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Jbkillam

Short Shot FROG

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FINALLY, it's my turn to post a FROG photo.

Many thanks to everyone that posted photos.  the pics were very helpful during throughout my build.

FWIW: okume 12mm ply, cedar 4"x4"x10' ripped into stringers (scarfed using Titebond 3), "Tandy" brand polyester flat artificial sinew, laminated oak coaming (1.25" tall with .5"x.5" lip), 28 lbs with coaming and foot braces.

 

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Here are a couple more pictures.

I used Gorilla glue to laminate the coaming.  Will coat coaming with spar varnish.

The only modification is how the top rear center deck stringer is lashed to the frame. The idea is so I can cut the stringer flush to the front of the frame for a "cleaner" look (haven't done it yet. Not sure it's a good idea).

 

the coaming length is 34" but the aft diameter is 17" and the fwd diameter is 9" with straight lines connecting the two circles.

FWIW, I used a steam bent 1/8" strips to create half the coaming then switched to the heat gun method as shown in Jeff's video (his method takes much less effort at is much less stressful than steam bending!).

 

Also, I used poplar for the seat slats thinking they would better take the load than cedar (the cedar probably would've been fine).

 

I'll be covering using "840 xtra tuff nylon" and two part urethane mix from Corey Freedmans skin boat store (will keep you all posted)

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Beautiful work! And I like that you shared some detail pics too.

I only just installed the foot braces on my Short Shot this week. I was torn between the 1" stringer or the 3/4" on which to mount to. I went with the 3/4 as you did. I think it was the best decision for foot positioning.

Your coaming looks sweet too! I've been trying to finish mine up so I can start the covering. Soon I hope.

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Ok, I ditched the gusset idea and returned to its original configuration. The deck beam won't protrude too far past the coaming to poke me in the back. I'll have a back band anyway.

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Backband should be 4" give or take from the frame so no, it shouldn't be a problem.  Cutting it off is probably a bad idea. The frame is not rigid and does flex. If the joint became loos the stringer could shift and fall out.  See, there is a method to my madness.   ;)   

 

What you see in the manual is exactly how I build my boats. If you have me build  you a complete boat, it is going to built just like I show.  That is one of the reasons I don't recommend or support modifications, what you see in the plans and Assembly manual is proven to work and work well.

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ok, on to the fun part. skinning the boat. i found this to be very rewarding and surprisingly relaxing! I'm using 840 extra tuff nylon from the skin boat store.  

I watched Jeff's video on fabric selection and sewing methods (method depends upon the type of fabric one uses).  once again, I used nylon. I elected to use the welting cord method. I could not have done it without all the information and contributions published on the web (thanks to all for taking the time to do so). 

here are the links to the videos demonstrating the method I decided to use. the first one is from Cape Falcon Kayaks: How to sew a new 'skin' on a skin-on-frame kayak - YouTube I used this technique to make the pockets for the bow and stern. However I only sewed up the bow 2.5" short instead of the 4" he recommends (Im glad I did. stretching the 2.5" was hard enough).

 

the other video that guides you through the process is from the Skin Boat School.  Skin on Frame Kayak Building: Sewing with Welting Cord Corey cinches up the stitches by hand.  I used a dowel after cutting my finger when the sinew slipped through my finger under tension (ouch).

 

I used the nylon artificial sinew and the welting cord sold by Corey. The welting cord he sells is 1/8" rigid plastic. its rigidity makes it easier to maintain a straight stitches (It is totally worth the 25 cents per foot price) Ha! I think it is upholstery piping. it works great what ever it is. Just get some, you won't regret it! 

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not sure if all this info belongs in the FROG section, But its the best I can do. I wanted to mention that I found trimming the fabric with a hot knife to be worth every penny. Not to mention it makes a very satisfying sound when cutting. The cutter used in the videos are the german manufactured hot knife that runs $200 plus!  I found this one from Carolina knife Co. for $99 Bucks (plus $20 shipping)! hot_cut_knife It appears to be of good quality and sturdy. it doesn't have the led light to illuminate your work, but I didn't think it really needed one.

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Impressive sewing for a first boat!  And thanks for the link to the hot knife. That must be fairly new to the market.  The ones I use are industrial quality hnice the price, but they were the only thing on the market 5 years ago.

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Thanks Jeff, I think the rigidity of the welting cord helped keep things straight. I'll bet one could probably find it at a fabric store. Also, there is a hot knife sold by Sailrite that looks to be from the the same manufacturer but comes with a cutting foot for $139.  http://www.sailrite.com/Sailrite-Edge-Hotknife-Package-110-Volt  

Oh yeah, I can't help myself from thumping the skin every time I go into the garage for something! 

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