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Pair of FROGs


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Ravenswood—low volume and standard. The LV has been varnished with poly urethane and is ready to be covered.

 

With the frames cut and stringers made, the second on went together quickly—three days from frames in the jig to FROG. It’s startling how fast they come together when everything is prepped. Laminating and then sanding and finishing the coaming is the slowest part.

 

Takeaway from the coaming is to use very thin, straight-grained stock. I used African mahogany (wood store had a nice piece of 8/4) but next time I’d use maple or oak as Jeff recommends. Also cut it very thin. The book said 3/16ths, I went with 1/8, but next time I go for 3/32s. 1/8 was as thin as I could get on my table saw but if you have access to a band saw set up for re-sawing go thinner.

 

The mahogany looks great but the grain was a little squirrelly. I don’t think it was worth the extra effort.

 

Looking forward to getting them launched now!

Hal

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

The green one, now named Kermit, was skinned and primed in time for our trip from Colorado to the Upper Penninsula of Michigan. The blue one (Grover) made the trip as a bare frame.
 

We skinned it after arriving and then painted them both. We used Rustoleum Farm and Implement paint in John Deere green and Ford blue.

 

Frame weights were 18 and 19 pounds respectively. We haven’t  weighed them fully finished with foot and back braces but I’m guessing they’re sub 25. They are extremely responsive in the water and the low volume Ravenswood fits my wife well.

 

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@Hal Hammond

 

Very nice.  I'm reading the description of the Ravenswood LV on kudzucraft and the low stability discussion.  How do you perceive the stability related to other kayaks?  I'm thinking this might be my next kayak build.  I like the lighter weight and shorter length relative to my Vardo. 

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My only other experience is in tubby plastic boats and super tippy flat water rowing shells.

 

The Ravenswood LV and STD are certainly  less stable but not a problem once you’re in them. You do have to take care entering and exiting though. 
 

My wife is 105 lbs and the LV feels really comfortable for her. Same for me at 160 in the STD. They point and track very well. Basically they goes where you point them,  regardless of wind. They’re really easy to paddle and inspire confidence, even in mild whitecaps.

 

In a rowing shell, you simply tip over if you let go of the sculling oars. In the Ravenswood, you can sit comfortably with the paddle resting on the coaming, even in wind and waves.

 

My wife has less experience on the water but adapted to her LV within minutes. She loves her kayak!

 

We wet launch in knee deep water. The trick is to get one leg in and extended and drop your bottom into the boat quickly. If you hesitate, you’ll likely roll unless you have really good balance or if you’re bracing on something solid. I dumped it once but my wife, being more flexible than  me, hasn’t had a problem.

 

I haven’t tried her kayak yet but will once we return to Colorado. We’ll weigh them both too. 

Guessing they’re pretty light. I can easily lift them into the cartop racks on our minivan—that was one of our critical goals, that they be easily cartop-able. Mission accomplished.

 

HH

 

 


 

 

 

 

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On 7/15/2022 at 1:34 PM, Hal Hammond said:

We wet launch in knee deep water. The trick is to get one leg in and extended and drop your bottom into the boat quickly. If you hesitate, you’ll likely roll unless you have really good balance or if you’re bracing on something solid. I dumped it once but my wife, being more flexible than  me, hasn’t had a problem.

Hal:

Nice boats! The trick to getting into and out of them is to place your paddle behind the cockpit and use it as an outrigger, keeping your weight on the paddle side. This can be done in just a few inches of water at a beach or off a float. Video is attached. You can find more elegant videos on YouTube. Fair winds!

 

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Scott,

I had a chance to paddle my wife’s Ravenswood LV. I like it a lot!

 

I’m 5-9 and 165. The LV sits a bit lower and is less stable than the STD but the tighter fit is nice. It’s more like you wear the boat instead of the boat wearing you.

 

 

Two pics, me in the green LV and then me in the blue STD with my wife in the LV. If you’re anywhere near Denver and would like to try either one, let me know.

HH

 

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I really liked the Short Shot too. I was planning to build two until I found that here was no short shot LV. 
 

165 is on the line so it depends on how you plan to use it. If you’re going to load it, go bigger. If not, then maybe LV. If I were starting over with the knowledge I have now, I’d probably go with two LVs since we paddle pretty light.

 

Btw, this is what Jeff said…

 

HH

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