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Looking for Spindrift 11 build logs


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I have varnished over gussets made of epoxy and woodflour, that is gussets made of B&B's special blend.  It works very well.  The coaming you see here is such an animal.  I also used screws through pads to hold down the deck pieces while the epoxy dried, then removed the screws and filled the holes with thickened epoxy, which I sanded flat before recoating and then varnishing the whole thing.  That also works well.  As you can see, from a few feet away, the whole thing looks like there are no blemishes, and up close, if you take care, it all looks very nice.

CB coaming.jpeg

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Alan has put together an index of build logs off this forum.  Unfortunately, it’s buried on page 5.  I wish there was some way for it to be pinned up at the top of page one.  Try this link:  

  Also, if you enjoy watching videos, and don’t mind spending the money, there are many excellent boatbuilding videos on offcenterharbor.com.  Russel Brown’s series on mastering epoxy is wonderful.  He is meticulously neat with his epoxy.  His method differs a little from what most of us do (as in Alan’s videos).  But he is so methodical.  

The plans come with instructions that include a list of recommended tools.  A small block plane is all you need, not a power planer.  I wouldn’t be without my random orbital sander that attaches to my shop vac.  And your respirator should have cartridges for organic vapors.  All are available at lumber yards.  The biggest tool you need access to is a table saw.  They are used for cutting up gunwales and cleats, and making the cuts for scarf joints.

 

Where do you live?  Maybe one of us is nearby, and can look over your shoulder from time to time. 
 

Finally, B&B is the best place to buy your supplies and hardware from.  But they don’t carry paint and varnish.  Painted surfaces require much less attention than varnished. We’ll get to brand names later. 
 

Welcome to the forum!

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On 11/24/2021 at 11:29 AM, Don Silsbe said:

Alan has put together an index of build logs off this forum.  Unfortunately, it’s buried on page 5.  I wish there was some way for it to be pinned up at the top of page one.  Try this link:  

  Also, if you enjoy watching videos, and don’t mind spending the money, there are many excellent boatbuilding videos on offcenterharbor.com.  Russel Brown’s series on mastering epoxy is wonderful.  He is meticulously neat with his epoxy.  His method differs a little from what most of us do (as in Alan’s videos).  But he is so methodical.  

The plans come with instructions that include a list of recommended tools.  A small block plane is all you need, not a power planer.  I wouldn’t be without my random orbital sander that attaches to my shop vac.  And your respirator should have cartridges for organic vapors.  All are available at lumber yards.  The biggest tool you need access to is a table saw.  They are used for cutting up gunwales and cleats, and making the cuts for scarf joints.

 

Where do you live?  Maybe one of us is nearby, and can look over your shoulder from time to time. 
 

Finally, B&B is the best place to buy your supplies and hardware from.  But they don’t carry paint and varnish.  Painted surfaces require much less attention than varnished. We’ll get to brand names later. 
 

Welcome to the forum!

Thank you Don for that great info!

As far as tools go, I'll get some basic epoxy application tools, a block plane and basic table saw. I'm gonna keep it simple. I sold my table saw when we moved recently so I'll have to replace that. It was just a home-owner style 10" saw and I feel like something similar would be fine. No way on a power planer... I'd do so much damage with one of those! I'll also get an inexpensive router and good quality respirators for my build team. Thanks for the note on cartridges specifically for organic vapors.


I bookmarked the build library for future reference. That's gonna be a great resource. That's exactly what I was looking for when I started this post.

 

What a coincidence that you mention the epoxy videos at Off Center Harbor. I came across one of Russell Brown's videos last week while scouring youtube for Spindrift builds and epoxy advice. I was frustrated that only a couple of the videos from the series were posted there so I tracked down offcenterharbor.com and bought a membership. My "free" hat should be arriving soon. I ordered his book and that should be arriving tomorrow. I also like to watch the Boatworks Today channel on youtube. I've learned a lot from Andy there. And of course I've watched the Core Sound 15 Build. Allen has been super helpful so far with email answers to my several questions. There is also an 11N build video series by a channel called Essence of Sailing. He bumbles through it a little which is actually kind of helpful. Learning from somebody else's mistakes is better than making them myself.

 

I live in Hampton Va. At the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. We moved here this year for my oldest sons wish to pursue collage dinghy racing (his Olympic class coach lives here) and his studies for a career in marine biology.  I'm not a big fan of Hampton overall and am looking forward to moving up the Va. coast closer to Deltaville once the nest is empty.

 

P.S. Does anybody know what brand of epoxy that B&B sells? I doubt it's their own formulation.

I'm also considering West Systems and Total Boat.

 

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You can't go wrong with West, they wrote the book on epoxy, additives and procedures.  But it is expensive. I have tried some TotalBoat products and been satisfied.  Haven't tried the epoxy.  I bought B&B epoxy, wood flour/Cabosil mix, glass tape and pumps for my builds.  Much cheaper and I found no draw backs using it. Dunno who made it, don't really care, it wouldn't mean anything if I did know. If you order the amounts suggested in the plans, from B&B, at the time you order your kit,  you will get it in time and end up with a tad left over, unless you are a complete slob, and then probably still have enough to finish.

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There are a lot of boats on the water that have been built with B&B epoxy.  It works well, and is reasonably priced.  I’ve also used Raka epoxy, which is lower in price.  They make up for it in shipping cost, though.  
 

I have two routers.  My 1/2” router is cumbersome.  It stays on the router table.  Most of the time, I reach for this little 1/4” baby router. 75A47DA2-7F86-4AA0-BA48-DE0F5AD0B59D.thumb.png.40e7df716dc48d0fd829979daa38c667.png Alan put me onto it, when he used it on that Core Sound 15 build video.  It’s all you need.  And you don’t need a fancy table saw. A friend of mine nut a Spindrift 12 using a little 8” table saw.

 

And be sure to watch Eric Blake’s video on epoxy on the Offcenter Harbor website.  And Bill Thomas’ series on building the Fox canoe also has great techniques in it.  Russel Brown’s technique using Peel Ply is worth considering in areas that you may varnish. I used that technique in my last build, a CLC Annapolis Wherry.  https://youtube.com/shorts/-zDRrK8SfZo?feature=share

Otherwise, I’s stick with glass tape and a good random orbital sander.


Don’t sweat the small stuff.  Ask us questions.  It’ll turn out great.  Your biggest problem with this build will be sorting through our assorted recommendations, and choosing the one that’s right for you.  Enjoy the process!
 

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A couple VERY nice tools to have: pull saw (Irwin) and Shinto rasp. (I taped the end to make it friendlier to apply pressure with my other hand’s finger tips.). (The B&B card happened to be right there on the bench 🙂)

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I liked having two cordless drills (three actually)… one is enough. I also bought an inexpensive router (and bits) from Harbor Freight. That might be adequate unless a quality tool is wanted.  (Actually, I guess my flush cut bits are from Amazon and a set of 4 round-over bits are from Harbor Freight.)
 

I think that B&B tries hard to keep materials costs as reasonable as possible and I appreciate the effort. 
 

For the solid wood pieces (stringers and such), you might consider asking B&B to supply parts you’d normally have to rip with a table saw. They use clear and clean southern yellow pine.  I suppose a drawback is limiting everything to 8 foot for the shipping box. I picked up my kits at the shop and didn’t need to spend anything for shipping. Plus, they secured 16 foot solid wood parts that were cut to dimension and full width boards onto the top of my vehicle.  

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5 hours ago, Hirilonde said:

I bought B&B epoxy, wood flour/Cabosil mix, glass tape and pumps for my builds.  Much cheaper and I found no draw backs using it. Dunno who made it, don't really care, it wouldn't mean anything if I did know.

 

4 hours ago, Don Silsbe said:

There are a lot of boats on the water that have been built with B&B epoxy.  It works well, and is reasonably priced. 
 

Okay then, I won't care either. Cost is a factor but so isn't quality. I was reading up more on their epoxy and it seems they buy it in bulk and use it themselves. That's good enough for me.

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5 hours ago, Don Silsbe said:

I have two routers.  My 1/2” router is cumbersome.  It stays on the router table.  Most of the time, I reach for this little 1/4” baby router. Alan put me onto it, when he used it on that Core Sound 15 build video.  It’s all you need.  And you don’t need a fancy table saw. A friend of mine nut a Spindrift 12 using a little 8” table saw.

 That's the one I'll get then. It'll only ever be used for home-owner craft type projects anyway. That and a home-owner quality table saw.

5 hours ago, Don Silsbe said:

And be sure to watch Eric Blake’s video on epoxy on the Offcenter Harbor website.  And Bill Thomas’ series on building the Fox canoe also has great techniques in it.  Russel Brown’s technique using Peel Ply is worth considering in areas that you may varnish. I used that technique in my last build, a CLC Annapolis Wherry.  https://youtube.com/shorts/-zDRrK8SfZo?feature=share

Otherwise, I’s stick with glass tape and a good random orbital sander.

I picked up an extra long HDMI cable so I can watch the Off Center Harbor videos on TV. And my Epoxy Basics book arrived today.


Oh yeah, I'll also need a good disc sander with vacuum attachment.

So just glass tape and no matting? I've seen builds done both ways.

5 hours ago, Don Silsbe said:

Don’t sweat the small stuff.  Ask us questions.  It’ll turn out great.  Your biggest problem with this build will be sorting through our assorted recommendations, and choosing the one that’s right for you.  Enjoy the process!

Thank you. I'm gonna be looking for all of the tips and advice that will be offered. I just hope people  won't get upset if I decide not to employ every bit of advice I get. I'll throw it all in the hopper and will have to decide what is gonna work for my particular situation. I'll readily admit when I realize ignored advice that should have been taken. If nothing else, for the sake of future builders.
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I liked the b&b epoxy and definitely like the "special blend" thickener.   I thought the hardner turned solid a little quicker than others (for example no problem with system 3 hardner) so be sure to keep it warm over periods when you're not using it.  I noted the same problem with Total Boat.  If you have to store it for a few months, be sure to take the pumps out and dry them or they will clog up irreparably.

I used west in the past, but the liquids turned color with time and seemed brittle to me when dry.  But the west publications on line are free and helpful.  The b&b epoxy, in contrast to west, seem "friendly" when solid.

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3 hours ago, PadrePoint said:

A couple VERY nice tools to have: pull saw (Irwin) and Shinto rasp.

 

I also bought an inexpensive router (and bits) from Harbor Freight. That might be adequate unless a quality tool is wanted.  (Actually, I guess my flush cut bits are from Amazon and a set of 4 round-over bits are from Harbor Freight.)

Yes, Japanese pull saw... that's another thing I'll add to my list. Every build I've watched used one and it seemed to help with the work.

 

It will help to know what router bits and sizes I should have on hand. I've never used a router so don't have experience with this. I'll certainly be practicing on scrap wood first.

 

3 hours ago, PadrePoint said:

For the solid wood pieces (stringers and such), you might consider asking B&B to supply parts you’d normally have to rip with a table saw. They use clear and clean southern yellow pine.  I suppose a drawback is limiting everything to 8 foot for the shipping box. I picked up my kits at the shop and didn’t need to spend anything for shipping. Plus, they secured 16 foot solid wood parts that were cut to dimension and full width boards onto the top of my vehicle.  

So they did this for you?! Man, that would be awesome if they would do this for me. I'll send an email to see if they'll be kind enough to charge me for this service. I'm picking up my order too and will be bringing a 6x10 utility trailer.

Though I was considering upgrading the wood I used for the gunnels to something a little nicer.

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Find some weighty items (bricks, blocks, etc.) for gluing finger joints of the side and bottom pieces… and for gluing on the seats.  It doesn’t need to be excessive.  Or, your boys could sit on them for 8 hours or so. 😁
 

Heavy plastic is helpful for a few things.  I bought a roll of plastic window covering.  Epoxy will get into the floor.  I usually hit cured bumps of epoxy with a hammer hard enough to shatter the epoxy but NOT damage the floor… or cover the floor with a tarp. 
 

I used wide “popsicle” (craft) sticks for stirring epoxy. Plastic yogurt containers hold a couple pumps of epoxy.  Sour cream containers are bigger for larger jobs. Some kinds of plastic work a little better than others.  An advantage of using these kinds of things is that they are recyclables that can be discarded. 
 

2” chip brushes from Harbor Freight work well for brushing epoxy into fiberglass tape. They’re cheap, but can be cleaned for a couple/few additional usages. 
 

I bought from Lowes 1 inch wide paint stirrers for quart sized paint cans (they are shaped like big popsicle sticks). I almost exclusively used them for making fillets… the ends are nicely rounded. B&B has a pack of fillet “”paddles”… a pack of three with six sizes of rounded ends.  Be sure to clean them each time they’re used for reuse. 
 

I use acetone to clean up epoxy.  I found paint thinner cleans paint better than acetone.  White vinegar cleans epoxy from hands as does “Fast Orange” soap (I found it on Amazon… or car parts store. 
 

A shop vac is helpful but, again not crucial. 
 

I bought the DeWalt sander and it works VERY well. The Weezer’s parents gave her this sander as a present… only cordless.  I was impressed enough (and have several extra batteries for my DeWalt drill) that I gave my sander to my son for his canoe build and bought a cordless for myself. 😁

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I have a shop vac and a hose that I can tape onto the sander’s bag outlet… it really helped with dust… but the little bag also did OK. 

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I've used B&B for years and love it! Usually I keep it warm during the winter by having it in a foam box I made, with a light bulb on it. If I'm not using it for a long time, I'll turn the light off. I always leave the pumps in. After the winter months, the resin will form crystals and won't pump. I just set the jug with the pump in it, in a pot of water (An OLD pot---not my wife's good one!!!) and set in on a burner on the stove set on low heat for a couple of hours. The resin magically turns back to liquid---including what is in the pump.

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On 11/29/2021 at 6:58 AM, Chick Ludwig said:

The resin magically turns back to liquid---including what is in the pump.

I can't say I want to challenge Chick on anything, but then again it's warmer in NC than in Wis.  I used the hot water method to uncrystallize the stuff, and it was fine, but, man, those pumps just wouldn't clean out.  That little ball bearing in there stayed mired in goo, no matter what I tried.  Had to get new pumps.

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