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For drilling a prop shaft....


thull
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It also depends on how you're setting up for this bore. If you'll be eyeballing it, maybe with a length of something to keep you somewhat on plane, the auger is the way to go. On the other hand if you can insure the bore will track true, such as a jig or some sort of boring or drilling machine, any bit will do, though the paddle will be faster and more accurate, if you've drilled an appropriate pilot hole for the point to follow. If you're eyeballing it, drill from both ends and meet in the middle of the bore. No the two holes will not be perfectly aligned, but bit wander will be only half of what it is, compaired to drilling from one side only. Just drill over size and let the mismatch be what it is.

 

On  holes more than a foot or so, I like to setup a jig, that holds and aligns the bit as it goes into the work. This can be as simple as a length of wood, with a notch along its length, so the bit can ride in the groove, during the bore. It's propped/braced into position and then the bit dropped in for the big push.

 

 

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2 hours ago, PAR said:

 If you're eyeballing it, drill from both ends and meet in the middle of the bore. No the two holes will not be perfectly aligned, but bit wander will be only half of what it is, compaired to drilling from one side only.

 

 

Not only this, but both ends of the hole will be located properly which is usually rather important and the inaccuracy will be hidden.

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I saw a cool, home made tool for boring long holes many years ago. It was a regular paddle bit, welded to a length of bar stock and it had a few HDPE cylindrical spacers placed along its length. These spacers fit just ever so loosely into a length of pipe, which was jigged up at the appropriate angle on the deadwood assembly. The pipe kept the spacers square with the axis of the bore and the bit had no choice but to follow. Very clever and simple farm boy engineering.

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