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Spindrift 10 build

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Thanks Alan, I really want to finish it soon so that its done and I can move on to something else. I have gotten a large amount of satisfaction building this little boat, which I hope can be amplified by a new larger and more complex build. Do you see any issues with what I have done so far? I would love any input you have. 

 

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So if your pumps gel up as Alan talked about a few posts earlier, rather than taking them apart to clean, just put the resin jug with the pump in it in a big pot (not from your kitchen) with a spacer to keep the jug off the surface a bit (I used an old tile) while you heat it. Once the resin gets hot enough to take the crystals out, just pump the now warmed softened resin through the clogged pump into a cup. Pump enough epoxy the pump runs free. Dump the resin back into the jug after removing the pump. Done. Much easier than taking apart to "clean". I can speak from much experience dealing with cold. 

 

The S10 is looking great.

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I would forget the pumps altogether. I now only use syringes. They are cheaper, more accurate and a lot faster than pumps. Here is a link for 150ml syringes on ebay for you to have a look at. I use a few different sizes and can easily measure accurately as small as 3ml batches. That you can't do with pumps.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Pro-150ML-Plastic-Reusable-Syringe-Tube-Pipe-Sterile-Injectio-Measuring-Nutrient/142061882380?hash=item21138c4c0c:g:kasAAOSwaB5XkcjC

 

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Thanks everybody, I have been using a digital scale to measure everything out to the gram, so no need to worry about the pumps. I will warm it up if any crystals are present. I bought a small space heater last time home and had it under the overturned hull while I glassed it because it was a little cool and I wanted to make sure the epoxy didn't take forever to harden, seemed to work well. I may go buy a bigger one that will keep the garage nice and warm for the frigid (for Florida!) temps we are expecting for the next week. Dont know how guys up north do it, I spent several years in the North Atlantic working and I swore that I would never expose myself to those conditions ever again. 

Hulsey 

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Good comments. If you're working on a scale for mixing just make sure you take into account the density difference since the mix ratio is 2:1 by volume. 

 

Last time I weighed them 1 gal or resin was 9.5 lbs and a 1 gal of hardener was only 8.2 lbs (with the jugs included) so by my calc that's approximately 2.3 to 1 by mass. 

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Thank Alan,

I am using US Composites 635 epoxy as I used it when I re-did my Mako 25 several years ago and was familiar with it 1 part to .32 by density, I measure out the resin and multiply by 1.32 and it gives me the total by volume, and fill it up with hardener to that weight.

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Yeah, most discover after some time, the pumps not as convenient as they'd hoped and move to weighing or syringes. I too use syringes and find all the things Alan says true, plus if you have some smaller, yet larger bore ones, you can precisely apply it into places that are exceedingly difficult with other methods. I was repairing a veneer teak, I did a few years ago, where the sun had opened a few seams and they'd started to buckle or blister in a few voids, inadvertently produced initially. Some I simply squirted some goo into and mashed them down under a brick, while others (about a half a dozen places total on this aft deck) I slit open the seams, propped it open and then squirted some goo in, before mashing it back down. I have several sizes for this, but the tip is what counts, so usually I use a 100 - 150 ML syringe and cut the tip back, so it can flow easily enough to not unseat the rubber plunger. On this deck I used a 75 ML and put a length of vinyl tubing on the tip, so I could get it under the seams. I did have to heat the epoxy ever so much (maybe 90 degrees), to get a good flow through the tubing, but I use a super slow mix, so still plenty of working time at this temperature.

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Got home Thrusday night, sanding and filleting and taping. Fill coat on the hull. Hope to finish up all the center cockpit taping and filleting today and cut out the aft bulk head, ceterboard trunk, and cut out and glue up the centerboard......maybe! 

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Got the center cockpit filleted and taped, fliped it over and put the finial fill coat on the hull. Tried using a roller to roll out the epoxy which I had added a small amount of cabisol to, seemed to just spread it on the top on the weave, switched to a squegee and it worked much better to fill the weave. I also got the aft locker bulkhead, and centerboard trunk cut out. Will try to do the centerboard trunk and centerboard glue up today

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You may want to use Q-cell or micro balloons as a filler. Cabosil is mighty hard to sand! But, it is clear when saturated, so if you want to varnish, you can't use Cabosil. I just squeegee on another layer of straight poxy.

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Cut out the center board and planed it to shape, cut out the centerboard trunk pieces and got a coat of epoxy on them. Got the "optional" aft bulkhead installed and filleted. Got then keel ready to go as well. Now to flip it back over and instal the keel and maybe a little fairing of the hull.

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Nice to see another S10 taking shape, I will be following your progress with interest.

What type of wood did you use for the stringers and other framing?

 

I have just started easing into building mine after years of sitting on the plans. Better late than never!

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All cleats and 3/4 material were SYP or Doug Fir I had laying around. The knees and breast hook are Sapele, the gunnels are popular and oak. Good luck with yours!

 

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On 1/3/2018 at 11:11 AM, Steve W said:

So if your pumps gel up as Alan talked about a few posts earlier, rather than taking them apart to clean, just put the resin jug with the pump in it in a big pot (not from your kitchen) with a spacer to keep the jug off the surface a bit (I used an old tile) while you heat it. Once the resin gets hot enough to take the crystals out, just pump the now warmed softened resin through the clogged pump into a cup. Pump enough epoxy the pump runs free. Dump the resin back into the jug after removing the pump. Done. Much easier than taking apart to "clean". I can speak from much experience dealing with cold. 

 

The S10 is looking great.

 

I've used a heat gun on the pump and it worked well.  I've also put in the microwave for a few seconds.  

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Well, I didnt get as much done as I had wanted in my three week release from prison....(ship) but here is a short summery

Keel: went really well I think, I dont think I carried it as far forward as I could have but I am fairly sure it will be fine, I used a gouge and chisel to hollow it out a bit and glued her down with epoxy-milled fibers-cabosil mix. oh and I drove the gouge in to my index finger tip far enough to split my nail - do not do that! 

 

Centerboard trunk: after coating the inside with the three coats, glued it together, and routered all the edges and put a fillet on the underside of the side strongbacks. Also routered the underside of the crossbeams with the same round over bit. I ran a center line string, leveled the boat at the transom port and Starbd and used a square, and pocket level to ensure plumb, put a screw in the back cross beam and clamped the front to some scrap. Then filleted and taped 

 

Seat top: I used some "RAM board" from homedepot ( thanks PAR for the idea) to make the template, I tried doing it in two pieces and then tapping them together, didnt like the way it looked, so I cut the out side and used my rough inside marks and added three inches and cut it out rough. - I did that the morning of crew change, not wife approved to work on the boat the day you leave! 

 

A big reason I didnt get as far as I wanted- the cold, very cold (for Florida) this time home, I had a small space heater running all the time to get my epoxy to dry on a schedule which didnt need a calendar. After running that heater so much my wife suggested skin to boat contact would provide the best warmth! OH and I did a shit load of sanding and coating trying to get the magic three coats on everything. Getting closer 

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Oh I wanted to ask you guys, what overhang on the seattop should I have 3/4"? I plan to run a fillet under the lip to or do you think that is un-needed?

Thanks again for all the help

Hulsey 

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Mine doesn't have any except as the seat tops taper outwards towards the corners by the stern and as it tapers outwards towards the thwarts.  Check my thread, I think I have pictures.  

 

Sealing the seat tops to the seat bulkheads is a good idea to ensure the airtight compartments are airtight. 

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Thanks Walt,

I was looking at the drawings and after the aft centerboard/thwart beam it looked like there was a little over hang, I was thinking on 1/2-3/4" so that I could "true up" any of the lines to ensure a fair shape. That little of a overhang with a fillet underneath should not make it a catch point, I was even thinking of cutting a small strip of ply and gluing it to the underside of said lip so that I could round it over to have a clean little bullnose, instead of the fillet. I have a couple weeks to think about it anyway. Thanks for your response, I will check your thread. 

Hulsey 

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Alan did something similar with his CS15: towards the stern where the seat sides meet the stern seat, he put plywood so that there is no lip.  Check through his videos on YouTube.  I

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Walt,

I have seen the video series, I think he only did it in the corners. In reality I may not do anything, I get some pretty grand ideas being away from it three weeks at a time! I really am to the point of just wanting to finish the damn thing in time for spring.......I mean summer. haha

 

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