Jump to content

OB 26 custom hull build


Oyster

Recommended Posts


Thanks fellows. Well work has been proceeding along. Next week we plan on starting to plank the opposing sides. I did manage to purchase a pretty substantial u-bolt bow eye  and it came a set of two.  I will only be using one. So if anyone else finds a need for one with a long threaded shank, feel free to send a pm and you can have it.  This is the link to the specs.  The defender ones required a shipping cost of half the price of the  bow eye u bolt. And I don't see any problems with this one having it in hand. I will dry fit it and will have the holes in place when I finish the planking and glass work to clean up and install in place.

 

NovelBee 2 Pack of Stainless Steel Stern Bow Eye Tie Down U Bolt with Hex Nuts and washers,Stock Dia. 5/8",Thread Length 5-7/16",Overall Length 8"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Well not a lot to show in this stage, but I found the whisky plank. :<}  and  ready for the edges to be trimmed. I capped the stem ends with solid mahogany and will wrap a couple of tabs around the stem front before doing the chine tabs.  Silently in the middle of the night I can hear " Prepare to ram" hehe I plan to rough block the sides before I glass to eliminate a lot of the ever present dimples thats generated by screws and washers in the soft plywood faces . The bow eye plate will lay perfectly flat on the face of the solid wood. 

20230119_151843.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...

Well its been a while and  I have neglected posting any finish work shots, since the work is fairly boring in color. And pictures from phones are way to large and I don't know how to transfer them to here, which also are huge.  But i have reached the point that I think I am within a week of finally getting the final coat of topcoat in it. Life  has a way of altering the best laid plans. 

 

Fairing was not as easy as it used to be.  Its been a while since I used a gorilla board to sand and fair and had really forgot about how much fun it was and excersize I got when getting up close and personal with the real warmth that wood gives you.😉

 

.  But the summer was a bit humid and gummy on the surface, which slowed the process too. So anyway, upon finishing a bit more high build primer in areas and sanding, then topcoat, she will see sunshine and the inside will see sunlight too after the flip.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This might be heresy to some people, but I have had good results with Bondo. I was tired of the expense, cure time, and sanding effort required with epoxy fillers. I used Bondo on a motorboat hull 25 years ago and it’s worked fine. Multiple trips at 30 mph through waves on Lake Superior included. I’ve used it ever since.

 

Attached is a photo of a hull faired with Bondo.

 

IMG_0229.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reacher- you can’t argue with success.  Your boat looks beautiful. Bondo is fast compared to epoxy but it is also more brittle.  I had a house painter that wanted to use it for do some repair on siding.  Tried to talk him into using epoxy but he won the day and 2 years later the Bondo is popping off the siding.  I am not brave enough to use it on a boat.- Ken

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Ken, I am glad that the Bondo has not failed for Reacher.

I am quicker than most to try and save a buck but most of the time it bites me in the butt. 

 

I built my first stitch and glue Catspaw tender in the late Sixties. The only epoxy that we could buy at the time was as thick as molasses on a cold day.  I was aware that polyester resin not a true adhesive so I used isothalic polyester which was the best at the time. I cross hatched the surface under the glass tape with a piece of saw blade and primed under the  tape with thinned resin. She lasted a little more than a year of full time use before the glass tape started to delaminate.

 

I made a female mold from masonite and built a fiberglass Catspaw. She was heavier than the plywood version and the hull panels were not as stiff. She was well patched when retired at about 10 years old. The next dinghy was like the first but built with modern epoxy. She was the best of the three and was still going at 25 years when I loaned her to friend who lost her in a hurricane.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really hoping to see new photos. I'm waiting for the new plans to be available, was advised the modified plan with the bracket will be available near the end of Nov 2023. Kens photo thread is fantastic, as is this one. Really going to school on it. Can't wait to start the build. We plan to eventually try the Great Loop with it, out of Nova Scotia.

I've built a couple cedar kayaks and more recently two of Doug Hylans Point Comfort dead rise skiffs, an 18 foot and 23 footer which I still use. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

Wow… a lot more needed to be employed than when I asked a neighbor family on their evening walk to help me flip my two builds (Core Sound 15 and 15 foot ski boat.)  Simple grunting and some muscling did it just fine… a reason I enjoy the small boat approach. 😁

 

That is quite a project you are doing… it looks great. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, PadrePoint said:

Wow… a lot more needed to be employed than when I asked a neighbor family on their evening walk to help me flip my two builds (Core Sound 15 and 15 foot ski boat.)  Simple grunting and some muscling did it just fine… a reason I enjoy the small boat approach. 😁

 

That is quite a project you are doing… it looks great. 

Well you can create a wooden frame , known as a wooden wheel and rolled it over with the right combination of room and related equipment.  But we wanted to get it up on the trailer with simplicity and less time consuming.   Sometimes you cry "uncle" though  without crying uncle.  We weighed the value coupon against  manual labor and the added effort. For our situation the extra effort and materials to get the strongback mobile from the ground in the confined space and on the other side of the yard to the driveway may have been a bit of an overkill. But it was grand beyond wild imagination for the uneven humps and angles. But the setup was absolutely the ticket and two people pushed while one person steered. But the project is a slow and steady piece of work that will hopefully be completed in the next couple of years, if things goes as planned. How do you eat an elephant? one bite at a time. 

 

Now its time for Alan to point us in the right direction of locating the fuel tank and related parts to be incorporated under the deck for the desired interior layout that will be determined once we clean out the non essential parts. . 

 

By the way I highly recommend solid 8" casters in lieu of pneumatic ones on solid surfaces. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A beautiful design and build!  Flipping her over is a real turning point ( not really intending a pun).  Great for your neck, not having to twist and turn to see what she will look like in her intended orientation. Love seeing this build progressing.  A bit nostalgic for that focused time building Rosie....

Ken

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.