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Steve W

Trailer for Core Sound Mark 3 boats.

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I mount the bunks on edge and shape them to fit the hull. I prefer that the bunks carry most of the weight, as the center rollers can deform the hull if the keel isn't stiff enough. I think that's the case the way we use a big epoxy "fillet" down the center in place of a wood keelson. Guess I'm kinda paranoid about this, but back-in-the-day when my business was boat repair, I saw a lot of damage from trailers.

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Dave,

I did not modify the bunks for the Belhaven trailer.  Laid flat the way they are, they deflect pretty well to match the bottom of the boat.  My thinking was to have the good support beneath the 350lb keel and then hold the plywood portion of the boat up with the bunks.

One annoying aspect of bunk set-up is that the bolt holes for height adjustments are in one inch increments.  I got it close but should really go back and put a spacer between the bracket and the bunk to get the forward elevation of the bunk correct.  Lots of "trailer trial and error", really no other way around it.

One last recommendation specific to the Belhaven - Since she needs 10 inches to float and is pretty big to push around you really want to keep the boat as low as possible on the trailer or you won't be able to launch at shallow ramps.  

  

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The bunks are just for balancing, so a little flex is actually good.  The 2x4s on my trialer for my 15'-8" Lapwing flex just enough to hug a bit of curve when pressure is exerted.  2x6s seems right for a 20 foot boat.  The spacing of the brackets will effect flex a lot too.  Mine are covered in PVC instead of carpet, easy to slide.

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Reading this thread makes me feel guilty about what my CS 20 sits on. About 14 years ago I bought a used 1987 trailer that had an 18' inboard outboard sitting on it for $250. . The 14" tires were new. It is galvanized and looks like it has lived in many places. The boat rests on  7' 4" 2x4 bunks with carpet and some keel rollers. The back of the boat hangs over the back of the bunks by about 3 1/2 ft.  4 years ago I bought new tires and had the bearings packed. I squirt grease into the bearing buddies occasionally. I live in the Denver area. The trailer and boat have been to Lake Superior,  Anacortes, WA (boat to Friday Harbor), the Texas 200 3 times. I  have not had a flat tire or an trailer problem. I should have taken a leaf out of the trailer but I did not so it is a stiff ride for the boat.  Pore thing.

 

So I m probably due some bad luck this year when I drag the boat to Port Isabel for the Texas 200 again. It is about 2500 miles round trip. Gotta buy a cartridge for the grease gun and check the tire pressure.

 

 

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Extend the bunks to the end just at or just past the transom face. It'll save a "hook" issue later on.

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I'm running into either trailers that are way to heavy for the boat or light but just a bit short. But I have a 21 foot long Sea Pearl on a Continental trailer that I really like. The boat hangs off in the rear by at least 3 feet. I've found that Continental makes a similar trailer for a john boat. These trailers have some desirable things. Adjustable axle fore and aft. A good flat footprint to mount stuff to. Low profile of fenders.

 

Model JB1812. https://www.continentaltrailers.com/galvanized-bassboat_jonboat.htm

 

It looks perfect, but the boat would hang off the back by almost 1.5 feet. I'm thinking that would be OK. But I want to get a blessing. What do you think?

 

Then I have to figure out how to get it here from Florida. I'm closing in on actually needing it!

 

Steve

 

 

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It's typical for sailboats to hang off the back to balance the load to give the correct tongue weight, which is 10%-15% of the total load. A benefit of this is that you can often not have to back the wheels all the way in, or you can float the boat off easier without backing off the end of short ramps.

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5 hours ago, Steve W said:

"It looks perfect, but the boat would hang off the back by almost 1.5 feet. I'm thinking that would be OK. But I want to get a blessing. What do you think?"

 

Steve, my Navigator hangs off the back by about that much and I think it is fine.  10 years of experience with this setup.

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, Steve W said:

but the boat would hang off the back by almost 1.5 feet. I'm thinking that would be OK

Mine hangs over the back a lot more- no need to get the tyres wet never mind the trailer or bearings.

Peter HK

tn_P9150058.JPG

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If the weight of the boat is well supported by the centerline rollers and the bunks, just keep it from flopping over in over the road maneuvers, the aft overhang will leave no long term ill affects.

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I ordered it. Now I have to figure out how to get it to NY from Jacksonville when it gets to the dealer in about 2 weeks. Thanks for all the help and thoughts.

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My trailer for my 15'-8" Lapwing is marketed as a 12-14 foot boat with motor trailer.  It balances at 10% tongue weight and the keel is supported on rollers to about 3.5 feet from transom.  My only regret is not getting a wider wheelbase/lower slung trailer.  With more of you building the Mk3 you should be able to identify a couple good models to work with.

DSCN3709.JPG

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I wound up finally getting the Continental trailer I bought up to my house in NY. I am close to moving Jazz Hands out of the basement. The good news is it was only $1085 dollars. The bad news is I had to pay $645 to get it from the northernmost Continental dealer in Jacksonville. I have a Sea Pearl on a similar trailer and I really like it. This one doesn't tilt like my SP trailer, and it's wider and longer. The smaller tires have never been a problem and keep the fenders low and the boat lower to the ground which makes climbing up on the boat easier and launching in shallower water easier.

 

51792373_2018-07-1307_35_07.thumb.jpg.89289716e94271274c0ebafe634975fd.jpg Other upsides are light weight and a weight rating more in line with the boat than heavier built trailers. The bunks are very adjustable and the brackets look real sturdy.  I need to figure out a way to add center rollers.  I'll also probably add a tongue jack and a spare tire.

 

The only negative is the axle isn't adjustable fore and aft. Like many trailers the manufacturer's figure you are going to have a heavy motor on the back so the axle is about a foot further back than I think would be best. My gut says the boat will sit just a bit back so that the tongue can be cut a bit shorter. I'll sort that out last.  I want to put one of those tongue hinges in so I can easily store this in my garage.

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You can buy rollers and brackets on Amazon or E-bay to fit on the cross members and tongue of the trailer. You would want to replace the bunk pad on the tongue with a roller. Also spare tire and carrier. I'd also suggest PVC guide poles to center the boat as you load it.

 

As for balance, just move the winch stand back until you have 10% - 15% of the load on the hitch. This also moves the boat to where it will float on and off easier. Leaving the tongue at it's full length also gets the boat farther back into the water.  The tongue hinge will still let you get it into the garage.

 

I turned the bunks on edge and cut them to fit the contour of the bottom of the boat, but that was because mine only were supported at the ends. With three support brackets, you should be able to bend the bunks to fit the bottom.

 

That was a fair price for the trailer. Too bad about  the freight cost. I'm paying over $1400 for the trailer for my new boat, and I still have to go get it about 1 1/2 hour away. Mine lets the boat set below the fenders to get it lower. Some of our ramps on the mountain lakes are very shallow.

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Chick, one of the most frustration things about this purchase was that none of the dealers had accurate PDF drawings of their trailers and as soon as I said "Sailboat" they didn't want to talk to me. Do you think that rollers on just the cross members is good enough or should I run a longitudinal beam to mount more?

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Steve,

 

You almost cannot have too many rollers. I find that if you do not have enough rollers, they distort and get out of round and then the difficulty begins.  I am wondering if you cannot put two rollers on each frame, one bracket and roller on the forward side and another set on the aft side with the bolts through both sets of brackets. While they will not be evenly spaced, if properly adjusted it will share the load over a lot more rollers.

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I kinda "go against the grain" on how best to support a boat constructed without a heavy keel. I carry most of the load on the bunks rather than the rollers. It doesn't make it any harder to launch and retrieve as the boat is backed far enough into the water to float on and off. As Graham says, the rollers can distort the bottom. Seems like two rollers on the same frame doesn't give enough separation. Another thing that helps is to have the roller located beneath a bulkhead, but that usually doesn't work out as you have no choice of where the trailer cross frames are located. The bunks spread the load over a long distance on the bottom, and there should be bulkheads crossing the area that they support. That's why I like the bunks on edge and cut to fit. The brackets aren't made to support the wood bunk on edge, so you would need new brackets. Another option to make the bunks stiffer with the brackets you have is to stack two 2x4s together. I'd lay them together with the brackets loose but attached, then jack the bunks up until the load of the boat is carried on the bunk. Then tighten the brackets and lag the two 2x4s together. You'd already have carpet on the top one so the jobs done.

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Chick,

 

In an ideal world, most of what you say is true. Carlita's trailer layout is similar to the one that Steve has just bought, there is a roller on each frame and one forward on the fore and aft centerline member. Carlita has criss crossed the country up and down, sideways and diagonally with around 16 - 18 k road miles under her by now. I cannot find any issues with her hull. I can find all sorts of issues with her rollers and brackets, none of them roll very well and I am having to dunk most of the trailer to launch the boat. I prefer to not to dunk the trailer at all.

 

How can it hurt the boat by doubling the number of rollers so that each roller will not be as heavily loaded. While not evenly spaced, they will be about 6" apart which does cut down the unsupported span and reduces the point loading.

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Graham, I looked real carefully at Carlita's trailer at the MASCF. I liked how low it was.

 

I can see what you are saying. My plan right now is when I put the boat on the trailer, I'll spit the bunks so they support the boat on the longitudinal bulkheads of the module. Then I'll be able to get a good idea what I need to buy to support the keel. I see they make rubber and sort of a more dense yellowish plastic of some sort. I'm assuming those are better? Please advise everybody. 

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