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wdbeyer

Some Questions on the Ocracoke 20

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Hi, first timer here.  I've been searching for a 20' center console and fell in love with this design.  I have been considering modifying other 20' flats-style boats to get that "carolina" look, but am feeling they may be too small for coastal fishing/cruising.

This will be a first build for me and I plan on keeping the boat for a long time.

Does anyone know how many of these have been built or in the works?  I know I'll need support throughout the build and don't want to be the only guy out there building this.  The plans are a little pricey compared to the others I've looked at, but in the grand scheme of things maybe not.

Maybe I should buy the CD to get better familiarized first?  I'm looking for some more detail on BOM so I can start some budgeting. 

Any advice is much appreciated.

Wayne

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Hi Wayne, I am glad that you like our Ocracoke 20 design.

The release of the plans has been very recent because we wanted to be thoroughly satisfied with the prototype first, both in performance, function and build ability.

There is a lot of interest in this design and plan # 12 is ready to go out. I don't know how many have been started but I saw some pictures of one this week that was framed up and about ready to put the bottom on.

High cost of the plans! Because of the sophisticated complex shape of the boat it was decided that full size plans were necessary and that they should be on mylar for stability. It costs us around $100 to produce a set of plans as there is 36' of 24" wide mylar in the full size templates.

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Greetings,

I am in a similar position - interested in the Outer Banks 20.

  • Although there is interest, I know of only one built. But this does not scare me off so much. I had some questions and was able to call the designer (Graham) directly and he was very informative.
  • I am building a small day sailor now, the Skerry by Chesapeake Light Craft. A much simpler boat but plans were $90 and these were not full size. Glen-L has similar pricing. With B&B I like that it is not only the plans, you get phone access to the designer. In a pinch, I think that is going to be a big help.
  • I also have been searching the web, and got a few books on the cold molding process. These plans use the "ashcroft" method which is a bit simpler, but I still wish to read up on them

Hope this helps somewhat. Good luck with your choice and build.

John

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Thanks guys!  Graham, I appreciate your explanation on the plan cost ... I didn't realize that they were full size on Mylar.  Certainly will save a lot of time throughout the project.  Also the fact that you monitor these forums, and I assume will be there for those inevitable snafus that will come up, is very reassuring. 

One question, in your opinion, would getting the CD first be a help?

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Wayne,

I did order the CD for the Outer Banks 20 and thought it was well worth the money. It arrived 2 or 3 days after I ordered it (thanks Carla!). I may have to order a different one though - for the Outer Banks it had a lot of photos but it looks like they were taken at two separate times. So I did not get a lot of construction over time shots.

There is the blog of the Marissa, which is very informative but I believe that boat uses "panel" construction rather than the cold molding process required for the Ocracoke and Outer Banks.

Graham,

Do you have a CD with cold molding shots? Most of the sources I am finding use the 3 layer 90 degree method. Or am I making this to complicated? Your explanation of spiling was very straight forward.

John

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I think that you are making too much out of it. You just lay one small plank against it's neighbor. You can see in the picture that the builder is holding the planks to the stringers with drywall screws through ply pads. Towards the bow there is some slight shaping, typically about 1/8" off each end of the edge that butts against it's neighbor.

The forward edge of each plank is left straight. I clamp or staple the plank flat to the stringers and find a scrap of ply that is just thicker than the gap is wide and using a sharp pencil, scribe the aft edge by sliding the ply scrap against the old plank and holding the pencil tight to the forward side of the scrap. When marked it only takes a few strokes of a plane with the plank in the vise and glue it on the boat.lpost-0-129497639507_thumb.jpg

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....When marked it only takes a few strokes of a pane with the plank in the vise and glue it on the boat.l[attachment=1]

a Few strokes with a Pane???

A pane of glass??

I bet a nice sharp block plane would work bettah.. 8)

What's bettah is the Lie Neilson scraper Taunton sent me today for renewing my subscription to Fine Woodworking magazine.  Hah!! :P

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I have hull #12 that Graham just spoke of, I am very happy with the plans so far, and the build is coming along faster than my other stitch and glue boats.  Once Carla told me how to transfer the patterns to the wood i got almost all my frames and frame sides cut in one day.  The last boat I built had full size patterns that were actually the whole frame or stringer etc. The mylar ones that came with the Ocracoke are a lot better and I can see the boat starting to come together in my head because of the detail Graham provided.  Being a First Timer, as long as you have some general Wood working skills and can cut straight lines and curves you will be fine with this boat as your first one.  I plan on posting some pictures of my build very soon.  If you are serious about building then just get started as soon as you can any time you spend thinking about it is lost building time.

You are welcome to E-mail me with any questions.

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Leo, thanks!!!!  I'll email you some questions if you don't mind.  I emailed Graham some questions...but do plan on ordering this week.  I'm a finish carpenter/cabinet guy so the woodworking stuff "should" be okay.  It's the glass I'm gonna have to get acquainted with.

Good luck and have fun.  I'm sure we'll be talking.

BTW, where are you located?  I'm not far from Winston-Salem NC

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I'm in Charleston SC.

If you are a trim Carpenter things should go really fast for you, I ruined a lot of good wood on my first build, the epoxy and glass is simple, after you ruin a few batches you will learn what to do and what not do.

I learned real fast to work on small areas and one thing at a time, that goes for the painting, fairing and any other part of the build also.

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Leo - I live in Mt Pleasant and am ready to order some plans and start building the Okracoke 20 - I am waiting for my building permit to be reinstated by my admiral - too much dust and too much time in the garage from my last boat - but I think she's warming up to the idea of this project provided she can pick the color. How's your build going? I'd love to see some pics or your actual build if possible. Thanks

Bill

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