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Kennneee

Kickers, paint, etc.

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Hi All,

I am not buildng a Bluejacket but an Outer Banks 26. This is the first build of this design and therefore not nearly as much information available on this specific boat as there is from the Bluejacket community. I hope you all can help an "interlopper" on this site since there is so much collective wisdom that you Bluejacket folks have developed. The Outer Banks, while certainly a differnent design, has a lot of the same attributes as the Bluejacket. I come from a sailing and paddle racing background and am on a steep learning curve when it comes to powerboats. So, any help I can get will be greatly appreciated.

My first question is in regards to kicker motors. In looking at some of the Bluejacket builders blogs, etc. I don't see any kicker motors being used. I have always had a back up source of propulsion, either sail or paddle, on my boats. Have outboards become so reliable that a kicker is not important? Would love any thoughts you are willing to share.

I have the planking complete in my OB and will be purchasing bottom and topside paint soon. This boat will be on a trailer for a lot of time with some periods at a mooring for months at a time. Any input on bottom paint would be helpful.

Input on topside paint systems would also be helpful. I will likely go with a brushable 2 part LP. Might spray it but probably rolland tip. Recommendations?

Again, thanks in advance for letting an "outsider" share in your wisdom!

Cheers,

Ken

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There are no outsiders here, welcome aboard.

 

The quality and cost of LPU's will force you to consider at least roll and tip or spraying.

 

A kicker is a throwback to my childhood, when having an outboard on your boat simply meant, you were "outboard on your boat, wishing it would start". Everyone carried a small get you home kicker, because reliability was questionable. Modern, reasonably cared for outboards are far superior beasts and though some of us oldtimers still like the idea of a kicker, you just don't need them anymore. So, if you're a reasonable person, use fresh, clean fuel and generally take care of the smoke belching monster, you'll be fine. On the other hand if you're notorious for letting carbs foul up and don't change impellers, until they spit little hunks of rubber out the prop, well maybe the kicker is a good investment.

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PAR,

I guess I made it into the realm of the old timer. Belt and braces.... Is there a particular bottom paint you like for this application. I ran a boat yard almost 30 years ago. My guess is my choices of bottom paint from that time might be a bit out of date!

Ken

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Bottom paints are now pretty specialized, that the best advice is to ask the local professionals what they use. The fishermen and local marinas will know what works best in your area, much like you used to when you were in the swing of it. It's the same smell Ken, just different flies . . .

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I used Pettit Hydrocoat for bottom paint.  It should be able to withstand long periods out of the water.  Don't know about the actual antifouling performance.  It does depend on the type of water you are in.  I keep my boat on a lift.

Don't ask me about the topside paint.  It was a nightmare for me.  After the first a failed attempt with Rustoleum Marine paint I ended up rolling and tipping Interlux Brightsides on the hull.  As for the kicker, one fellow Bluejacket owner is planning on mounting a movable outboard bracket on the transom for a kicker or dinghy outboard.  Henry needs to put up some pictures.

Your boat starts to look good.  The upside down part wasn't much fun for me.

 

Egbert

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Your boat looks good in the raw.  As far as your topcoat paints, well that really depends on how fair and smooth your surface ends up being. Your surely don't want two part high gloss paints on a surface that's not been rubbed and finessed several times after a lot of priming.  As it pertains to bottom paint, well I like the Interlux Ultra, a hard bottom paint. This works great for a trailer or lift stored boat. And under normal conditions I get a couple years from the stuff. Use Interprotect 2000 under your bottom paint. This helps fair it too, but be warned that the stuff is super hard to sand when left a week or more. So get the surface mostly smooth before applying. And the Interprotect has a extended working time for over coating in months without sanding.

 

And fair your hull sides as much as you can before your flip your hull.  Its much easier that way.

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Choosing an outboard brand can depend on what is being sold and serviced in your region, or the region that you plan to use the boat most of the time.  If I was to be building that boat I would look at the 90 hp. Suzuki at the least. They are quiet and smooth and efficient at the mid ranges by comparison to the well known Yamaha. I have a 90 Yamaha four stroke and have owned the 90 Suzuki and will say that the Suzuki had a lot more low end gusto to me than the 90 has for a similar weighted boat. The gear case on the Suzuki is 2.42 while the Yamaha is now rated at 2.27.

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 I like the more simple approach and low maintenance of the ETEC 75.  For me it was local dealer ship and the price. The major dislike is the vibration around idle speeds.  I'm changing the motor mounting in the hope to absorb some vibration.  This vibration manifest itself in my rattling side windows.

Two Bluejacket owners with a Yamaha 90 both hit something underwater and it destroyed the lower unit gears on both of them.  Sofar I just hit some Chesapeake Bay mud.

 

Egbert

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We haven't used the boat a whole lot yet to get accurate data.  According to the gps we got about 3.5 mpg going around 15 mph.  Top is almost 24 mph.  At 4000 lbs my boat is fairly heavy for a Bluejacket.  I don't know what made it that heavy. I did use quite a bit of oak in the interior, a water heater, golf cart batteries etc  Those don't contribute to a lean boat.  I am happy with performance of the motor.  It doesn't feel sluggish or strained.

We are planning a week cruise beginning of March, I hope to get some better numbers then.

 

Egbert

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I have not been here for a while, sorry I am late to the party.

I am running a 2008 Honda 90 VTEC on my Bluejacket 271 .I purchased it used from a Honda Marine dealer, with 1000 hours the motor has performed flawlessly so far. My cost for the motor controls and the rigging that I did myself was less than 50% of a new one  Observations after two seasons and a couple of hundred hours.

Top Speed @ 6000RPM = 28MPH

Cruising speed 18 - 20 MPH @4000RPM +/-

Fuel economy 3 -4 MPG

Weight of Boat, Motor, full fuel and water = 3600#

The 90 is probably too much, but it is awfully nice to have the extra umph when navigating around the massive bleach bottles that throw up a tidal wave bow and stern when making way.

 

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5 hours ago, Oyster said:

Do you know your prop size on the 90?  TIA

I will need to look at it to be sure.   I had a couple of props on the oat not sure whats on it now.

 

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Thanks, I have a 100 V-Tec that I plan on using, unless I sell it. And with that and your finished rigged weight, this may give me something to start with. I now have two wheels, one is a 13.25 x 17 and one that's on it now and on a smaller skiff with a 13.50 x 15. Its under wheeled and turns up too much. But it may work out with the larger boat.

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Thanks for that report back.  Honda does not have a good selection of wheels. And with these hulls that normally weight less than like sizes in the production market, its hard to get them wheeled correctly these days.

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