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R&D at this years Mess-about


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Borrowing R&D (research and duplicate) from Steve who unashamedly stole it from Jay.

 

This is not earth shattering but when I saw Amos' neat mosquito screen installation on the forward side of his bulkhead I thought "dummy, why didn't I think of that?" When I was thinking about making my screen I was looking from inside the boat. I made a thick ply frame and glued the mesh to the face, it works. The down side is that every time I get under way I take it out so that I can screw the 6"plastic hatch in. It is not hard to do but it takes a screw driver and I have another piece of clutter to store until I need it.

 

Every time I get under way I make sure that the lockers under the berths are dogged and the hatches are sealed just in case I get knocked down. It has not even come close yet but if it did It could end badly as I am regularly far from help. I now have a mast head float which should add another layer of safety. I carry my canned food and tools under the bunks and my battery is just in front of the ballast tanks and I cruise with the ballast tanks full. I intend to capsize test her again in her current trim. I have driven her hard.

 

One of the things that I really like on Carlita is her white paint above gunwales. It is always cool even on a hot summers day with the three hatches open. The red hull is mostly in the shade. Unfortunately we cruise in one of the buggiest places on earth. With screens in place of the companionway wash boards and both hatches closed and the screen over the 6" hatch forward I am good. Often after I tidy the boat after a days sail I grab whatever I want out of the ice box to eat and dive down below and try to kill whatever came in with me. The 6" screen might not seem like much but I have 12V Hella fan that clamps to the deck stringer just aft of the screen blowing air at me when it is hot and venting out through the companionway screens.

 

The forward bulkhead on the mk3  has the 6" hatch tucked up under foredeck to the starboard side and stays dry even in driving rain. The green lines mark the forward tabernacle and the anchor well.

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   I drew a square of 1/4" 6mm ply and chopped off the corners. I drew five strips of 6mm ply with two at the bottom staggered about 3/16" to form a rabbet which holds the screen in place. A washer under the turn button at the top should make it easy to turn and allow for easy removal.

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I appreciate Richard’s additions to his building of Avocet, CS17m3 hull #6 (I bought it from him in late 2021.)  He had placed two round six inch sealing ports (with screens on the outside) in the forward bulkhead and fashioned a cloth air scoop that can stand over the anchor locker to capture breeze coming into the bow when anchoring. Don used this air scoop last winter when he sailed with Avocet in Florida.  Here’s a photo with the yellow air scoop… (he also apparently likes to fly his pants 😂😞

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(I did not do any over nights on-board this year… work kinda gave “the boot” to much of this year’s sailing plans.)  

 

Richard also installed two rectangular window-ports on each side of the cabin that tightly seal but also can be opened, again having permanent screens on the outside.  He made a large square screen for the companionway… I believe it is in for the above photo.  All of this provides lots of potential for air movement through Avocet’s cabin.  I plan to make good use of this ventilation next season. 😁
 

Graham, I continue to increasingly like and appreciate both of my Core Sounds, even as they are sitting in winter storage. Thank you for creating your business, designing great boats, and making it possible for amateurs like me to successfully build them at home. 👍
 

My family enjoyed playing with “the fleet” last summer:
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One if the things I enjoy about the Messabout is doing my own R&D.  This year, I was also given assignments by friends who couldn’t attend.  (I won’t mention any names, but their Initials are Janice Coté and Ted Johanson.). I also took notes on that canoe with pedal propulsion.  The trimaran I’m building (on the Main Forum) has pedal steering, and this boat had some nicely executed mechanisms.  What was the owner’s name?  

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That was me, Don. The boat is a Thistle design by Harry Bryan (https://www.harrybryan.com/collections/plans/products/thistle-12).  It was in WoodenBoat Small Boats magazine in 2014 and I decided to try to build it. I stretched it to 14' and had a real learning experience (never built a glued lapstrake boat before). Photos below are Harry in his 12' boat and me in mine (I did not make the sail rig). It works -- not fast but easy to make it go. I tell folks it moves at mosey speed.  Too windy to mess with it at Messabout.

 

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The Messabout is great for R&Ding.

 

I plan on installing an electrical system and then duplicating Skeena's ballast tank/bilge pump system.  The Anderson bailers I have actually work pretty well, they are simple and efficient, but since I'm putting an electrical system in anyway I may as well duplicate Steve's setup which is significantly faster than the bailers.

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Amos, It's funny that you mention that pump system. On the Thursday we sailed to B & B as you were heading up the river I was wondering why I felt like I was standing still. I turns out I'd not properly dogged my Andersson bailer (I only have one) down the day before and it had leaked all day/night and the tank was filled to the waterline. A quick flip of the valve and electrical switch and it was empty pretty quick.

 

I'll make a quick video this weekend to show how my son Teddy and I set it up.   

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8 hours ago, AmosSwogger said:

The Messabout is great for R&Ding.

 

I plan on installing an electrical system and then duplicating Skeena's ballast tank/bilge pump system.  The Anderson bailers I have actually work pretty well, they are simple and efficient, but since I'm putting an electrical system in anyway I may as well duplicate Steve's setup which is significantly faster than the bailers.

The Messabout can also be bad on your wallet when you get in the group of idle handed wood addicts these days, a slightly  dusty shop with stacks of full sheet plywood, an active computer screen with boat drawings  and one leader with "special suggestions". There is are always room for improvements , no matter what your fully built hulls may be waiting for your next trip. 

 

Good to catch up with some of your guys on this thread and forum again. Someone was promising follow up reports of the week and weekend. [hint, hint]  Nick, good to see your re-creation in action.

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Here's another idea. During the build I was looking on the inside of the anchor locker and noticed the cover didn't seat on the inside. The arrow below is the lip that the cover seals on. I measured and realized I had enough room to make a disk/screen and pop it in there without affecting the sealing. It's a snug fit that can just be pushed out from the locker side for any reason. I leave it right there when I put the cover on. 

 

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Oyster is right. The Messabout is costing me money! I already ordered some cleats that Amos had on Larissa. I also realized a table in the cabin would be a nice add so I'm working on a plan for that. My bug screen for the forward cabin hatch needs improvement. Some of the trailers had walking planks, the list goes on. 

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Don,

 

You bring up one of the advantages of creating your own boat, you can fit it out to make it work the way you use it.

 

I have a tricolor masthead navigation light on the main mast which works very well. To remove the mast from the boat I have to have a "weatherproof" plug near the base of the mast. These plugs become troublesome over time due the corrosive environment we operate in. I find that if I smother the terminals in dielectric grease and mount the plug under the foredeck out of the weather I get trouble free service so far. The plug has to be polarized which means that it can only go together one way. With the screen removed I can reach through the port and view the plug so that I can plug it in the right way. It is very awkward trying to plug it in reaching in blind kneeling on the foredeck.

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