamp brackets on the racing outboards, 15 c.i. to 20 c.i. and mid-30 hp. the motor board - thick part - was balsa cored to save weight.  Boat speed mid 60s.  I never had a transom break.

If I mounted a small outboard bracket I'd go about 3/4" - 1"  total with big ss fender washers under the bolts/nuts.  I would also beef up any nearby connections, transom to bottom, side, and deck but I wouldn't go nuts with huge timbers, just double the existing glue area.  The actual small motor board on the bracket may have to be thicker for the clamps, and safety tie the clamps after cranked down tight.  If the clamp handles have holes in the end, and they usually do, a large cable tie (zip tie) will do.

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The transom of a BRS is strong enough to support a small outboard as is.  The 3/4" plus plywood across the top and reinforced by the aft seat under that.  Very strong and no knee needed.  I sailed my BRS on the rivers and sounds of Eastern NC and never felt the need for a motor.  It is a sailboat and will move in very little breeze.  Oars can suffice in a pinch but never needed them either.

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The issue of motor is one Paul and I have had many discussions on for our Core Sound 20.  He prefers not to put a motor on her.  He's done WaterTribe challenges which don't allow motor's, he's had success without, and we do have a good set of oars (he's and Alan rowed as long as 8 miles).

For our day and weekend sailing (knowing the weather), and as I learn more and get comfortable with sailing, I'm getting fine without a motor, and even enjoy rowing with the oars when needed.  But we are now planning longer weeklong (vacation) trips at the coast.  These are planned to have flexable (to some extent) routing and scheduling, but it would be nice to have the motor if needed to keep with the plan or at least be able to get home after the week.  And for other unforseen times especially for use in areas with high tidal currents, lots of boat traffic (Beufort area), and docking.

It's a non-ending argument.  But when all said and done, seems a minor issue to me to have it, and just plan not to use it.  If it gives me some comfort of mind, makes me more interested in sailing trips together, than it seems a no brainer. 

Dawn

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Tom

Do you use an outboard on Lapwing?

Bite your tongue :P

I am not as serious about this as it may appear and, like many, when I first started sailing, I thought of putting a small motor on my first 15 1/2' Windmill.  Never did it though.  After sailing many years in the Beaufort area, I never felt that a motor was needed on a small sailboat.  Learning to work the shallows against a strong tidal current is good for the soul. 

I do understand schedules though or at least, I used to before retiring.  Some locals use one of the small ultralight Honda outboards on boats such as an Ensign to get to races on time.  They seem ideal for this kind of use.

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Some locals use one of the small ultralight Honda outboards on boats such as an Ensign to get to races on time.  They seem ideal for this kind of use.

Hmm, when I raced Ensigns in the early 80s it was a class rule that you had to have one on board as part of the safety equipment.  I never could really understand why this was necessary, but it was required to have one on board.  We used to lash it to the mast down below.  The only time we used it was to get to fleet races at other locations like you describe.

Having one or not on a daysailor or camp cruiser is always a debate.  I know the transom on a Spindrift is designed for the outboard it could safely use.  Is there any mention of outboards in your plans about this?  You could always use the Grahamaphone if in doubt  ;)

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This is actually my task today on my Lapwing project. The Suzuki 2.5 is too short to just clamp atop the transom, so I'll be mounting a lifting motor mount.  I added some ply layers to the inside of the transom on that corner, so my total thickness there is now somewhere between 3/4" and 1".  Of the people I've polled, most feel that it's sufficiently strong now.  But, I think I'll add an aluminum plate on the inside as well.  Fender washers would probably be enough, but I just don't want to worry about it as it bounces around back there.

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