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Paint choices for my Two-paw


Crazer
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I asked this question in my build thread but didn't get much of a response so I thought I'd create a separate topic. I'm trying to make a decision about the type of finish to use on my Two-paw and am having trouble with the different options. It looks like it comes down to basically either one part or two part finishes. I see some pros and cons for both. I'd like to use a one part paint for all the obvious reasons-it's cheaper, easier to apply, etc. On the other hand, two part finishes are harder and more durable and this boat will be a working tender for my Cape Dory so I expect it to get knocked around. On the other hand, it might be easier to fix (and accept) the inevitable bumps and scrapes with a one part paint-less prep and complication. I think my default would be Interlux Brightsides but I don't have any first hand experience with it. I can easily overthink myself in circles with this kind of thing, so I'd really like to hear from some of you, what you chose and how it's worked out for you so far.

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You can't beat a sprayed, solvent based, 2 part, LPU. My Spindrift 9N tender is 14 years old and still not touched on the out side. The interior is a one part polyurethane and requires a spruce up every few years. Nearing the end of my build, my old boss told me to drop my dinghy off in the paint bay with the spars being sprayed and it would come out white. If I had to do it all myself, it would have been one part all over.

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I also vote for the two-part, solvent-based poly.  I used Britesides on Two Bits, and wish I’d used Perfection or Epifanes two-part.  I use my boat for boating while trailer camping.  In the photo below, you can see the effects of driving 840 miles before her first launch.  The interior is gray, and rubbed all over the navy blue exterior.  There were also navy blue marks all over the interior.  I think the two-part would have held up better.

9AEC46DC-484A-4E98-A7ED-16F0DF102DF9.jpeg

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Furthermore, on my Bay River Skiff, Local Honey,   I chose to paint the interior with Britesides (one-part) and the exterior with Epifanes 2-part poly.  Reason?  I’m basically a “Britesides Boy”, or so I thought.  But I thought the exterior would fare better with the two-part, what with trailer abuse and all.  This year, I repainted the interior.  The exterior is fine.  I can see a few places on the exterior, where I took a glancing blow (!), but the paint held.  Sure, up at the stem, there are some chips from direct hits.  (I wonder who did THAT???). But elsewhere, it is solid.  The interior did not fare as well.  There was a lot of abrasion, scratches and a few chips.  I think I’m now in favor of two-part poly across the board.

E67DBB55-48BA-476F-B528-59E99915DCFF.jpeg

E9C75BE2-F64D-457F-8FD5-6D46603E119D.jpeg

638DA58D-906B-4AD4-8240-14F015E99AF5.jpeg

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I agree with Don.

 

Two part is very durable.  I scraped my bow across a concrete bulkhead once, and it left a huge mark.  To my astonishment, when I washed the boat, the mark washed away and the paint was fine.

 

There is a price for the durability however, you have to ratio it out and mix it, add the thinner, and throw away what you don't use. If you don't mix up enough, you have to stop painting and mix more.  The fumes are very bad, a respirator is essential if you are painting indoors (and maybe outdoors?).

 

I think it is still worth it.

 

Definitely practice on some scrap to get a feel for how fast it dries.  I never was very precise with much thinner I added, I just splashed in a little more if it was hot, and it worked out fine.

 

Once I accidently used alcohol instead of the Awlgrip thinner (the containers looked similar), and even that worked out.

 

In a weird way, I actually started enjoying donning the respirator,  mixing, thinning, and rolling.

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I'm not an experienced boat builder, but I have to echo what Amos, Don and Dave said.  I used Interlux Britesides on a small sailing/rowing skif...it looked fabulous, but scratched easily.  In all fairness, I launch mostly from gravely beaches and trailer several miles of gravel road just to get to the highway from my house, but we live where we live.  

 

B and B recommends using a two part paint on the OB20 I'm building, so I did...Interlux Perfection.   At least on the hull exterior.  I may go with Briteside on the interior of the cabin and cockpit to save a few bucks on the areas that don't take such a beating.  I'm hoping for much better durability from the Perfection.   

 

If you want advice from a novice, the two part paint should not be intimidating.   I'm a "read the directions and follow them" kind of guy, but the two part Perfection was not difficult and turned out really nice.   I'm very optimistic about the two part Perfection.

 

Good luck with it and keep up the Nice work. 

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Alright, I figured I’d throw my hat in the ring for what it’s worth. Over the years of repairing and maintaining boats I’ve painted with all the top brands and have had For the most part been  pleased with the results. After making more than my share of mistakes, I make it my priority to carefully read the Appropriate section of the products MSDS. Turns out some paints aren’t compatible with certain chemicals, duhh. 
Although I prefer the durability of 2 part LPU’s, I do not like dealing with the noxious fumes In the garage at home. If I were building in a dedicated and separate shop I would more than likely use a 2 part paint. Pettit paints has been my preference, however I read where folks have used Rustoluem and/or Sherwin Williams products with success. I’ve met a good share of old timers who prefer to use exterior latex on their boats.

Who knows, maybe I might be lucky enough to get to that point!

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7 hours ago, Alan Stewart said:

You can also buy devoe devthane 379 in many colors now. A cheap alternative to awlgrip. Painted pretty much all of my boats with it so far and they look like the day I did it (minus the dings)

 

https://www.devoesuperstore.com/devoe-urethane-2/

 

Wow! They exploded their color line.  Looks like you can get a gallon for the price of a quart of Perfection or Epifanes.

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