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Request for Advice, Coastal Camp Cruising


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MANY years ago I considered an open boat with tent arrangement, or a removable cuddy. After all the considerations you are discussing, I'm sure glad all my cruisers would have cabins. Time to BUILD a

I don't care for the heat of June, July, August. Plus there are fewer bugs and fewer people in the off season, but those are personal preferences.   October and November are good. Water temp

Happy New Year Don,  it seems you’ve done your due diligence thinking through the tent selection and I now better understand the challenges. Choosing a side entry is a good choice with the tents

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I think my current approach is to make the floorboards and buy a one-man tent to place on the platform.  The one in the photo is cheaper than the bivy.  If I feel ambitious, later, I’ll make a dodger.  Not for sailing, but to deflect wind and rain while at anchor.  We’ll see about that.   Comments? 

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Sorry thumb slip. I’ve done a good bit of backpacking and camping using tents and hammocks. I don’t have experience using tents on boats yet but I’m inclined to try something different, especially if the cabin gets too hot to sleep in. One concern I thought about is having a side entry for ingress/egress. It could possibly be problematic having limited deck space and beam width. Maybe an tent opening facing the bow or stern would be easier entry. Any rate sounds like a fun option to explore. Stay safe and have a joyous New Year!

 

todd

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On 12/29/2020 at 4:20 PM, Designer said:

Peter, if you think that my tent setup had too much windage, have a look at this.

 

They had a pair of Hobie tri's and always cruised together. They each carried their own condo while sailing but set them both up on the one boat, port and starboard to keep it balanced.

 

We did the Outer Banks 120 the summer before last. They said that the windage had not bothered them. We had thunder storms with squalls on two consecutive nights with the second putting us on a lee shore. I did see them walk the boat into deeper water when the storm woke me up but I think that it was more a poor choice of anchor setup.

Hobie tent sabin.jpg

That is a lot of windage. I’m not surprised they may have had anchor issues. The risk of dragging is much higher and you need a bigger anchor and more chain which is heavier and more awkward to handle. 
I think keeping a low profile has advantages.

Cheers

Peter HK

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@Todd Stein— at 15’ LOA, I’m length-challenged. The bivy requires end entry, which seems awkward.  Here’s my scientific analysis of the two.  Arrows indicate direction of egress.  Sorry, I don’t got no stinking CAD program!


256BE666-6733-4643-B79F-20AE34646855.thumb.jpeg.a378d317ac4829898fb2e9f4c3a6aa48.jpegThe tent requires moving the mizzen to the reefed position.  But there is just enough room to exit without falling overboard.


BD46BF42-00D3-4865-9B5A-684920462284.thumb.jpeg.87d0d7e5ff5b24ec92bd6fce8144a831.jpegThe bivy definitely has a smaller footprint.  And I don’t need to move the mizzen.  But it seems rather claustrophobic.  I watched the video of the OBX130.  If I get stuck in some weather with only a bivy for shelter, I might go a little nuts in there.  Plus, one reviewer stated that it does not breathe— condensation covered the entire inside.  And, it costs $10 more than the tent!

 

Keep the comments coming!

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On 12/30/2020 at 11:49 AM, Thrillsbe said:

I think my current approach is to make the floorboards and buy a one-man tent to place on the platform.  The one in the photo is cheaper than the bivy.  If I feel ambitious, later, I’ll make a dodger.  Not for sailing, but to deflect wind and rain while at anchor.  We’ll see about that.   Comments? 

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Unless you are going to cruise semi-often or more, that is a great plan IMO. And if you want to cruise regularly, build a Mach 3.

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@Hirilonde— I agree that the mk3 is the ultimate.  But since salt water is 4 hours away at best, and Core Sound is 7 or more, I need to be realistic.  Add to this that at least two months of our summer is devoted to travel, I realize I need to keep a tight rein on how I allocate funds.

 

This year will start with land-based camping in the Bulls Bay area north of Charleston.  I’ll try the live-aboard rig sometime this year, either there or on Hartwell Lake.  This fall, I’ll try out the Pamlico River.  Depending on weather, maybe I even camp at Sea Level, and do a little Core Sounding when I shoot down there for the Messabout.  

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I get it about the allocation of funds.  There is also the allocation of space. I have just brought my Spindrift 9N home so that I can have a boat for rowing on the drainage puddle across the street for excercise. (puddle = man made lake for dealing with rain run off).  It is half a mile across, so plenty for this. I now have a Lapwing, 
Spindrift and 2 Kudzu kayaks in my 2 car shop along with my tools and such. It's all a matter of priorities.

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I have a dodger on the CS 17, and really like it.  It's quick to set up - 15 seconds - and really cozy under there.  I've converted it to a tent for sleeping while camping by adding a tarp, but by itself it provides a lot of shelter and comfort.  Now, did I make it?  Um, not quite.  I ordered a kit from Sailrite, but realized after I got the kit that I'd never get our sewing machine through all those layers.  Plus, it seemed really complicated.  I ended up making the aluminum bows the way I wanted them with the parts from Sailrite, made an angle gauge to show how they should line up and then took the sunbrella and everything else to a canvas shop.  The shop did an absolutely wonderful job, far better than I could have imagined let alone executed.  I can sail with it up.

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Paul, I really like the way you’ve outfitted your boat, and especially admire how you use it.

 

Thrillsbe, you might consider a screen “bug bivy” along with a tarp to keep the rain and the sun off. Make a board for one side of the cockpit and no need to move the mizzen mast. I camped under a tarp on my CS 20 and liked how it worked. 

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@Reacher— I’ve thought about that bug bivy earlier on.  I haven’t ruled anything out yet.  Currently, I have an Annapolis Wherry to build.  But I’m thinking ahead to next year.

 

@Paul356– I was thinking about a simple version of a dodger, especially If I go with an end-entry tent, like the one in the photo.

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@Todd Stein— I’m still thinking about that end entry concept.  Just concerned about close quarters.

 

This video is driving my decision process.  I guess you need to watch it on Facebook.

https://www.facebook.com/spayment/videos/10218970634992397/

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I’ve done only one trip to that area that you speak of near Charleston but I’d like to go back. We sailed from McClellandville and set up up a base camp on Murphy Island which you are allowed to land camp on. From there we explored the fun grid of marsh islands. 
 

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@mattp— Thanks for the tip!  My chart shows Murphy Island as mostly marsh.  Are you talking the corner that’s next to Alligator Creek?  What time of year did you go?

@Todd Stein— The more I ponder the side vs. end entry, I favor the side.  The sleeping surface in my boat is higher forward, forcing the door to be bow-to, and facing into the wind.  In a squall, I’d drench my sleeping bag, if I needed to exit the tent for some reason.  For sure, I’ll need to test my side egress stability, before I sink money into an on-board tent system.  Most of this year will be various types of land camping, anyway.

@Paul356– I‘ve tried mummy sleeping bags, and find them too restrictive.  I think bivys are off my list.

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We camped on the beach just across from the northern tip of Cape Island.  It was a good spot. We maybe saw two other boats the whole weekend we were there.

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Happy New Year Don,

 it seems you’ve done your due diligence thinking through the tent selection and I now better understand the challenges. Choosing a side entry is a good choice with the tents you’ve selected and I’d like to offer up another two suggestions. First, Since we’re working with such limited space,  foremost in my mind would be selecting a tent which is easy to set up and even free standing. Second concern, and again this is my preference, is maximum ventilation. like the idea of lots of mesh but that can be a double edge sword. I’ve experienced my fair share of  early morning “Chinese Firedrills” scrambling to set up the rain fly. That has a large suck factor proportionate to preceding comfort level. Value in a significant other and things can go from bad to worse. Sleep in the buff gains you more  points and opportunities to make new friends!

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@Todd Stein— I was leaning toward more mesh, so I appreciate you sharing your wet setup experience.  I shudder what sort of “friends” I would attract in the marshes of the Carolinas.  Here’s my latest tent choice, although there are many other things to buy first.

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