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"Stitch loose"?


Guest Joe Nelson

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Guest Joe Nelson

Having a bit of difficulty quantifying "loose stitches" for the Core Sound 20.

Devlin recommends using a dowel the diameter of the plywood thinkness you are stitching as a guage to for stitching tension...with holes drilled 1/8" further back from the plywood edge than the thickness. 3/8" plywood would use a 3/8" dowell and holes drilled 4/8" or 1/2" from edge on 6 inch center...2" centers a the stem.

Does this sound reasonable for your design?

Will take lots of pictures this coming weekend at the stitching party. I will send any decent pics on a CD to Graham.

Thanks,

Joe

joe_nelson22@hotmail.com

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Guest Richard Whitney

Joe

I also have Devlin's book. In stitching up my CS17 I left them a bit looser than that and tighten things up once I had opened the panels out. Over the past couple of days the boat is 'settling in' and I come back and some of the gaps have closed themselves as other things align.

whitney@clear.net.nz

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Guest John Burritt

You're on the right track. The idea is loose enough that they don't bind and pull out when you open up the boat. Too close to the edge and the stitches can pull through the wood. At some of the high stress points, you will probably have to double the wires to get the pull you need.

jbncb@coastalnet.com

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Guest Graham Byrnes

It's not that critical. If you are not sure, take two small scraps of 3/8" ply, drill some holes run a couple of ties and open it up to see how it works. You should err on the loose side because you are going to have to tighten it up anyway after it is folded, rather than risk tearing the holes.

We have been using black tie wire (it's cheap, available in most hardware stores and it's soft), the kind they use for re-bar. This week we folded an S12 with slightly smaller wire and it tore the wood in a couple of places, so we finished up the stressed areas with the thicker wire.

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Guest Frank Hagan, Weekender, O

We have been using black tie wire (it's cheap, available in most hardware stores and it's soft), the kind they use for re-bar. This week we folded an S12 with slightly smaller wire and it tore the wood in a couple of places, so we finished up the stressed areas with the thicker wire.

I've wondered if this wire would work. I had read where the use of copper or monel/stainless wire was really for the time when wires would be clipped off and left in the cured resin. But with epoxy, people find it easier to heat the wire slightly, softening the epoxy around the wire, and pull it completely out.

fshagan@ev1.net

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Guest John Burritt

This works, but there's another way to avoid the problem. Instead of filleting the entire seam with the wire in place, "spot weld" between the wire ties on the inside of the seam with thickened epoxy. Then, when its hard, cut and remove the ties and go back and fillet and tape the seam. The "spot welds" hold the panels together the same as the wires did. Just be sure that your welds aren't thicker than the finished fillet to avoid unnecessary sanding.

jbncb@coastalnet.com

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Guest Joe Nelson

It is my understanding that the wires can work out/through from the stresses of flexing, etc.. I plan to tack the panels with an undersized tool that is smaller than the finish fillets and then remove the wires...followed by the finish fillet over the top. If you let the assembly sit for a while, the wood should conform and more less relax to its new shape and not break the unreinforced tack fillets...lets hope!

joe_nelson22@hotmail.com

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Guest Graham Byrnes

I don't like to leave any wire in the boat. Imagine trying to plane a nice radius on the outside of the chine or a flat for the keel and you keep hitting wires (I should be happy because it can't rust?). As John said, tack welding between the wires is my preference as it gives you a clean inside seam with no bumps at the ties. I think copper wire is too weak and the monel and stainless is usually too fine for the stressed areas on CS & Spindrift series. Those areas are centerline (chine, aft of forward bulkhead and near transom).

One of our larger students walked in his CS 17 with the keel area only tack welded and you can imagine the results. In other words you need to treat it with respect until it is glassed.

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Guest Tom Lathrop

I will confirm that just relying on the tack bonds between wire ties to hold when you need to walk inside a larger boat to lay in the filet and glass is a bad idea. It's no fun to see the bottom panels separate. In a large boat, the final filet should be large enough to completely cover the wires without leaving any bulges anyway. In small boats where the seams can be reached from the outside or where there will be no stress, it's Ok to use the tack bonds and remove the wires before fileting.

harbinger@cconnect.net

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Guest Charlie Jones, Lotsa boat

cable ties? I did a 20 foot sharpie from CLC and used the plastic cable ties - on that boat (flat bottomed) they worked well, and cause no problem planing.

Any thoughts on them?

Mbdolfns@nospamtisd.net

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Guest Joe Nelson

I too have used ties. It depends on your budget. Wire is much less expensive for the stregnth. But it is much more feisable to just cut them (plasic) off and epoxy over them. I'll bet I used close to 200 ties on the core sound 20. Used 1/4 roll of $2.99 a spool rebar tie wire. You also will need a larger hole for the plastic ties.

joe_nelson22@hotmail.com

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