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Update of hull 24 build


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  • 2 weeks later...

My varnish problem

ok this is my question what am I doing wrong, I am applying varnish to the bulkheads and stringers in the cabin of my cs mk111, the wood has had two coats of epoxy and  sanded with 220 grit to get it smooth with no shiny spots, wiped down the work with alcohol the varnish that I’m using is total boat  lust The first two coats of varnish were thinned 25% with mineral spirits then I applied four additional coats at full strength varnish letting it dry about an hour and a half between coats at first I was using a Chyna bristle natural brush and then switched to a foam brush the problem I’m having is since this work is vertical surfaces I cannot apply enough varnish to let it flow out without drips or runs and the result is full of brush marks and frankly looks like cottage cheese so what am I doing wrong I really would like to know I have watched have a dozen videos on how to varnish but they all seem to work on flat surfaces where they can put enough varnish on to let it flow out

looking forward to hear your comments and solve my problem 

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The only time I thin varnish is when I do the first coat, and it is on bare wood. This is to get the first coat to penetrate the wood a little better.  And then I only thin 10-15%. Over epoxy I do not thin at all.  And when I do thin I use pure gum turpentine. Even in Florida I wait over night to sand a coat.

 

I find on vertical surfaces I have to work the varnish to a complete but thin coat and then slowly feather out the finish. There is a knack to this that I can't really describe.  And even then, I always find a drool or two.

 

On a side note: a varnish brush can be stored in turpentine for many months. The solids won't come out of solution like they do when the brush is left in mineral spirits.

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I thin most of my varnish with Epifanes Easy Flow.  It is a retardant (mostly naphtha) that allows the varnish time to level out.  I apply it with a 4” white foam roller, and sometimes tip it off with an actual brush.

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I used Japan drier, a mysterious product I won't pretend to understand.  I also waited a day or two to allow full drying of the varnish and hand sanded between coats to even out my runs and high spots.  It was my first effort at varnishing a vertical surface.  Felt like I was sanding off a good portion of my work but it got better as I went.   Keep after it. 

 

   

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You will note Mark, that the guy from North Carolina (warm) likes to slow down the solvent flash off to let it level, and the guy from Washington (cold) likes to add something to speed up the flash off and drying.  Both are sound practices for the conditions and used for many years.

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Ok after due consideration I went ahead and made trim rings to go under the port lights each light will have a trim ring inside and out which will be finished as bright work, also the interior of the cabin will be trimmed with heavy duty vinyl instead of paint since I hate painting 0

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I love using the foam roller for varnish, at least for larger, flat areas.  It helps to evenly distribute the product.  Especially if I’ve added the retardant (Easy Flow), I usually don’t need to brush it much, if at all.

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  • 5 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Hi, Mark.  Your boat looks wonderful. I enjoyed reading about the build.  I think what I need to do now is find a completed boat, preferably both a CS17 MK3 and a CS20 Mk3 that I can go out in. I have never sailed any Core Sound boat, but I really like the looks of them and the cat ketch design.  

 

We have a lot of fun in our Scamp, but for multiday trips, it really is too small, especially with the dog.    I know the CS17 isn't very big, but I think it will feel palatial compared to the 12 foot Scamp.

Samantha

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nice to here from you its a lot of work to build a cs  boat they do a very good job in their design and production and their hardware package is second to none. I haven’t sailed a cs boat, or any other for many years it will be a great learning curve once it’s done, there are many options to take into consideration I chose to raise the seat tops in the cabin which gives you a little deeper locker but my wife and I are well under 6feet tall so it didn’t affect us. Well just have to see how it goes. If you have any particular questions please don’t hesitate to call or write the forum were all here to help any way we can. I don’t know of many boats here in this part of the country most seem to be on the east coast or off shore 

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I wish someone would compile a bunch of cat ketch sailing tips for sailors new to the rig.  I learned a lot of tricks by attending the Messabouts.  But that would be difficult for y’all out there on the west coast and overseas.  A book would be nice, but who uses books anymore?  Maybe a YouTube video series.

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On 9/20/2021 at 9:52 AM, Thrillsbe said:

I wish someone would compile a bunch of cat ketch sailing tips for sailors new to the rig.

Permanent archives have been discussed here and in other forums.  They are almost always dismissed.  Not just because some one has to do it, but learning things by reading, before you have even tried, is not sought by many people. Trying and asking specific questions is the choice of most, and a living/ongoing forum does that well. People can respond to exactly what the learner is asking, which can be much more meaningful.  Anyway, that is my 2¢

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This probably deserves its own thread, but things that are obvious to those of us with lots of experience are not always obvious to new folks or even those not familiar with a new

different rig. I still, after 2 years find things out that should seem obvious on skeena. 

 

I helped someone sail a boat he built for the first time and he had no idea he should mark the halyards for reefing. I myself found the obvious step of loosening the snotter before easing of to a run a new thing to me. I just showed a friend that has a boat with a mizzen the joy of sheeting it in hard, pulling up the rudder and centerboard with released sheets how even in the gnarliest conditions he could make a sandwich. All would have been easier to learn with a video or manual.

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  • 2 months later...

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