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Question on Marissa Build


The Dali
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We are making some nice progress but have a question...

 

We are seeing the limber holes in the framing but I didn't think this boat was set up for a bilge pump... and I don't see the holes connecting at the transom.  So it looks like the water could flow aft but stay in each of the separate sections of the framing for the hull.  We were planning on creating weep holes transversely so they all connected at the stern and eventually run into what would be the bilge area near the motor mount.  Does that sound right?

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Yes you do need the limber holes. You need to be able to drain any water that can get into the bilge area so that it can escape through the drain plug in the transom with the boat on the trailer. With ventilation you can lower the humidity throughout the bilge area ang extending the boats life.

 

Where can the water come from? It insidious, it will find it's way through poor or aging caulking, hatches, the drain plug or condensation etc. 

 

I like to store these boats on the trailer with the bow high enough to drain. The drain plug removed and cockpit or console hatches or any opening 

that can connect to the bilge area open.

 

Before the cockpit sole is glued down, I make sure that any small dams are cut away or epoxy filled so that all water will make its way to the drain plugs.

 

This is why I do not like pouring foam into the bilge.

 

On my Marissa I made the console access door with louvers so that the console and bilge can ventilate. This also helps get rid of the slight fuel vapor that permeates through the plastic fuel tank.

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I just checked the plans for the Marissa and it looks like we don't emphasize this in the plans but yes you should cut the corners essentially of the bottom stringers off so allow the compartments to drain inward toward the keel.

 

Here is a picture from the Marissa Construction album where you can see the transverse limber holes in the far aft
bottom corner of the bottom stringers.

 

I think you could argue that you don't need a bilge pump on the Marisa if you only go for day trips and don't leave the boat in the water. If you want a bilge pump then I think its just a matter of adding a small hatch to the sole under the motor well so you can drop in a bilge pump on a stick. Something like this (below) so you don't have to reach all the way down and you can remove it or inspect it easily.

 

image.thumb.png.e7bbfc16f25fd2d7fda88c0f0de9068c.png

 

 fetch?id=403864&d=1515688094

 

 

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On 1/26/2022 at 10:36 AM, Designer said:

"This is why I do not like pouring foam into the bilge."

I cut foam blocks to loosely fit between the stringers for flotation. That allows the water to flow past the foam. Only use them outboard and along with flotation higher up to stay within the USCG "upright and level" guidelines.

 

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26 minutes ago, Chick Ludwig said:

I cut foam blocks to loosely fit between the stringers for flotation. That allows the water to flow past the foam. Only use them outboard and along with flotation higher up to stay within the USCG "upright and level" guidelines.

 

Thanks Chuck, and that's the path we are going as well.

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A few years ago I was building fiberglass boats called the "Coastal Skiff". Kinda like the Carolina Skiff. Manufacturers are required by the USCG to have a sample of each model to be tested. i had used foam blocks all across under the floor. I figured that more flotation would be better. When tested, the flotation down the center tended to make the boat want to roll over in some conditions. The answer was to remove the foam in the center.

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