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Princess Sharpie 28


PeterP
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Not that she's my boat, but here are my thoughts on an interior: v-berth with removable insert forward, followed by a 6' settee to Starbord, 4 1/2' settee to Port, just aft of the Port settee is a small nav station facing athwartship with space for a laptop, aft of the nav station is an enclosed head with shower. (the head has a teak grate you can flip down over it so you can take a shower sitting down without slipping!) Aft of the Starbord settee is the L-shaped Galley, complete with a woodburning stove/heater.

Definately an inboard Diesel, with an engine compartment so well insulated you can happily sleep in the v-berth and barely hear it.

But that's just me. Hah!

Looking very good Sir, thank you so much for documenting your build. It helps us rookies figure out things even if we won't build that exact design.

So far I have only built a Spindrift 9N that isn't even launched yet, but I have the boatbuilding bug for sure!

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Well, I cut out some bulkheads and clamped them in the boat to see how things would feel and look. As mentioned elsewhere I wasn't 100% decided about the head placement. I felt drawn to Garry's "head aft" but who knows -I thought. So putting up a few partitions would clarify things - and guess what. Worked like a charm. The picture clearly shows the forward head as being clearly too tight. A real Houdini job -in fact. Redesigning the entry way to the cabin would give me more knee room but the cost would be a tight rathole of a passage to the bunks. Not me, not now, no way. So by eliminating that I am faced with two possibilities: things had better work out up against the aft bulkhead or it'll be a cedar bucket in the cockpit. PeterP

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Good idea to try things out while changes are easy. Getting "stuck" in a head that is too small in a seaway can be quite interesting, to say the least. Careful thought and trial really is a good thing.

Keep on working and taking pictures. However, we might have done without the one of you sitting on the "throne."

Steve

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That's definitely a smart way to do it, trying temporary bulkheads out to see how it feels I mean.

But keep the bucket handy. You'll be doing a lot of sittin' and thinkin'.

One thing about the aft placement, you should be able to tuck most of the head back behind the companionway ladder so there is less loss of cabin space. Also, you MAY be able to tuck the seat partially under the bridge deck without impairing overhead room.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 weeks later...

Few more jigsaw pieces fitted in. The lightning protection ate up some time as things needed to be researched. In the event I decided to use some 6AWG (which I had on hand) doubled up and to make things more complicated (like I need to do that) I tried to tin the wire for corrosion protection. It tinned just fine - the problem was I tinned the whole braid so I ended up with a solid wire - prone to vibration induced breakage. So after looking at it for a while and not liking what I saw I flashed some green and got some 4AWG which the guy said it was the real deal - marine, tinned etc etc. It proved to be marine & copper but not tinned. I decided to run it anyway to keep things moving along. If it looks like the salt is getting to it it will be easy to fish a new one in. The terminal plate is made out of 3/4" copper pipe hammered flat and tinned. Half in. keel bolt ties it into the lead keel. It was a relief to finally slap the sole down and have it 'poxied in. The white board clamped in the cut out is the height of the bunks with 3.5" foam on top. Happy Turkey Day ya'all. PeterP

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Peter forgive me for using your thread for my own intrests. Your building a beautfull craft.

I have found a quantity of cypress at a very reasonable price and awaiting Grahams input on wheather it will make a good wood for planking of my 25-26 foot cruiser. If he gives me the OK and the thickness I'll start milling strips this winter. Which brings me to my first question.

How thick are the ones for your Princess?

I was going to use the bead and cove method, but last year Graham told me of a differant type that he likes better. I can't remember what it was called. If it can be made easily I'm all ears. I can make the bead and cove with a large router table that I built fairly easy. I'll use a jig to make them uniform.

What kind of milling did you have done?

What do you think about making the joints half lap instead of scarfed? With the joints widely staggered and glassed inside and out along with the bead and cove, I can't see much realizable strength loss vs scarfing them for a hull. I know a single piece of stock is much stronger scarfed but a whole hull is a little differant. I could easily mill in the lap joints to the strips and decrease my build time greatly.

Scott

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Scott, my stock was 5/8" and I ,too, started with bead and cove. However, I dropped the idea very quickly for two reasons: my B&C's were too shallow to be self aligning and it was too time consuming for the marginal increase in glue surface gained. Also, once you do the hard turn of the bilge - where I used the 5/8" x3/4" sticks and start using wider stock ( 5/8" x 1.5" in my case) -the sticks butt up nicely without excessive glue line. I did scarf my stock with a little sled for a small trim saw. As you know I pre-glued my sticks with 5min epoxy from Raka. But I would consider glue up in place. In fact I ended up doing a few that way and got to like it. I did all of the  milling myself. It started out as 2x6x16 Western Red Cedar. Ripped on table saw with a good blade and most were good enough to put on the boat without surfacing. Remember even if they are slick as glass you still have to fair the hull and that means SANDING. And when you're done sanding you'll cover it all up with 12oz cloth. You'll barely be able to tell what is underneath all that glass especially after you skim&fair with glass beads. You are exactly right about the joints not being critical in terms of overall strength but the way I figured at the time a short scarf say 9:1 is as quick to make as anything else and is plenty strong. Most of the ultimate hull strength of course is in the glass - the wood is mostly just a skin separator. PeterP

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Thanks Peter, I would guess my strips would be similar in size. One difference may be in the thickness in the keel area. I wouldn't be surprised if they are thicker around the laminated keel timber. After all she will probably have 2000-2500 pounds of lead fin bolted and glassed to the hull. So there has to be a way to spread that load throughout the hull.

Are you going to foam core the decks and cabin? It's a must for me, I get tired of all the sweat inside the boat. I'll probably do something to the v berth hull sides to help keep the bedding dry.

Scott

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I don't want to speculate on scantlings for your boat - that is for G to figure out. As for my deck - that is going to be straight ply and the cabin top will be a sandwich - possibly Blueboard/ply.  I'll line a lot of my living space to fight condensation but I think the cored hull should take care of most of it. We'll see. PeterP

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  • 3 months later...

I can't believe the date on that last post. It's been a long time -that's for sure. I feel like I have done good work but not much to show for it. Head bulkhead is in. Two cabin top stringers done. Cabin top side scarfed. Good chunk of cabin sole down. Centerboard trunk top brought up to design height. Sleeping quarters paneling installed. The interior is filling up -slow and steady. Pictures of "The Bower" and Airhead below. PeterP

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Looks beautiful Peter.

Sometimes I have difficulty following your posts. I consulted the dictionary to help me out.

The Bower: an attractive dwelling or retreat. a lady's private apartment in a medieval hall or castle.

Such the artist and romantic.

Airhead: now I don't know what the deal is with that. I presume plenty of ventilation. Is it aft just outside the cabin bulkhead?

If you get a chance shoot an aerial photo from about thirty feet up so I can get the overall layout.

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