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Core Sound 17 keel maintenance


greendane
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There are plenty of dark boats in the Pacific Northwest that don't seem to have heat problems, so I wouldn't worry about the heat issue especially on the exterior of a hull without a cabin.  The really light colors show dirt quicker, but that's not a deal breaker either.  A color that contrasts with the water is more visible.  I can think of one boat that blends in so well with a chop that she is hard to see at a distance. 

 The rest is "season to taste".   Yellow sounds good to me.

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Yellow it will be. 

 

Now I am trying to hunt down a deal on a galvanized trailer...almost found one on Craigslist today for a mere $260 (though it came with a CLark boat!). But it isn't long enough. Washington State RCW only allows overhang of four feet max and this one didn't have quite enough length on the tongue. https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/bpo/6116905587.html

 

I looked into possibly extending it, but it wouldn't take long to get closer to price of new (or others I've seen in the $600-700 range). 

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If the paints are the same type (alkyd, acrylic, LPU, etc.) you can mix a little of the finish color into the primer to get it closer to the finish color. I do this often to ease the issue you've mentioned. I use a few different color primers, though typically I need a couple of final coats, to level things off and this is when I'll tint the primer with the appropriate color.

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4 hours ago, greendane said:

Yellow it will be. 

 

Now I am trying to hunt down a deal on a galvanized trailer...almost found one on Craigslist today for a mere $260 (though it came with a CLark boat!). But it isn't long enough. Washington State RCW only allows overhang of four feet max and this one didn't have quite enough length on the tongue. https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/bpo/6116905587.html

 

I looked into possibly extending it, but it wouldn't take long to get closer to price of new (or others I've seen in the $600-700 range). 

I'm buying a Trailex brand new.  There are cheaper options, such as a Harbor Freight trailer, but they all require a lot of work.  

 

Cheap trailers seem easy to find in areas with a lot of small boats, like the East Coast. 

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@Walt S. - yes, there are several here in the Pacific NW too. Galvanized is prized like gold though. Easy enough to find new ones for about $1000. For example here: http://www.kingtrailers.com/trailers_c158082.html are manufactured about 25 minutes from here.  And CL has new ones every day (https://seattle.craigslist.org/search/sss?query=boat trailer&sort=rel) but I'm holding out for a deal. With my existing (it's one of these (http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200612544_200612544) with a longer tongue, and bunks and rollers added), even if I just clean it up and paint it to get through another year, I still need to replace all the rollers (4 of them) and the deck that the rollers are on (it's plywood). So I'll probably be about $200-$300 into it plus the time of scrubbing the rust off, etc. Many of the trailers I see will need some form of modification (a couple of rollers added or bunks). I'm hoping to limit my total investment to $500 mostly because I still have to buy new masts and, well, "Bet On Another Thousand" = B.O.A.T. becomes more and more true all the time! :-)

 

IMG_4589.JPG

trailer.jpg

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Another thousand is only .5 boatbux.  

 

I thought about buying an old trailer and fixing it up but decided I need to finish the boat project which should end in about a month. I have money but not time.  Reading through PAR and Graham's list of requirements for a boat trailer, I don't think I could even modify one to be right for a light sailboat.  Trailex for me.  

 

I saw a trailer modification project on Duckworks or some other forum.  I think the guy started out with the HF trailer and put a few hundred extra bucks into modifying it. I'll see if I can find it later. 

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Hey Chick--what are you using for an extender? I hunted but with no luck. Perhaps I just don't know the search terms. 

 

The trailer I have is a little over 19 feet length over all. Below is a pic of Alan's boat at B&B. In Washington State we can't have that much overhang. If I stay to 3 feet of overhang to the transom (I usually take the rudder off for transport), then I need 14 feet to the winch stand and I 'd like to have 18-24 inches beyond that so about 16 feet overall seems like a good minimum for me. Seems like most of the PWC trailers are 12 or so?

20140807_160559.jpg

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A tongue extension is little more than a length of square tube welded to the existing tongue. At least this is the case for most of the small boats here. On larger craft you'll need to weld some "cheeks" to the extension or use more square tube, commonly placed under the joint to increase weld area and stiffness at the joint.

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I'm having trouble finding where i bought my extender, too. I found it some how before. It was similar to the Yakima that I posted a few days ago, but galvanized and without the wiring extension. Also cheaper. I can find tongue tubing, but it doesn't have the splice joint (insert). It came from a manufacturer of canoe and kayak trailers and sold as an accessory.

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There are a couple of "extension" types. One is as I mentioned, a piece of 2" square tube (or whatever size your tongue tube is) welded to the cut and respaced tongue and the second is a retractable/extendable tongue. The extendable one is more difficult to "engineer" but most don't need this as much as the additional length. Ideally it's good to be galvanized, but the welding process will ruin some of these, so you need to paint it. Grind and paint normally and you can even use the "cold galvanizing" style of paints available, which is a rough match for the rest of the trailer. Wiring can be lengthened as needed and you can also just bolt the new longer tongue in place, instead of welding. When I do this I just remove the existing tongue and make a longer one from the same size tube, fastening it down the same way as the shorter original.

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Yes, that's the one I posted, but not the one I ordered back in 2004. I'm still trying to find where I got it from.  I found it some how before. It was similar to the Yakima that I posted a few days ago, but galvanized and without the wiring extension. Also cheaper. I can find tongue tubing, but it doesn't have the splice joint (insert). It came from a manufacturer of canoe and kayak trailers and sold as an accessory.

 

It just slips in place and is bolted. No welding.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

A shout out to the great folks at Metal Supermarkets. I went in to see about getting the aluminum strips for the keel and they were very helpful. And I only had to go to Everett instead of Seattle for Online Metals. As a bonus, he's able to sheer off some 5052 from a sheet in lieu of bar stock (which is pretty readily available in 6061) and phoned a couple of metal artisans in his network to see about fabricating the stem. They passed on their approach which I think is going to work. 

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