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New Mandy owner


naf
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Hello all,

 

Just here to announce that I am the proud new owner of an Amanda 12!

 

sea_otter.thumb.jpg.3dbc7e1175423ae6ebc6383a2f8e7849.jpg

 

Haven't tried out the sail yet, but I did take it for a quick row yesterday to test car launching and make sure she floats (which would be more of a concern if I was the builder I guess). All good.

 

Only problem so far is I can't figure out where I should attach a line near the stern to have a second tie off point to the pier while I deal with the trailer at the launch. Do people just attach a d-ring on the transom next to the traveler ends, or a horn cleat to the stern gunwale, or am I missing something easier?

 

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The easy way is a hole through the breasthook.  (Round off the edges with a router.). E9A754AC-807D-402B-9471-D7922A654727.thumb.jpeg.f1b9756c2375b70c1eeb7aa3df0f8254.jpegJust slip your line through and tie a stopper knot under.  That only works if you have some extra blue paint. I have D-rings on my larger boat.  The sheet likes to hang up on them from time to time.  Cleats would be worse.

 

The Amanda is a fine boat.  I think you will enjoy her.

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1 hour ago, naf said:

Only problem so far is I can't figure out where I should attach a line near the stern to have a second tie off point to the pier while I deal with the trailer at the launch. 

 

I suggest puting holes in the middle of your transom knees.  This gives you both stern quarters to add lines, and no hardware to snag on things or bruise oneself on.

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On 9/8/2022 at 11:02 AM, Don Silsbe said:

The easy way is a hole through the breasthook.  (Round off the edges with a router.). Just slip your line through and tie a stopper knot under.  That only works if you have some extra blue paint. I have D-rings on my larger boat.  The sheet likes to hang up on them from time to time.  Cleats would be worse.

 

The Amanda is a fine boat.  I think you will enjoy her.

 

On 9/8/2022 at 11:07 AM, Hirilonde said:

I suggest puting holes in the middle of your transom knees.  This gives you both stern quarters to add lines, and no hardware to snag on things or bruise oneself on.

 

Its been raining here, so I took both your advice and got those holes drilled in the transom knees. No router (or blue paint yet), so a step-bit + sandpaper method was as good as I can do for for making the holes beveled.

 

Added some temporary bumpers from foam pipe insulation and a few miscellaneous trailer enhancements while I was at it.

 

Hopefully the weather will cooperate this weekend so I can come back with actual sailing-related questions and/or comedic failure  stories.

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Got out on the water today. Nice light breeze to figure out what I was doing.

 

1.thumb.jpg.370fe58d529e33f292048c949af8d0cd.jpg

 

Everything went smooth, no comedic failure stories.

Only one planned-but-maybe-not-planning-on-doing-it-so-quickly jibe.

 

As promised, more questions:3.thumb.jpg.0503b2727d241fc405dcc4ac702bfa7b.jpg

 

Is this about how high the sprit should be raised, or should it go all the way to the shackle at the top of the mast? I set it here initially and just tightened the downhaul, but I was thinking maybe I should have gone higher to raise the boom more (and have to duck less)?

 

EDIT: also, is there a right/wrong orientation to drop in the dagger board?

Edited by naf
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Second sail outing today. Got a chance to practice a single-handed (unplanned) capsize recovery drill next to the dock. Dripped a little blood on the sail, whoops. Luckily boat is very easy to right and my waterproof bag was tied on well. If it becomes a habit I might need to install a drain plug.

 

On the good side, I did get to see an air show and a dolphin.

 

Still not sure if I'm raising the sail correctly, although in super light wind I think it might not ever look right.

 

Sailing question: is there a way to "heave to"  with only the lug sail?

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You should be able to heave to (at least more or less sit in one spot) by letting the sail out nearly perpendicular and letting it luff, then playing with finding a spot to lock the tiller so you don't either drop downwind or come up and about.  Usually that will mean holding the tiller a bit to wind, but you'll need to experiment both with sail position and tiller position.  I leave my centerboard down, although apparently some folks pick up the board.  I've never tried that.  Every boat is different, eh?  You come out of it by pulling in the sail and using the tiller as needed.

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I'll give that a try next time I'm out (and its time for a sandwich).

 

Maybe before then I can rig up a j-hook or u-bolt on the tiller to act as a tiller lock, since my "lash a rope around the tiller twice" system seemed a little too finicky to rely on in the sort of pickles where it would be most useful. Might have to sacrifice the tiller extension to make room, but luckily I'm not coordinated enough to use it with any confidence anyways.

 

About the height the halyard is supposed to go up, does anyone have a picture of where their yard meets the top of the mast? There's nothing that's supposed to connect it to the mast (a parrel?), correct? (I may have called the yard a "sprit" before, showing my ignorance. oh. ha(u)l-yard. i get it.)

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I “think” the sail gets hauled all the way up, and then the downhaul is tightened.  If this is done, I think the yard will be held close to the mast, eliminating the need for a parrel.  I didn’t want to comment on this, because I have only sailed this rig once.  Nate at the shop has sailed their Mandy.  I’d check out photos from past Messabouts.

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2 hours ago, Don Silsbe said:

I “think” the sail gets hauled all the way up, and then the downhaul is tightened.  If this is done, I think the yard will be held close to the mast, eliminating the need for a parrel.  I didn’t want to comment on this, because I have only sailed this rig once.  Nate at the shop has sailed their Mandy.  I’d check out photos from past Messabouts.

 

Good idea. Unfortunately, I just looked through all the albums and I couldn't find a picture from the right angle to tell. Apparently people frame photo to show the boat and captain, not the important stuff like the top of the mast, ha.

 

Damn, i see the 2022 messabout is next month. If only I wasn't 13 hours away, I would just show up and peek around myself...

 

EDIT: oh i see theres a signup sheet, no mandy's on the list yet. guess that wasn't a good plan

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My lomited wxperience with a balanced lug is that the downhaul requires a hefty tug.  A 4:1 system ir higher is recommended by Storer.  I know that this is a standing lug rig, and not aa balanced.  But the luff still requires significant tension.  The balanced lug rig I sailed did not have this.  The luff billowed, and kept me from coming about.  Not good.

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Our volunteer shop produced a Caravelle designed by Clint Chase with a rig similar to Mandy's.  Caravelle's boom is not tied to the mast, but I don't think that makes a difference to what follows:

--Hard down haul tension is a must, but a 2-1 setup is plenty.  When the downhaul is set, the whole sail swings back and also creates a hard luff, which as Don noted is a must.

--You don't exactly need a parrell on the top sprit, but it's good to keep it near the mast.  You can do this with the halyard if you tie the end of the halyard out near the front of the sprit, then run it around the mast and back to a block on the sprit at the normal attachment point before sending it through the block on top of the mast and down the mast for hoisting.  You'll need to do some adusting, natch, but it really works wonders, especially when the sprit is on the downwind side of the mast.  In practice, you lay the sprit and the "sprit line" out on opposite sides of the mast hole before you step the mast, then step the mast between the sprit and the "sprit line," so that they'll run up opposite sides of the mast when you hoist the sail.  Wish I could describe it better.  Clint describes it in the plans, and I hope he forgives me for clipping this bit out of the plans:  image.png.4d93ba87a55e9db127c8733f19225ca2.png

(I don't think it was original with him??)

Clint also refers to another designer's site, Michael Storer, for more info on lugsails, and I recall this was pretty helpful,  http://www.storerboatplans.com/GIS/GISRigging.html 

 

Well, that's what I know.  Best wishes.

 

 

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