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So anyway..


Konrad in Lincoln
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..there I was when I found a slice of processed cheese down the side of the bed. While I was eating it I got to wondering whether or not it'd be worth it to trim the hedges. So it was up the road, turned right last Thursday, and BAM! I ran out of gas. There was also a single slice of Terry's chocolate orange, but the dog got that after I lifted the bed. Same mutinous critter who gulped a whole stick of butter off the counter a year ago. Could be worse, he came running down the hall last month with a steak knife in his mouth. Olives cause ear hair, don't you know.. But let us consider what Chitlins are: They are hog intestines.

Crimony, what a night.

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Actually, its the city slickers who should be the most accepting of foods like tripe and chitlins. it was the immigrants who migrated to the cities for work who were creative enough to discover these foods because they were so poor. they ate mushrooms, snails, clams, chicken kidneys, liver, mussels, etc. whatever they could get free or cheap. there was a time when lobster was so plentiful and cheap, it was fed to prisoners to save money.

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I've got a friend/co-worker who is from NY (Long Island) and recently she was waxing reminiscent about the bounty they used to get from LI Sound - She was talking about the crab, eel, etc that they used to bring home for dinner after a day in the canoe and there were a few rural-raised (North Carolina) locals who were completely disgusted at the thought of eating eel (these folks were raised on chitlins) because it was basically a watersnake. I grossed them out further by extolling the virtues of rattlesnake. :)

Rural or urban - one man's trash is another man's treasure. I'll have another lobster, please. No, Wait! How about some a bit of ostrich? Or a bison steak? Aww, now I'm going to bed hungry... :)

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When I lived in New Zealand, I got to eat lots of different seafood. When I lived up by the Bay of Islands, we ate a lot of tuna for breakfast. However, it didn't look or taste anything like any tuna I had ever tasted. After a few weeks I found out that the Mario word "tuna" meant eel.

The boy that live there with us would go the to local stream and bring home some fresh water eels. I rather liked the taste of it, but it surprised me that I had been eating eel and never knew it. Even though they ate a lot of things raw, I always had "tuna" cooked, so I wouldn't know what eel sushi is like.

The raw sea food I didn't like was octopus. The base of the suckers are kind of hard and not very palatable.

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Phil

You remind me of when I holidayed in NZ some years ago (I have Maori friends over there and I was best man for their wedding). One of the best foods I had over there was smoked fish, cold, between two slices of bread.

They lived near the water in Auckland and would go down to the smokehouse at the docks and pickup 4 or 5 fish, wrapped in newspaper and bring them home to eat straight away. I'm sure it tasted better because of the fact that it was 'simple' food - you would simply grab a slice of bread, pick the fish off the bone with your fingers, put it on the bread, whack another slice over the top and voila - a meal fit for a king!

Andrew

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Eel sushi = Unagi.

Mmmm... Good stuff. It IS cooked, though. The word "Sushi" doesn't mean "raw" - I think it actually translates as something like "vinegared rice" (please correct me if you know better). The meat is incidental. Things like eel and crab are cooked although some meat on sushi is raw (tuna, for example).

You people keep making me hungry. I'm off to eat some more wasabi peanuts.

And hopefully Saturday evening I'll be dining on FRESH deer heart (ew, gross!) :)

So I still don't know what this thread is about - How do I know when I get off-topic?

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