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Alan Stewart

Taylor and Alan's CS-20 MK3 #15

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This info about keeping things nice an straight is real good. I had to scarf about a 3/4" piece on to my cabin top because I didn't angle everything just right and the stock top was just a little small.  I've looked "Skeena" over every which way and I can't see anything that bulges or is concave, but my OCD knows that little scarf is there and it bugs me.

 

I can't tell you how jealous I am that Taylor is in the trenches helping you out. I showed my wife and she was impressed too but didn't volunteer to help on the next boat. I'm trying to talk her into coming to the messabout........maybe Taylor can tell her how much fun she missed over dinner :^)

 

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After helping getting the B&B shop ready for the hurricane last week and then being spared any damage at our house in Newbern and only losing power for 8 hours I took advantage of my time off to work on the boat. Taylor was busy preparing for going back to school and i wont have her help as much now summer break is over. 

 

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Great Video. I seemed to have blocked many parts of the build out of my mind. Some could have stayed blocked!:blink:   I remember doing these. I wasn't as confident with a grinder and used a Shinto Rasp to work that outer bevel. That is how I explain 4 and a half years.......really.

 

If you are sailing at the Messabout that will be amazing.

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7 hours ago, Mark Baumgaertner said:

How many people does it take to flip your CS20 MK3, I'm almost ready to flip mine too.

 

 

Hmm, sounds like a trick question.

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Well, it IS easy if you do the prep. Also, we are impatient so i was determined to get it done this weekend but it would have been easier to break it into 3 days like doing the center section last after the sides. That was a bit tricky. I didnt video much of the 3 hours of sanding the hull with a 24" long sanding board to make sure it was as fair as it could be before starting also rounding the chines which is covered in the CS15 videos. I put as big a radius as i could on the chines. I planed down the side panel tabs then used the flush trim router to remove the botttom panel tabs but be careful as the angle changes along the length so you have to adjust the router tilt base angle for each tab. Then I used a power plane to put the chamfer (about 5/8" wide) on the chines then knocked  the chamfer edges off with a plane and finally rounded smooth with the board sander (torture board) by hand with 80 grit. Stem was rounded to about a 5/8" diameter for 1/2" ss hollowback. Ill video the fairing process a bit better. Last night i went back and brushed a coat of my fairing filler mix on the corners (chines, stem, transom edges) and i added some more filler in some of the spots that got a bit of a light coat. Here is what the chines look like. Ill probably start sanding on it tuesday.

 

The chines with an extra coat of the runny microspheres filler brushed on. I estimate that i added a full gallon of epoxy mixed with microspheres to fill the glass weave. 

20190930_075556.thumb.jpg.e0abd53442451e8d99a625cc7286dbc4.jpg

 

and the keel

20190930_075646.thumb.jpg.cfa4698bdb9f521f159ad0dbe5487b0b.jpg

 

And most of the surface

20190930_075730.thumb.jpg.99409f744a430c603e83d981d5ea9f34.jpg

 

I've also decided (well almost decided) to do the wood keel strip. I was thinking i wouldnt just to be different and maybe gain a bit of performance both in weight savings and drag but i think i want the stainless strip on the keel and an external strip is the easiest way to do that. Only other way i can think of would be to use t-nuts and glass over them on the inside because of the ballast tank. 

 

Oh,  and ill probably throw a piece of glass on the transom afterall.

 

My sanding board. 2 pieces of half sheet 3m spray adhesive to 6mm plywood with two blocks hot glued for handles. 

20190930_080639.thumb.jpg.9ff676a8c1962cf8884989335a6b9d07.jpg

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I'm a lazy old codger and use power whenever possible. I roughly plane the chine with my power plane to the angles like you did. Then I use an air file in those pesky chines. Hold it in line with the chine and rotate it up and down and back and forth along the chine. It does take a larger compressor to run this puppy, though.
https://www.amazon.com/Ingersoll-315-Piston-Straight-Sander/dp/B00004XOT5/ref=sr_1_2?crid=1IQ76L63GVQYD&keywords=air+file+sander&qid=1569930460&sprefix=air+file%2Caps%2C155&sr=8-2

 

I usually glass the hull in 5 sections. Bottom, sides, and transom. This gives a double layer over all of the corners. I like to do the bottom first, let it cure, then fair the edges along the chines and transom.. Then do he sides. For me, this makes it easier to avoid ridges where the glass overlaps.

You DO make it all look so easy!

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Thanks Chick, i've never used an air sander like that but would like to try one. 

 

This question was asked on the youtube comments so I thought i'd repost it here re the fairing filler mix we used. 

Quote

 

Question:

Was there any filler in the epoxy that you laid down on the bare wood of the bottom before you rolled the glass back on top?  Also, what’s the consistency of the second fill coat, after you wet out the glass, with the microballoons?  It looked like Elmer’s glue.
1 day ago


Answer:

The plywood was just coated with neat epoxy with no additive. Just to soak into the wood. It makes wetting out the glass go a lot faster I think. I use a squeege/putty knife for this because a roller picks up the filler you just put down in the chine cracks and pinholes. The fill coat was about elmers glue constancy that is a good comparison. It was 16 pumps of epoxy (from our sticky stuff dispenser) which I think is about 14oz plus 3 small applesauce cupfuls of microSPHERES (not micro-balloons).

 

 

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Alan. Question. You stated, "... cupfuls of microSPHERES (not micro-balloons)". Microspheres are solid and microballoons are hollow? Which is Q-cell? As far as I know, it's microballoons. What is a brand name for microspheres? Cabosil is different from both of these. It's "fumed silica". I've used Q-cell for a fairing putty. It sands really fast, but sags if put on too thick. I've mixed various ratios of Cabosil and Q-cell to prevent sagging. I have Q-cell, which is a trade name, and also some labeled "Microballoons". The Q-cell is white, and the micro-balloons are tan colored. I believe that the micro-balloons are phenolic material, but what is the Q-cell made of? Boy, I sure can make a simple subject complicated!

I just Googled Microspheres and microballoons. Seems that to most folks they are the same. Now THAT really confuses the issue. Dang! Here is a better description from Wikipedia. It basically says that microBALLOONS are a hollow form of microSPHERES.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_microsphere

 

Microballoons are easier to sand, but weaker as a putty than microsheres. Cabosil is much stronger, but hard to sand. Then we just go and confuse everything by adding wood flour. Sorry, y'all, I'll shut up about this subject now. Alan, you can just straighten it all out for us! (Insert smiley face here.)

 

I don't pre-coat plywood before laying the glass, and ya gotta work back and forth to wet the glass because the wood soaks up the poxy. Pre-coating is good. Lay the glass right on top of the wet poxy either when it's soaked in a bit, but still wet, or when it starts to tack up a bit. Do NOT let it fully cure or you'll need to sand before glassing.

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There is nothing wrong with creating a small glass skeg using several layers of biaxall glass. You don't need to go too high and still have some protection to the hull and something for rollers to rest on when in a trailer. Of course if you wish for weight savings, use high density foam or cossa board and then glass it, even doing several layers of the biaxall on top. Then personally that's the sacrificial layer for repeated beaching. I have used this method for years and then use multiple layers of Interprotect 2000. You can remove the topcoat paint and still have protection. That's some tough stuff.

 

On these types of builds I am not a big fan of a full of running metal skegs where fasteners are used. Over time the screws will also find a way of creating a small channel for water to creep in any wooden skegs, even with the best of beddings. .10 worth anyway. And Microlight when mixed correctly is a piece of cake to sand. Then apply a good quality primer, which seals up the really porous surface created by the tiny beads with marginal amounts of resin that's required for that brand.  The microballons is denser though, but harder to sand. And Awlgrip awlfair  1 to 1 is wonderful even at its cost.

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