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Justin C

Jessy 15’ build log - Philadelphia, PA

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6 hours ago, Thrillsbe said:

What is the value of using pour foam in the forward compartment?  I prefer to simply seal off an air chamber.  Air is more buoyant than foam, and less expensive.

 

I am enjoying your build thread.  If I were to build another boat, it would be a Jessy (12?) with a center console and fishing deck on the forward half.  But I sort of already have that with my Bay River Skiff (minus the center console... so far).

IMG_4115.JPG

My 15’ has this general profile. It would be very similar. But, it’s not been a difficult build as of yet.

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2 hours ago, Justin C said:

This exactly! I’m looking to keep things clean. Figured since I have foam, I would form it outside and drop it in. I’ll use board foam in the aft compartments.

 

So you'll use the mock-up cardboard as a mold for the foam, and pour the foam in with the mold outside he boat? As the foam expands, it will push in all directions and de-form your cardboard box. you'll have to cut or sand the "bulges" off to make it fit into the boat. Well, at least we've given you some options to consider. Meanwhile, we're enjoying your build.

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Here is the completed foam mold in the forward lower compartment:

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The mix was a 1:1 ratio. Instructions said to work fast.

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It took about :45 to 1:00 for it to fully thicken, then rise. 
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16fl oz of each part filled 90% of the form. I then mixed up 2oz of each and filled in some low spots. 20min later, I broke apart the mold and used a saw to flatten the top.

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As you previously mentioned @Chick Ludwig, I will use board insulation for the larger compartments. I may box them out and use the remainder of the pour foam to fill them in. 
 

Next up is to either test paint and primer on some interior spaces if I get the garage warm. I also have to scribe the forward casting platform to fit snuggly. @Alan Stewart helped me out with how this will work. I’ll give it a shot soon. 

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What is a good recommendation for a general purpose surface cleaner to use on sanded epoxy wood? Ideally something I can buy locally at a hardware or box store. I’m thinking I should have the surface prepared properly before primer and paint. 

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8 minutes ago, Justin C said:

What is a good recommendation for a general purpose surface cleaner to use on sanded epoxy wood? Ideally something I can buy locally at a hardware or box store.  

 

Unless you have some how contaminated the surface almost anything will work  I clean with water and a sponge or rag in case of any blush.  Then I like to use alcohol as it assures there is no moisture left behind.  Most of the fancy cleaners are just mineral spirits with a little something else added so they can claim it is special and charge more.

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soap and water is good. Just a wipe down with denatured alcohol is what i typically do. Soap and water is pretty easy for the bottom through because it all sheds off. The inside is harder since you have to sponge everything out and rinse repeat. A scrub like comet and water on the outside would be good too but probably unnecessary unless you like spilled or splattered oil on the boat.  

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I hope everyone is enjoying their free time amid this craziness.  I am able to work from home and thus far, I had not had any issues. The weather up here has been getting warmer and I decided to use today to finish off all the interior joints with fiberglass tape. I used the flotation bay to be my wetting our area. I decided to use a small foam roller to both wet out the glass and the joints. It worked much faster then using a chip brush. 
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I also need to glass the hull. I don’t recall but I think I have to tape the chines before the hull is glassed. 

I am also wondering if I need to add another length (or two) to the interior sides where it meets the hull. I have one, shown below:

image.thumb.jpg.b4beac98ecc451b8ebe0efe8a752e79f.jpg

 

 

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Thanks for the pics. Looking good from here. 

On the chine joint we only specify a single layer of 10oz tape because the fiberglass reinforcement only needs to be as strong as the thickness of plywood it's reinforcing.

 

So in the case of the chine joint a single layer is sufficient because the side panel is only 6mm plywood. 

 

In the case of the keel joint, we are joining two layers of 12mm plywood so we use 2 layers of 10oz tape across the joint due to the added strength needed to match the strength of the plywood. 

 

On the outside of the boat the required glass is the same as the inside so when you sheath the exterior in 10oz glass all that is required is a single layer over the chine (don't forget to make it smooth and rounded for the glass to wrap the corner well). When you get to the keel line, overlap the keel by about 1 1/2" this way when you glass the other side and do the same overlap of the keel you now have the required 2 layers of glass on the exterior of the keel joint. 

 

 

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When is it advantageous to use foam over air?  Air is free.  If I’ve done a good job with the joints, I don’t see the need.  In the old days, we were concerned about causing rot underneath the foam.   I’m not trying to be snarky.  I’m trying to understand the advantages of foam.

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On 1/28/2020 at 9:29 AM, Alan Stewart said:

Don,  Short answer... the CG requires foam not air for powerboats. If you don't use foam, you're putting the required USCG capacity plaque saying the boat is CG certified for this many ppl but you're really not technically in compliance. I would argue that the BRS is a sailboat and so it is not bound by this requirement BUT if you're using it mostly as a motorboat and leaving the sailing rig at home for example, you might have a hard time convincing the CG that you're not a powerboat (like if you didn't have the capacity plaque installed). For a more longwinded reply see earlier in this thread. Here...

 

 

 

 

 

I refer you to this previous post. :)

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12 hours ago, Alan Stewart said:

On the outside of the boat the required glass is the same as the inside so when you sheath the exterior in 10oz glass all that is required is a single layer over the chine (don't forget to make it smooth and rounded for the glass to wrap the corner well). When you get to the keel line, overlap the keel by about 1 1/2" this way when you glass the other side and do the same overlap of the keel you now have the required 2 layers of glass on the exterior of the keel joint. 

@Alan Stewart Sorry if I’m over thinking this, but glass tape over the outside chine first, then covered in glass cloth? I get the overlapping on the keel section as I did on the inside with the tape. 
 

Also, I received the extended hatch cover in good order - thank you. Can you recommend a piano hinge? I’d there a method to affixing this that is different than normal? What would be a good mechanism to keep the hatch closed - simple pop up swivel closure?

 

 

 

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Put another way, if you glass the outside with cloth then you dont need tape on the chine. The cloth does the job. The keel needs 2 layers so overlapping the cloth does the job. 

 

Any stainless piano hinge will do the job. Short screws to attach. You might have to grind the tips off to keep them poking through or use longer screws and... drill, screw, remove screws, cut and gring them down, reinstall. 

 

Ive been wanting to try those rubber hatch closures lately. Or a hasp and staple latch. Maybe like this. https://images.app.goo.gl/yHu2tkTiAtrBq9Ny6

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I used to build small fiberglass boats as a profession, and had to have them flotation tested by a USCG approved facility. In addition, an inspector would visit my place of business yearly. He made it clear that any small boat using a motor, needed to meet the flotation requirements. This included dinghies, row boats, motor canoes, or electric powered boats. BUT, at some point, a small sailboat not depending on power is somehow not included. I'm not quite sure how that works.

 

I always use foam flotation in my boats. Further confusing things is the "upright and level" requirement. Tough to figure that one out. I just do my best.

 

The Jessy 15 is definitely a power boat, so, foam it is!

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Thanks for the explanation.  So, if I ever convert Local Honey to 100% power (in my old age), I’ve gotta buy some floatation foam.

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I got the boat flipped over for work on the bottom, chines and hull sides. I modified the cradle with some 2x stock to give it a better platform. 

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I used a block and a hand plane to remove the excess material where the gears meet. I also made a few longitudinal passes on the keel and chines. 
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When I epoxied the interior pieces, I squeezed out the excess epoxy on the rollers on the hull sides. This probably wasn’t the best idea as there were a lot of hardened drips I had to sand off today. 
 

Anyway, I’m going to focus on prepping the chines and keel then I’ll get the glass cloth laid out.

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2 days of boat work in a row! I rounded the chines to what I think is a nice radius. I also slightly flattened the keel line. 
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I then cut some 60 grit sandpaper and spray glued it to a piece of scrap 2x4 - my version of a longboard. 

 

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I believe longboards are supposed to flex, and conform to the curvature of the hill.  A 1/4”

x4” board might be a better choice.

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