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Chick Ludwig

Chick's Micro Power Cruiser Project.

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Today was supposed to be "Sand the poxied cabin and locker spaces day that I coated last Friday, day.", but, I tried and Mr. Sander just kept clogging his discs. I guess the slow hardener, cool nights, and whatever else just is gonna take a bit longer to cure hard enough to sand. Maybe the 120 grit discs are a little too fine? I usually use 80 grit discs, which on the dual action finishing sander work well. But, never fear. We found something else to occupy a bit of the day.

 

Another coat of poxy in the "under sole" area and flotation boxes. Then, the cockpit sole assembly was built and poxied on the bottom. I turned the 6mm ply so the main grain would go cross ways. That meant I had to splice on a little piece since the sole is over 4 feet long. Truth be told, that wasn't so much for strength as to make best use of the plywood I had. All the full sheets have been cut up already, so the sole came out of a "left over" piece. I think that if I'm careful, there are enough left overs to finish the boat. I hope.

 

Only one picture for y'all today. Remember the "notches" left along the tops of the cross frames that I showed ya last time? And I said that I'd explain later? Well, here ya go. The stringers attached to the bottom of the sole fit into the notches. Tomorrow, I'll flip it over and glass the top, then, if it cures enough to mess with, I'll pucky it in it's place in the cockpit.

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If you’re gumming up, you’re spinning too fast with too fine (which, I don’t think 120 is) or you’re not cured yet.

PAR set me straight with a ton of literature on epoxy not long ago, and I learned that it cures over time. Sometimes it takes 48 hours, sometimes it takes 100. It’s like paint, though, in that “dry” doesn’t mean “cured” necessarily.

 

Just wait a few days. I just took some 120 to my long suffering leeboard, faring glass and smoothing the schmootz, and it never clogged. It cut clean and left a very smooth surface, in fact, which surprised me a bit, actually.

 

Yes, I was using the wood eraser, not the long board.

 

And, yes, 120 grit paper, on a 7” disc, spinning 500rpm will just eat away your knee, too. I got me a doozy of a scab to prove it. ;)

 

Peace,

Robert

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14 hours ago, Action Tiger said:

If you’re gumming up, you’re spinning too fast with too fine (which, I don’t think 120 is) or you’re not cured yet.

Agreed, Tiger. I'm gonna wait awhile to finish. No way to slow down Mr. Sander, and NO WAY I'm gonna hand sand! WAY to lazy, and WAY too much shoulder pain to do THAT.

Speaking of Knee sanding...I often sand living parts while trying to sand the silly boat. At least I haven't lost anything to Mr. Table Saw recently!

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The trick to long boarding by “hand” is to use the body. It’s like throwing a ball. The arm mostly holds the ball and the body does all the whipping of the arm.

 

Same same with the long board. I call it the hula. Enough sway in the hips and the arms just hold on and apply a little pressure.

 

Just in case. :)

 

Peace,

Robert

 

This curing drives me nuts, sometimes. The orange boat is not a spot where things are being glassed in small areas, and I have to wait to feather the layers as I go. It’s tedious, but really the best way.

It is the sole reason I always have some easily stopped/started side project. For the waiting...

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Kinda hard to use the long board for sanding the resin coat inside the cabin, under the sole, etc. I'd love to see pics of the Tiger down inside a locker using it!

 

Got the cockpit sole glassed on top and installed today. Picture in my next installment of this excitin' adventure.

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No work on the boat today. Miss Debbie and I went for a day cruise down on Lake Keowee, about an hour and fifteen minutes away from home. We had a great time. This is the first we've been out this year! Too busy with boat building and life. Not to mention the aggravation moving everything out of the way to get the great whale al-u-minium boat out of the carport. On top of moving things out of the way, Turtler had a flat tire on his trailer that wouldn't roll to pull him out of the way. Had to cram myself down between the boats to change the wheel Bagh!!! Dumb excuses of course. Speaking of "life". Between commitments with the kids at church, and relatives from out of town, I won't be able to work on the boat until next Wednesday at the earliest.

 

To catch y'all up, yesterday I hung Mr. Tohatsu on the back to check clearances for the upcoming motor splash well and the fuel and battery stowage locker. Did I tell ya about raising the transom height---twice---to match the long shaft motor rather than the short shaft I'd originally planned on? Well, guess what. Turns out that the transom now is too high! I had to cut an inch of my additions back off! Kinda like the guy trying to cut the leg on his kitchen chair that was wobbling saying, "I've cut it off three times, and it's STILL too short!" Anyway, I found out what I needed to know, so, next job is building the storage locker/splash well.

 

Here's a coupla pictures for ya.

First one is of Mr. Tohatsu sitting as big as life on the transom, with the battery and tank in their future homes. The one inch hasn't been cut off yet.

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Next is the jam-packed boat storage area in my carport.

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