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Spindrift 10, #1329 -- "Seabiscuit" . .


Pete McCrary
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Since July 5 I’ve had several sailing sessions and the laced luff works just fine.  I now consider Seabiscuit safe for solo sailing.  That is, when on the water the sail may be easily and quickly doused (or raised) without moving forward.  Also, it may be furled and kept out-of-the-way (using topping lift and sheet) for rowing.  That’s important in case of sudden turn of the weather.  It’s also useful for rowing away from a dock or launching ramp.

 

HOWEVER, I’ve decided that I’m just not up to sailing such a small dinghy.  For my age (88 yrs), its just too tippy and very hard on my knees — mainly because of the low height of the seats.  Also, my reduced agility makes moving across the boat when tacking very problematic.  Entry and exit was also very unstable.

 

So, she’s FOR SALE.  Here is the sign I’ve put on her:

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I certainly enjoyed building her AND i really hate to sell her.  So, I’ve learned a lesson at not-so-great an expense (call it “tuition”):  Old guys shouldn’t think they can sail a dinghy like in their youth!

 

Another reason for selling is that I’ve found and bought a small sailing cruiser — a 1993 Peep Hen in very good condition.  And before buying her, the owner allowed me to demonstrate [for myself] that I could easily raise and lower the mast, and move around the cabin and cockpit with ease and find the seats and bunks comfortable.  She will be named “Recall,” which is a [military] bugle call that announces “… the end of drill and all hard work.”

 

Here are a few pixs:

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Pete McCrary

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I am only 68, but I am beginning to appreciate your decision Pete.  I am getting close to making aluminum or wood/carbon masts as my birdsmouth  Douglas Fir masts are getting harder to step. Short sails in my Spindrif 9N on the small pond in front of my house are amusing, but I would not want a Spindrift as my only boat. Best to you on your new boat.

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Pete, congratulations on the Peep hen. That rig is very easy to handle and is why so many of my friends up in years sail boats with similar rigs. I just got back from sailing my 11N in the 1000 Islands while on vacation. It's performance is fantastic, and probably why I picked it, but handy it isn't. I sailed out into Eel bay and the wind stiffened. I found reefing on the water was very difficult. I've been thinking about seeing if one of the rigs from the Catspaw rig might be more appropriate from my use.

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Hay, guys.  Go for my 10 foot Seabiscuit.  All spars, including the 3-piece, tapered mast, oars, rudder, and CB all fit in the boat for road transport or towing on the water.  Hull (alone) just weighs 100 lbs.  And with the modified laced luff, reefing is very easy.  So also is raising/ lowering the sail and furling it.  Mast, boom, sail & lines all fit in a zippered Sunbrella cover.

 

For forum members I’d offer a nice discount.

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Steve,

 

I do not know why you find reefing on the water difficult? I find it very easy and quick to reef on the water and that I have a very efficient sail when reefed. I can only think that you do not have it set up correctly.

 

The most important component in the system is the block on the luff. It must be a ball bearing block and have almost no friction under load. The reason is that with the 2:1 purchase in the system, means that twice as much line has to run through that block than runs through the clew cringle. If there is any friction in that block, the clew will not draw down to the boom.

 

To reef, I ease the main sheet, lower the sail to the mark on the halyard, pull on the reefing line until the reefing clew comes to the boom, pull in the mainsheet to suit my course and sail away. 

 

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Thank you Graham.  I'm hoping to make the trip.  October's a busy month with the MASCF in 

Saint Michaels and a 65th VMI reunion right after that.  Probably skip the Mid-Atlantic and make it to Bayboro.  We'll see.  Presently waiting out this hot spell, then get used to the Peep Hen (named "Recall" after the army bugle call.

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