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Outer Banks 26 #1

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14 hours ago, DaveH said:



Thank you for sharing your engine rigging experience.  I have presumed that I would be making a two hour round trip trek transporting my Bluejacket 25.5 to the dealer for their marks for the bolt holes, returning home to drill oversized  holes and filling them in.  Next,  I return to the dealer for their hole drilling and engine mounting.  I had thought I was alone in going to this degree of effort to preclude engine bolts through raw plywood.




You asked me about my thinking on outboard engines.  First, I must impeach my qualifications on outboard engine experience.  For over 45 years, I continue to be a sailboat owner thus my marine engine expertise is primary related to Diesel engines.  


How did I decide on a Yamaha F70?


1.  Weight.    The F70 without a propeller, crankcase and gear case oil weighs 253 pounds.  When first introduced about six years ago it was lighter than most two cycle engines of similar horsepower.  A Yamaha F75/F90 weighs 353 lbs.  I suspect that the additional weight features a more robust lower unit as well as a displacement of 1832 cc versus 996cc  for the F70.  


Once upon a time I had a 22' sailboat that swayed when towed with a 6hp on the transom.  Putting the engine down below forward of the single axle,  the boat towed so much better.   I was towing with a Nash Rambler, had no understanding of tongue weight requirements,  and probably had the tires improperly inflated.  I choose  to ignore these factors, and since I'm old and tired, I reserve the right to remain pig headed in my belief that keeping outboard engine weight down makes for safer  towing.  


2.  Availability of repair personnel.  I have no empirical data to support my contention/bias  that Yamaha help locations are more prevalent than any other manufacturer.  I have a Yamaha repair facility one hour from my front door.  


3.. Known performance.  A sister ship to my Bluejacket has a Yamaha F70 and reports 2.5 gallons per hour fuel burn at 16 knots.  The owner reports a top end of about 23 knots.  My boating career has been at 6 knots day after day under sail with the sole speed  adventure occurring on my sailboat when we hit 12 knots over the bottom while surfing on Delaware Bay in the fringe of a tropical storm.  So, cruising at 16 knots for me is warp speed.


 Will I get into a weather situation that more horsepower is needed  to save me?  I don't have the experience to answer that question.  


4. Reliability.  I have been persuaded by boating forums that contemporary outboard engines are all very good thus you can't go wrong with any manufacturer. The three folks I know with midsize Yamahas report that nothing has failed.  




The F70 alternator puts out 17A  at W.O.T.  Based on Honda 60 marketing literature, it appears that 5A are required to run the Honda.   Assuming  this to be the case for the F70, it appears that my engine will have only 12 amps available to recharge two 6v deep cycle batteries. Not sure if there will be enough engine hours in the day for my engine to recharge these batteries from the 50% depletion level.   In contrast, the Yamaha F75 has a 35A alternator.  Will your boat be primarily a long distance cruiser swinging on the hook or like mine a day tripper or marina hopper on longer voyages.  How much electrical/electronic stuff you going to have?  I'm tied of fixing stuff thus my Bluejacket current drawing equipment  will be sparse.  Your thirst for electrical stuff and life style may make alternator capacity a crucial decision factor in engine selection.  


I'm clueless about propeller pitch and sizing.  I will copy what my boat's sistership uses.  I'm told that a stainless steel prop gives better performance than an aluminum one because the steel blades won't distort under load.  I'm told that a steel prop will manage  a strike by only bending and transferring damaging shock to the lower unit while an aluminum prop strike  will snap off a blade thus acting as a fuse to minimize damage to the lower unit.   Until convinced otherwise, I'm using an aluminum prop.  


So there you have my thoughts on outboard engine selection.  I'm a neophyte on the subject thus my thinking and command of the facts may be screwed up. Suggest you consult those with much real life  experience with mid-sized outboards.  


 Egbert Dees has an ETEC 75 on his Bluejacket 25.5 thus can provide feedback for you.  


This is fun stuff! 








Great reply. later on I will address some of the details pertaining to the engines that you describe.  I actually went a different direction, larger engine even though the weight was more. Of course I highly modified the original 22 plans to the point that  mild  scorn was heaped upon me. And I made a few more mistakes that also created a slightly different bottom.


So please forgive me of my sins when my direction and requirements are not really the same. But the proper  power is really important as you go with a larger hull as with the 26. People start out with an ideal setup only to find themselves loading their boats to the point that even fuel burn is increased right along with the speed decreasing.

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Hi Guys- I am about to head off for a road/surfski paddle trip to California for a few weeks.  All work and no play.... I am already thinking of what I want to get done on Rosie when I return.  Will undoubtedly come back with a van load of gear and materials.  I completed the forward cabin top and got it glassed yesterday. Been mortising butt hinges and fine tuning the cabinet harware in the pilothouse, etc.  











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