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Kennneee

Outer Banks 26 #1

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Ken,

 

First you inspire us, then you scare the heck out of us and now you're inspiring us again.  So glad you're doing better.  Where would we be without those women watching after us?  Take care and take it easy, but don't quit.

 

Carter

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Carter,

Thanks for the encouragement!! I am far to stubborn to quit. Happy New Year.

Ken (aka Lazarus)

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Hi Steve- Thanks for asking!  So far, so good.  According to the docs I am way ahead of their expectations.  Up here in Canuckistan they take your driving “privileges” away for 6 months after a cardiac arrest.  The docs decided I was ok to drive after 1 month which I took to be a good sign. I am back on the water kayaking but not training for any of the Winter or Spring races.  The docs have me on some magic potions (pills) that are supposed help my recovery and keep me alive.  They make me tired so my time in the shop has been cut back but I am still plugging away most

days. Fewer hours for sure. The interior is coming together slowly.

Luanne is always nice to me.  More than I deserve. Since the “event” she is even nicer.  Yep, watching her stack the firewood today made me feel a bit guilty.  She didn’t know I was up in the shop resorting my lumber at the same time.  Let’s hope she doesn’t loose her mind and decide to start reading this forum:).

Anyway, given the choice I would avoid a heart attack but one great benefit is getting great calls, cards and visits from friends .  Always knew I was a lucky guy but the past few months have really driven that home.

I will try to get some pics together of progress on ROSIE in the near future.

Cheers,

Ken

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Hi All-Finally got off my butt to take some pics of ROSIE.  I have most of the cockpit seating and storage complete.  The interior cabinetry is mostly complete.  I am waiting for some material to arrive so I can spray the cabinet and drawer faces.  Hope to have them complete this week.  The interior painting has begun.

I cut the window and port openings in the pilot house sides a couple of days ago.  I love the new open look and how it makes the lovely profile stand out.  It is the small details that add up to a pleasing look.  Graham’s artistry really shines with little things like small changes in the oval port size in the forward cabin.  They get slightly larger as you look aft. Something that might  not be obvious but makes a subtle difference.

The galley is coming along nicely.  I bit the bullet and splurged for a WALLAS diesel/kerosene stove that doubles as a cabin heater. The countertop is plywood that has been coated with a very cool product from DAICH COATINGS.  It has stone imbeded in the 3 part system and makes a really nice counter. Thanks to Henry Hassel, one of the BLUEJACKET builders for that recommendation.

I plan to build the cuddy cabin roof soon and begin final exterior paint and deck coating.  Unfortunately the pilot house sides and aft bulkhead will have to be removed to extricate ROSIE from the shop. Now only 9,090 details left!

Ken

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That is really nice.  If I ever switch to power, that's one of my likelies.  Especially seeing the work you've done.

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Ken,

 

Delighted to see your recent picture posting which tells me your back on the job making great progress.  Much fun to see your cabinet work.  

 

Last Friday I ordered a Yamaha F70 which should be available in about two weeks,  thus I'm removing tarps etc. from my three year old aluminum trailer that has been stored in my backyard patiently ignoring my annual lies that she will be soon put in use.

 

Yamaha  is running a promotion through the end of this March which gives me a no cost warranty extension from three years to five.  To have warranty coverage, a certified Yamaha technician $$$$ must "rig" the engine.  I'm still negotiating with the dealer to determine what is the minimum rigging they will do and still  register my warranty with Yamaha.

 

 I believe I'm afflicted  with the boat builder mindset of not wanting anyone else to work on my boat and secondly,  if I can build the boat I have the competency to mount an outboard engine.  I need to calm down and characterize the mandatory rigging expense as the price of admission.

 

Regards,

 

Dave 

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Dave,

 

We have been able to talk the dealer into letting us have the engine with the promise that we will return the rig to him to look over the installation and check everything out and he gets to do the first start after making sure that everything is up to his satisfaction. If they say "what if you do not do it right" I say that they then get to fix whatever I do wrong and charge me for it. 

There is no reason why you cannot bolt the engine to the transom, run the harness and wiring, mount the gauges, set up the steering and run the fuel lines. I like to over drill the mounting bolt holes and resin bush them and add some extra glass on both sides of the busing to keep the water out of the transom. Dealers do not have the time to do that properly.

 

They are in the business to sell motors and maybe Evenrude and Suzuki are hungrier.

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Hi Guys- Thanks for the kudos. I am starting to see the finish line in sight but it is still a ways off.  I love seeing the details coming together.  I started installing the cuddy cabin top this week and am ready to install a lot of the "furniture" that was spayed with finish in the last few days.  I would never admit to standing at the helm and imagining ROSIE cruising along on the way to Alaska.  Nope wouldn't ever admit to that!

Funny that you mentioned your motor Dave.  I have been shopping for a motor as well but still haven't pulled the trigger yet.  I will likely go with a 90hp.  Any advice or comments on motors would be greatly appreciated.  The local dealer would prefer that I install it myself if I buy it from him.   As Graham mentioned he would give it a final check before the first start up.  I think he would rather have fussy builders drilling holes in their work.  I recently went to a boat show in Vancouver and was offered a great deal on an ETECH 90 with a 10 year warranty.  There is no dealer that sells and services Evinrude locally so I am reluctant to go with that option.  That leaves Suzuki and Yamaha.  I am sure either would be a good choice.  Yamaha has come out with a new 90 and a SHO or SUPER HIGH OUTPUT version which sounds pretty good. Again, I don't have much knowledge on these motors so any thoughts would be helpful.

Dave, get that beauty launched.  It is a piece of art that needs to get wet!  

Cheers,

Ken

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Graham,

 

Thank  you for the encouragement on what might be possible in regards to reducing the cost of getting my outboard rigged.  So far,  the service dept at the dealership seems agreeable to:. No gauges need to be installed, I'll hook up the steering and I'll  install  the remote control handle for the throttle/shift.  They wanted $490 for the remote control handle assembly.  I have one on order for $220 off the internet.  

 

The service manager acted like this was the first time he heard it when I said the proper way to mount an engine on a plywood transom is to drill oversized holes, fill them with epoxy and fiberglass filaments, and then drill the correct size mounting holes through "plastic" and not wood.  A worker overheard the conversation and chimed in "Yup, that's the right way to put bolt holes though a plywood transom to prevent rot".  

 

I will do the epoxy hole work.  

 

Regards,

 

Dave

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dave. That's exactly what i did with my Marissa. I picked up the wiring harnes and the network bits along with my steering hoses and fuel line throttle and gearshift cables ETC from the dealer and rigged them before the deck went in. then when it came time to drill holes i took it to them we made marks on the transom where it needed to be drilled then i took it home drill and glassed ETC and took it back for the final rigging. Worked out quite well i think although was a bit of a hassel. 

 

Hope this helps :)

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Riggs,

 

Thank you for sharing your engine rigging experience.  I have presumed that I would be making a two hour round trip trek transporting my Bluejacket 25.5 to the dealer for their marks for the bolt holes, returning home to drill oversized  holes and filling them in.  Next,  I return to the dealer for their hole drilling and engine mounting.  I had thought I was alone in going to this degree of effort to preclude engine bolts through raw plywood.

 

Ken,

 

You asked me about my thinking on outboard engines.  First, I must impeach my qualifications on outboard engine experience.  For over 45 years, I continue to be a sailboat owner thus my marine engine expertise is primary related to Diesel engines.  

 

How did I decide on a Yamaha F70?

 

1.  Weight.    The F70 without a propeller, crankcase and gear case oil weighs 253 pounds.  When first introduced about six years ago it was lighter than most two cycle engines of similar horsepower.  A Yamaha F75/F90 weighs 353 lbs.  I suspect that the additional weight features a more robust lower unit as well as a displacement of 1832 cc versus 996cc  for the F70.  

 

Once upon a time I had a 22' sailboat that swayed when towed with a 6hp on the transom.  Putting the engine down below forward of the single axle,  the boat towed so much better.   I was towing with a Nash Rambler, had no understanding of tongue weight requirements,  and probably had the tires improperly inflated.  I choose  to ignore these factors, and since I'm old and tired, I reserve the right to remain pig headed in my belief that keeping outboard engine weight down makes for safer  towing.  

 

2.  Availability of repair personnel.  I have no empirical data to support my contention/bias  that Yamaha help locations are more prevalent than any other manufacturer.  I have a Yamaha repair facility one hour from my front door.  

 

3.. Known performance.  A sister ship to my Bluejacket has a Yamaha F70 and reports 2.5 gallons per hour fuel burn at 16 knots.  The owner reports a top end of about 23 knots.  My boating career has been at 6 knots day after day under sail with the sole speed  adventure occurring on my sailboat when we hit 12 knots over the bottom while surfing on Delaware Bay in the fringe of a tropical storm.  So, cruising at 16 knots for me is warp speed.

 

 Will I get into a weather situation that more horsepower is needed  to save me?  I don't have the experience to answer that question.  

 

4. Reliability.  I have been persuaded by boating forums that contemporary outboard engines are all very good thus you can't go wrong with any manufacturer. The three folks I know with midsize Yamahas report that nothing has failed.  

 

Miscellaneous:

 

The F70 alternator puts out 17A  at W.O.T.  Based on Honda 60 marketing literature, it appears that 5A are required to run the Honda.   Assuming  this to be the case for the F70, it appears that my engine will have only 12 amps available to recharge two 6v deep cycle batteries. Not sure if there will be enough engine hours in the day for my engine to recharge these batteries from the 50% depletion level.   In contrast, the Yamaha F75 has a 35A alternator.  Will your boat be primarily a long distance cruiser swinging on the hook or like mine a day tripper or marina hopper on longer voyages.  How much electrical/electronic stuff you going to have?  I'm tied of fixing stuff thus my Bluejacket current drawing equipment  will be sparse.  Your thirst for electrical stuff and life style may make alternator capacity a crucial decision factor in engine selection.  

 

I'm clueless about propeller pitch and sizing.  I will copy what my boat's sistership uses.  I'm told that a stainless steel prop gives better performance than an aluminum one because the steel blades won't distort under load.  I'm told that a steel prop will manage  a strike by only bending and transferring damaging shock to the lower unit while an aluminum prop strike  will snap off a blade thus acting as a fuse to minimize damage to the lower unit.   Until convinced otherwise, I'm using an aluminum prop.  

 

So there you have my thoughts on outboard engine selection.  I'm a neophyte on the subject thus my thinking and command of the facts may be screwed up. Suggest you consult those with much real life  experience with mid-sized outboards.  

 

 Egbert Dees has an ETEC 75 on his Bluejacket 25.5 thus can provide feedback for you.  

 

This is fun stuff! 

 

Dave 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi Dave- Thanks for the thoughtful response.  I am relatively new to power boats as well.  I spent 7 years living and travelling on a steel sailboat that I built.  At that time 6 knots was screaming along.  FAST forward and I am building a powerboat and like you think speeds in the teens is flying.  My intention to hang a 90hp off ROSIE's transom is based on the design recommendation.  The OB26 has a bit higher displacement than the Bluejacket 25.5 and not far from the Bluejacket 28.  Since ROSIE is the first of this design I don't have sister ships to compare her to in terms of performance.  I would rather err on the high side and not kick myself later if I go with a motor that is undersized for this boat.  I have been led to believe that fuel consumption would not be radically different going with a larger motor and not pushing it as hard. As far as weight goes Graham has given the thumbs up on the weight of a 90 hp.  I guess we will find out when I get her wet.

I have always been pretty bare bones when cruising.  Never had refrigeration, hot water heaters, etc.  I will likely join the modern age and get some decent electronics for navigation but don't expect to have a huge current demand. As a matter of fact I just happened upon my old Tamaya sextant and plan to sell it.  Not sure if it has any value these days for anything more than a paperweight:)   I am not planning to head over the horizon and sail the ends of the earth at this point.  Rosie will likely be used for shorter trips with a longer trip occasionally.  I have to keep reminding myself as I build the interior that I don't need liveaboard and bluewater storage. I think ROSIE has more storage then my 32' sailboat had. Ahhh, the luxury of a powerboat...

I also have to start shopping for a trailer.  I don't expect to use a trailer for much more than storage and a few miles a year to launch here on Salt Spring. That is a whole other bit of "research" to figure out what to get. She will likely hang on a mooring during the Summer and shoulder seasons.  Again, thanks for the feedback and keep us all posted on your march towards launch. 

Cheers,

Ken

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