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IDK, I think I'd use a Sawzall to cut out as much of the centerboard trunk as possible while leaving the cap and thwarts intact.  Maybe you can angle a new centerboard trunk underneath the existing thwarts and re-use the cap on the new one.   You can first back out the screws holding the thwarts to the trunk by heating them with a soldering iron.  Then I'd use a rotary tool to try to route out the bad wood around the batten and step so that you can inspect both.  I'd also try to use the rotary tool to cut the joint between the bulkhead and the trunk.  

 

Rotary tools are great for routing off excess epoxy and wood.  

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Pick up a cheap Harbor Freight oscillating multi tool and use this to cut the case free. You should be able to angle it into the hard to reach spaces, freeing the thwart, stringer, even the bulkhead and seat top from the case. Of course, you can remove it in pieces, which will make things easier. These multi tools tend to make much less dust than rotary tools and you can plunge cut stuff, flush with surrounding areas easily.

 

As previously mentioned, it's best to build the case separately on a bench, so you can insure it's straight, square and plumb, with a perpendicular pivot bolt hole. Once you're sure, disassemble it and fit the pieces into the boat. I know you're a bit intimidated, but this isn't all that bad a repair. Sliding in a new case will be easiest if you can remove the thwart, though you could sneak it under if necessary. 

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Paul beat me to the punch here.  I have the Makita multi tool.  With one of these, just about anything is possible with good blades.  Remove the thwart, and see how far you can get.  Even if you make the hole for the CB trunk a little oversized you can set the new one in, and then fill with putty and glass around it.  

 

 

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On 5/11/2017 at 1:45 AM, PAR said:

Pick up a cheap Harbor Freight oscillating multi tool and use this to cut the case free. You should be able to angle it into the hard to reach spaces, freeing the thwart, stringer, even the bulkhead and seat top from the case. Of course, you can remove it in pieces, which will make things easier. These multi tools tend to make much less dust than rotary tools and you can plunge cut stuff, flush with surrounding areas easily.

 

As previously mentioned, it's best to build the case separately on a bench, so you can insure it's straight, square and plumb, with a perpendicular pivot bolt hole. Once you're sure, disassemble it and fit the pieces into the boat. I know you're a bit intimidated, but this isn't all that bad a repair. Sliding in a new case will be easiest if you can remove the thwart, though you could sneak it under if necessary. 

 

I should've bought one of these instead of a corner sander.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yes, I have a Harbor Freight oscillating multi tool. I used it, a pull saw and a few other things. The centerboard trunk is out and I have started cleaning up the edges of the whole. How were the screws from inside of the trunk into the keel batten installed? I had to use pliers to get them out.

hole.png

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  • 1 month later...

I have cleaned up the area around the centerboard hole and found the hull and keel batten to be in good shape. I'm cutting a template for the trunk side out of that cheap thin ply found at Lowe's. (I call it door skin, but don't know the proper name.) I noticed on the plan a curved dashed line 1/8 " at the top edge of the trunk. Anybody know what that is about?

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  • 10 months later...

The only thing harder than building a centerboard trunk is building a replacement. I found that the original builder hadn't followed the instructions very closely. But it was necessary to use some of the old trunk dimensions in order for it to fit back in this boat. I believe that the trunk rot was caused by the failure to glass the external seam between the trunk and hull.

 

The whole process took about a year and a half. There were delays for weather and medical issues. There was a lot of trial fitting and sanding. I had help the day I glassed the trunk to the inside of the hull but the rest was a solo effort. A few weeks ago I got the trunk and cockpit sole painted and the hardware reinstalled. I had one really nice five hour sail in 10-15 knots. Then I hurt my back. Now it over 90 degrees so I probably won't get back in the water until fall.

 

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