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Did we miss the question about the dagger board? It goes in with the dull, rounded edge in front and the sharp edge trailing - like an airplane wing.

 

About downhaul tensioning, it should be just tight enough to smooth out the crease that runs from the forward end of the yard to the aft end of your boom (throat to clew). On the same post as your dagger board question, the second photo shows creases of this type.  See also https://www.storerboatplans.com/tuning/lug-rig-setup/what-is-that-crease-in-my-lugsail-how-to-diagnose-and-fix/.  with my balance lug, when I get that crease to pop out, I can feel the sail really catch the air.

 

BTW, if you take raise the sail almost all the way up the you'll be able to see where you're going under the boom.  Leave a few inches at the top to allow the yard to swing easier.

 

Enjoy!

Bob

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4 hours ago, Paul356 said:

-You don't exactly need a parrell on the top sprit, but it's good to keep it near the mast.  You can do this with the halyard if you tie the end of the halyard out near the front of the sprit, then run it around the mast and back to a block on the sprit at the normal attachment point before sending it through the block on top of the mast and down the mast for hoisting. 

I've tried this and it works fairly well but only when fully hoisted. A parrell is actually better especially if you have a reef. My parrell (a light line with wooden beads from the craft shop) stays on the mast trapped between the halyard fitting and the snotter attachment. It has a small snaphook to attach to the yard so only takes a second to rig.

Cheers

Peter HK

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Thanks to everyone for their insightful replies. I'm trying to read and catch up (and adding a lot of items to the boat todo list)

 

Yesterday I did get the yard hauled up further, which definitely improved sight lines (no more constantly bending over to see). Got extra practice doing this going under a bridge low enough that the mast cleared but the yard didn't...

 

Judging by the amount of emphasis on downhaul tension and my lack of paying attention to it, I'm sure that's an area I need to do a better job with. Looks like I have a 2-to-1 setup (cleatable line goes up through boom, through sail tack eyelet, and back down to tie off at boom). I'll try tensioning the bejesus out of that next time I'm out, hopefully get rid of the sail crease.

 

Poor sailing skills comedic story for yesterday: managed to smash up daggerboard a bit on rocks in a submerged breakwater. But it doesn't look bad enough to do anything about, perhaps:

IMG_20220917_085313.thumb.jpg.4a9f0827aea9ffe074c77611488a62aa.jpg

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15 hours ago, naf said:

managed to smash up daggerboard a bit on rocks in a submerged breakwater. But it doesn't look bad enough to do anything about,

No

Wait till you really take a chunk out of it- like we all have- before bothering to repair it😉

When you do repair it some on this forum recommend soaking a piece of line in epoxy and gluing that on the edge to reinforce it. I haven't tried it. 

Since people are recommending extra reinforcement you can rest assured this is a common event.

Cheers

Peter HK 

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Since the photo is here, and the question was asked— I believe the left side of this d/b is the forward edge, right?

And here’s the video on embedding a nylon cord into the leading edge of your d/b.  I now do this on all my rudders as well as c/b’s and d/b’s.  It’s very durable.  And when it gets really bad, you can always remove it with a heat gun.

 

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37 minutes ago, Don Silsbe said:

Since the photo is here, and the question was asked— I believe the left side of this d/b is the forward edge, right?

 

 

That is my thinking now as well. I had been putting it in the other way, with the thought that the more rounded profile would help push it up in the case of groundings (guess not, ha).

 

Also I just read this old entry from Terry Haines on the woodenboat forum:

Quote

> Seems like there is a need for someone to invent the equivalent of a shear bolt for the dagger board ...

The small sailboat I completed late last year has a vertical daggerboard. The part of the DB that remains in the trunk has a forward edge that slopes back several inches at the top. The idea is to allow the DB to pivot slightly on contact with an underwater object, releasing the hold-down cord so it can rise in the trunk

 

Makes sense in terms of the angle notch at the top of the DB being on the front, but I don't see how the auto-release would work when the hold-down cord runs parallel to the DB slot. There's nowhere for it to slide out of, unlike say if the hold-down cord just ran across the rear half of the slot.

 

I'll have to go sailing and try running into some stuff to test it out 😉

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That’s the down-side to a d/b.  They’re much simpler than a c/b, and take up less room.  But they are not bottom-friendly.  
 

My approach is to let the d/b be the sacrificial part.  It is more easily replaced and repaired than the trunk.  So, I do “the rope trick”, and forget about it.  Since you’re still building, this is a good time to beef up the trunk, to make it more impact resistant. A little glass tape embedded into a fillet at the lower-aft and upper-forward corners will help the trunk to weather the storm.  Just make sure you don’t encroach on the d/b’s work zone.  These king posts are also a great place to use something hard like Ash.

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latest outing report: no mishaps, so no good stories. 

 

i tried my new homemade vhs-tape windex mounted on a short pex pipe on the breasthook. problem is that the sail is always in the way, duh. i think i might go back to a pig stick and flag on the mast (provides low bridge clearance warning also). too bad cause the blue pex pipe matches the boat's paint job pretty well.

 

too scared to try my homemade tiller lock (a block of wood with a j-hook in it with a wing nut to tighten) since winds were a tad gusty off the gulf of mexico today 😉

 

question: is anyone stupid enough to run their halyard to the rear of boat this small, instead of cleating it on the mast?

it seems like it would be easier to drop the sail when single-handed dock/beaching or going under a bridge or whatever. raising the sail away from land/dock would certainly be less treacherous i think without having to climb up to the front and run back quickly?

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I understand what you’re saying about raising the sail.  In a small boat, it is quite tipsy up forward.  It’s certainly worth a try.  What I like about wooden boats is that you can try stuff.  If you don’t like it, you remove it, use a little filler and paint, and nobody’s the wiser.

With regards to tiller lock, I did something like this on my boat.  Only difference is that I put it underneath the tiller instead of on top.  Works great!

 

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I can't tell whether your block-hook-wingnut rig has this problem, but it's essential that the tiller "lock" doesn't actually lock  the tiller.  It should just add friction - so you can move the tiller if you need to.  I use just a cord with a wrap or two around the tiller.  It's not perfect, but it works well enough for me to leave the tiller alone for a minute or two.  The next level would be to add some bungee to maintain tension.

 

Running the halyard back to where you can release it is a great idea.  It's important to add blocks and cleats to keep it tidy, though.  Bad things can happen if your halyard gets tangled with the main sheet or your feet or something.

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Steve Warfle had a bungee tiller lock system installed on the boat he sold me.  It's like the one shown in the video, but instead of the hard rope with the S hook, it's a bungee and has a smaller clasp on it.  It's perfect; you can use it to lock the tiller, but I also use it sometimes when sailing just to take some travel out of the tiller, it is less work.

 

Also, mount it all on the bottom of the tiller, it looks much better and doesn't get in the way. 

 

I am considering putting a clasp on the line that goes across.  Mine is tied, and usually not in the way, but I have short arms and reaching after to start the motor is a stretch for me.

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I run the halyard on my CS 17 back to the helm.  The halyard comes down the mast, through a small harken single block (as a turning block) on the deck near the mast, then through a couple of bullseyes to lead it aft, then into a clam cleat with a keeper-thing on it so that when I release the halyard, it will run free and not keep re-engaging with the clam.  I will try to get a picture later today.  It works well.  Halyard is 1/8" yacht braid, which is plenty.  The downhaul, snotter and two reef lines also all come back, the same way.  I have the cleats mounted about mid-way back on the boat, on the side deck (or I guess it's really the coaming).  I can reach them with my right arm and still run the tiller with my left arm.  To let the sail down, I just uncleat everything and let the lines run, basically.

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I took these photos of my system.  I used odds & ends I had in my hardware box.  You’ll notice first that it’s on the underside of the tiller.  Also, there’s a short piece of bungee in the tensioning line.  This gives me a wider range of adjustment.  F0B22494-44EC-43DD-9768-B95F37A19475.thumb.jpeg.a2a47177f2ef05b61d3f5b36bf59743f.jpeg

This is how it looks under tension.F4A544BD-A876-4437-AD23-60E208524667.thumb.jpeg.024fd693592c308b8686a999801974bb.jpeg

 

The green bridle clips on and off at the gunwales.  Also, to quickly disengage the system, just unsnap the snap hook from the bridle.2C3C2777-E775-4711-AB13-81E202F53EFA.thumb.jpeg.3365faa2926aa337ecd322fa1b12df03.jpeg

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7 hours ago, Don Silsbe said:

I took these photos of my system.  I used odds & ends I had in my hardware box. 

 

Thanks for the video/pics. I made a pale imitation today (my hardware box has less boat stuff than yours I imagine):

 

IMG_20220930_141040.thumb.jpg.acc1ff5ed29132cd17ff11eedfa9b356.jpg

 

IMG_20220930_141026.thumb.jpg.ff05e373730c4a229e110979114dd801.jpg

 

I still haven't figured out what you mean by "storer wrap" in your previous photo though, btw

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You nailed it!  If you add a little bungee cord in your tensioning line, you'll be able to

make finer adjustments.  
 

RE:  ”Storer Wrap”

 Meester included a link in one of his posts.  It was to a Michael Storer website.  (He’s the God-of-All-Things-Balanced-Lug.)  On this website, Storer suggests wrapping the halyard around the yard.  Here’s the link: 

https://www.storerboatplans.com/tuning/lug-rig-setup/what-is-that-crease-in-my-lugsail-how-to-diagnose-and-fix/

 

Bu I think a simple loop of line around the mast will hold the yard in place.  Caveat:  I have no experience on which to base this statement.  Try stuff, and decide for yourself.  That’s part of the fun!

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By the way, I have the same sort of rubber tiller extension on my Bay River Skiff.  They are notorious for cracking and breaking with age.  Because of this, I take the extension off the boat when not in use.  It is only under stress when sailing.  That way, it will never (?) fail while I’m using it.

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23 minutes ago, Don Silsbe said:

You nailed it!  If you add a little bungee cord in your tensioning line, you'll be able to

make finer adjustments.  
 

RE:  ”Storer Wrap”

 Meester included a link in one of his posts.  It was to a Michael Storer website.  (He’s the God-of-All-Things-Balanced-Lug.)  On this website, Storer suggests wrapping the halyard around the yard.  Here’s the link: 

https://www.storerboatplans.com/tuning/lug-rig-setup/what-is-that-crease-in-my-lugsail-how-to-diagnose-and-fix/

 

Bu I think a simple loop of line around the mast will hold the yard in place.  Caveat:  I have no experience on which to base this statement.  Try stuff, and decide for yourself.  That’s part of the fun!

 

Oh, yeah I have a note to try looping the halyward up through the yard and around the mast and back to the end of the yard. I was going to wait and try it at the same time I get a longer halyard to try running it back to the 'cockpit'.

 

I'll give the bungee thing a try too. And if that silly tiller extensions breaks off it won't be the end of the world since I'm not coordinated enough to actually use it 😉

 

Here's what successful tiller-locking looked like tonight (yes I tied it on the wrong side of the traveler line and didnt fix it, but it still worked):

IMG_20220930_182308.thumb.jpg.17937a5ce9b22a919636a06274c83253.jpg

 

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There is a reason why the halyard is led aft. The boat has single line reefing, if rigged properly. It is very convenient to be able to reef the boat from the helm in seconds.

 

Don is correct, the left side in that picture is the leading edge. The reason that the top of the board is angled is to not foul the boom vang when the board is raised. While I prefer a centerboard, I put daggerboards in small boats because they take up less room.

 

I have sailed daggerboards in shallow water a lot and the tips of my boards can prove it. While you have to pay a bit more attention with a daggerboard, I do not think that it is a big PITA. In dodgy water I sail with the board half up unless I am racing. I once won the around Carrot Island race in my Spindrift 10 doing that. There was a foul tide and light air. I was able to short tack in close behind a sand bank while the larger deeper boats struggled against the tide out in deeper water. Yes I made a bit more leeway but it was acceptable.

 

You need to learn to get coordinated with that tiller extension. Unless you can hike out on the rail and move your weight forward, you will always be under performing.

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