Jump to content

"LAPPER" ~ "GENOA" ????


Guest Graeme"SNUPI bui
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest T. Nelson Surbrook

Graeme, When the sail in under load it is very hard to roll it up. If you slack off on the jib sheet while under load it can be rolled up with no problem. They are pretty simple and are easy to use as well.

tnelson@surbrook.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Guest Graeme"SNUPI bui

Hi there, Nelson,

I guess I didn't make my thoughts too clear..... What I meant by "Under load", was under loaded conditions, whereby you'd put the vessel "In Irons" or at least unload the headsail, then roll up a portion of the "jib", then continue on with a reduced headsail.

BTW ... I can't tell from the pic's of your furler, that I've seen, but I'm presuming that you have a PVC "roller tube" attached to your furler drum and rotating around the forestay.

- - What is the tube's bearing setup over the forestay cable?

- - How did you attach your headsail to this rotating tube ?

- - What size & what type of "tube or pipe" did you use ?

I bought a Ronstan furling drum & forestay top swivel, and must come up with a rotating S.steel or anodized aluminum connecting "tube" and bearings. .... and a method of attaching the foresail.

I have access to a varied selection of extruded aluminum tubes, via a friend who builds fire dept rescue , pumper and utility units.

I intend to end up with a "reefing" furler.

Graeme ... Nova Scotia

graeme.realtor@ns.sympatico.ca

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest capt jake

and must come up with a rotating S.steel or anodized aluminum connecting "tube" and bearings

The prototype that we are working on is solid nylon round stock. Very tough, durable and is able to be tapped (threaded) for fasteners.

The whole spool is basically made up of nylon and SS screws (at this point).

BTW this isn't how Tom's is set up.

jwentz4@attbi.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Graeme"SNUPI bui

Hello there Capt,

So do I gather from that "Solid" nylon tube, that you are running a separate system behind the forestay ?

Graeme

graeme.realtor@ns.sympatico.ca

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest capt jake

That part I am still working out with Paul. The drum is nylon and the 'bearings' are double acting SS swivels (presently). I am loking into sealed bearings also. It will be a while before Paul and I can get together to go over this a little more. It is impossible to communicate these thoughts via e-mail, and only slightly easier via phone. Be patient.

jwentz4@attbi.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Paul J [Aberdeen Wa]

Don't you ever call me "Teacher" please, pretty please. I am just trying to help here and aid in a design that will work for most people. But calling me "Teacher" is just a bit over the edge for me. ;)

Oh and I did get your email and the drawing. There is just one small problem. Now I need all the sail plan drawings in detail and just how you are thinking of making this work. It's your design and I can only work on it if I have all the info. :D

But it can be done blending a hardsail and a soft sail. But I need info. :)

Paul J

paul@ultasail.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest T. Nelson Surbrook

Graeme, For the tube I used 3/4"sch.40 pvc pipe. Using the table saw I made a laterial cut so I could slide the sail into the slot made with the saw. The luff has a line sewen into the edge that goes in the slot of the pvc pipe. For the bearing on the top I just used a pipe cap with a hole drilled in it for the forstay to go through. The bottom bearing is a hole in the drum like the one in the top. The setup is very crude and not fancy at all. Here's the thing, it works and it works well. You can make as fancy and fine a setup as you want and it will work too. I just wanted to see how it would work and to go sailing. Maybe someday I will use a "proper" one but for now this is working just fine and like most things "if it aint broken I won't fix it. My advice would be to not over-engineer this piece of gear. I think on boats, simple is better. Hope this helps.

tnelson@surbrook.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Ray Frechette jr

I am quite interested in your setup Nelson,

Are you able to reef the headsail with it and sail witht the jib partially furled in in heavy winds? What prevents the jib from unwinding from wind pressure on the sail?

refent@prodigy.net

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest T. Nelson Surbrook

The line that goes around the drum is set in a jam cleat and this prevents the sail from un-furling when it is partially set. You don't have to put yourself in irons to roll it in. I copied the idea from a builder in Michigan, I can't remember his name maybe someone will and help out here. He posted pictures and a good discription of how to build a setup for 15 dollars. Mine cost about 20 dollars. The roller-furler is one of the best modifications I have made. No more going forward to work the jib and that means a added margin of saftey.

tnelson@surbrook.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Ray Frechette jr

I was figuring that maybe you used a cleat to hold it reefed.

I figure I would wait to see what Jake and Paul come up with. They promise to have it ready before next sailing season.

Then we'll figure out how to proceed.

refent@prodigy.net

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Graeme"SNUPI bui

Thanks Nelson,

One question I have ..... this may or may not be an issue, but I'm trying to cover all the bases in converting my Ronstan furler to a reefing furler.

Do you experience any torque effect on your tube ?

In other words, have you noticed any twisting of the semi-wound sail when partially reefed and under load ?

I'm leaning toward a fibre tube with the same idea for attaching the sail, but filling the tube with epoxy after placing another forestay sized straight tube inside / center to be a full length bearing, and a second removable ( coated with release agent)tube on the inside where the luff slot is.

Your thoughts ?

Graeme, Nova Scotia

graeme.realtor@ns.sympatico.ca

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest T. Nelson Surbrook

That'a a really good question and one that I thought of when putting the thing together. I don't understand why but I haven't seen any twisting at all. When I split the pvc pipe I tried twisting it by hand to see what it would do and I was able to put a nice twist in it. When I say a nice twist I mean maybe 15 or 20 degrees. I am not able to notice this when in use although I suspect it is twisting some, it's just not enough to show. I hope this is of some help.

tnelson@surbrook.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Graeme"SNUPI bui

Hi Nelson,

The "torgue" effect is one thing that is frequently mentioned in some of the information published with "BIG" boat's mega$$$$ furler/ reefing units .

These units use an extruded aluminum or stainless tube with all sorts of "fancy" names / shapes.

In my much smaller ( & cheaper) version, I'm counting on the semi-solid epoxy filled bonded tube resisting this torque twist.

Time will tell !

Graeme

graeme.realtor@ns.sympatico.ca

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It might be pretty hard to get the epoxy in there with no bubbles. Any thoughts on that? Perhaps it would be easier to use a thicker walled tube to start with, although I've no idea where you would find such a thing.

scolaway@yahoo.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Graeme"SNUPI bui

Hi Simon ..... Liquid epoxy pours very easily and a test 6" tube produced no problems.

Graeme

graeme.realtor@ns.sympatico.ca

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.