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Repainting advice


acreew
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Hello all,

helped a friend build this skiff. He covered in 12 oz cloth with no attempts at smoothing/fairing. Now he is considering redoing. How would you recommend doing this? E.g., would we need to re glass after smoothing/fairing...

 

thank you for any thoughts.

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I had a similar situation with someone painting the interior of a fiberglass boat. While it was no fun, I used CitriStrip stripper I bought at Lowes and a scrub brush to remove the paint. It softened the paint and didn't touch the fiberglass. I'd give it a try and make sure it doesn't hurt the epoxy, but I'm guessing it will work..

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Not to pick on your friend, but when he did the glass and resin he was a slob.  If he used epoxy he has so much sanding to do there might not be any paint left by the time it is fair.  If he used polyester I wouldn't even bother, build a new boat.  I know I sound cruel, but I couldn't live with such a mess. But then this is what I would do and he has to make his own decision.

 

edit: Another option is to call it a work boat and leave it be. Keep it as such, sell it as such and build a new boat. Both are options.

Edited by Hirilonde
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I’d say no reglassing is necessary. 12 oz cloth is plenty thick. I’d use 80 grit on a random orbit sander to grind down the high spots. Or the wood rasp if that works. Then fill the low spots with bondo. Then sand it smooth, prime and paint. Others might recommend an epoxy based filler for the low spots, but bondo will do just fine in this application. A couple/few hours of sanding will make a huge difference.

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On 2/25/2020 at 6:15 PM, Hirilonde said:

Not to pick on your friend, but when he did the glass and resin he was a slob.  If he used epoxy he has so much sanding to do there might not be any paint left by the time it is fair.  If he used polyester I wouldn't even bother, build a new boat.  I know I sound cruel, but I couldn't live with such a mess. But then this is what I would do and he has to make his own decision.

 

edit: Another option is to call it a work boat and leave it be. Keep it as such, sell it as such and build a new boat. Both are options.

 

I don't consider your advice as picking on the builder.  Posts like this are far too frequent and good repair advice may not be what the builder needs.  After all, the situation was apparent all along the way by the guy who did it.  How do you expect the guy who allowed this to happen to follow good advice in rectifying it??.  The proper way to deal with any resin situation is to make it right at each step and not leave globs to be cleaned up at the end.  Like any of us, I am also guilty of not doing clean up along the way as well as I should and curse myself for having to work harder at the end.  Never anything an order of magnitude this bad though.  If the surface below the resin is anything as bad as is shown, it calls for a big effort to make it right.  Otherwise, just ignore it and use the boat as is.  If it's waterproof, it will still be a boat and the fish don't care.

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