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Kennneee

Outer Banks 26 #1

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Steve- The Festool stuff is really pricey but saves lots of time.  Dominos are WAY stronger than biscuits.  I have used them in lots of applications and never a failure.  Check out the chairs in the link below.  For years I did complicated and time consuming chair joinery and made these with dominos.  They seem bulletproof. The time saving on this set was worth thenprice of the machine.

https://goo.gl/photos/WgFq3WJjAQjQLLiPA

cheers,

Ken

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Ken,

 

After constructing a plywood cabinet with some decorative trim, I bask in my glory of being a self proclaimed accomplished woodworker.  After viewing your furniture project pictures, I return to the reality that there's the woodworker varsity and junior varsity.  You sir are a letterman on the varsity.  I'm a struggling freshman on the junior varsity.

 

What I most admire about woodworkers such as you and Tom Lathrop is that you understand the properties of wood and how to make the wood go where you want it to go and be happy staying  there.  To this, add in artistic creativity and you all inspire woodworkers like me to strive harder.  Thank you!

 

No doubt the interior of your boat will be magnificent in design and finish.  I wish you were way ahead of my build so I could have stolen your expected clever design and fabrication techniques. 

 

On the junior varsity we still use biscuit cutters.  I have yet to replace the broken springs on mine so I have to manually retract  the cutting blade.  A penny saved is a finger cut off.  

 

When the Dow Jones hits 25,000 I'll start shopping for a Festool domino cutter.  

 

Cheers! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dave- Thanks for the kudos.  Funny you should say all that since I periodically look at your Blujacket build and have moments of near panic looking at all of your thoughtful and amazing detailing.  I think we all have a lot to learn from each other and that is the beauty of this community.

I thought of calling you the other day to get some advice on a few of your details.  I am away from home for a few days trying to think about somthing other than my OB26.  BUSTED! What am I doing on this site??

Cheers,

Ken

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Ken and others,

 

For years I have been following this boat building thread depicting construction of a 27' wooden express. .  http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-boat-show-photos/268706-building-27-custom-express.html

 

The builder is a Coast Guard Chief Petty officer who is in the aviation community.   He may be retired now from the CG.  His tread has the geatest number of followers of any boatbuilding thread I'm familiar with.  His understanding of materials and obsessive need to build the "right way" are in my mind legendary.  

 

The technical wisdom and debates provided by his thread followers has been of immense benefit for heading me in the right direction for sources of supply and understanding the properties of materials in a marine environment especially saltwater.  

 

The thread is now up to  285 pages and the builder's boat has been launched.  

 

Like all internet sourced information, the boat builder's thread has its share of people getting nasty over stupid stuff but the highly opinionated builder does a good job of staying above most of the frays and keeping people on point.  

 

This is must reading for neophytes like me when I started my boat build seven years ago. Unfortunately, I didn't discover the tread until about three  years ago.  

 

Regards,

Dave 

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On ‎7‎/‎21‎/‎2017 at 3:05 PM, DaveH said:

 

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Ken and others,

 

For years I have been following this boat building thread depicting construction of a 27' wooden express. .  http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-boat-show-photos/268706-building-27-custom-express.html

 

The builder is a Coast Guard Chief Petty officer who is in the aviation community.   He may be retired now from the CG.  His tread has the geatest number of followers of any boatbuilding thread I'm familiar with.  His understanding of materials and obsessive need to build the "right way" are in my mind legendary.  

 

The technical wisdom and debates provided by his thread followers has been of immense benefit for heading me in the right direction for sources of supply and understanding the properties of materials in a marine environment especially saltwater.  

 

The thread is now up to  285 pages and the builder's boat has been launched.  

 

Like all internet sourced information, the boat builder's thread has its share of people getting nasty over stupid stuff but the highly opinionated builder does a good job of staying above most of the frays and keeping people on point.  

 

This is must reading for neophytes like me when I started my boat build seven years ago. Unfortunately, I didn't discover the tread until about three  years ago.  

 

Regards,

Dave 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can rest assure that the original design was a botched attempt  at a boat. You can also rest assure that if that designer and designer had a tiny bit of street crude that you would be seeing his boats being promoted across the net by proud homebuilders. Yet that is not the case.  The one start up builder that got drawn into the hype never did finish the larger hull because of all of the design flaws.  The smaller flats boats are no where to be seen on the waters either, after all of the issues of submarining when put on the water.

 

The saving grace right now in the area of performance is that the boat was loaded and weighed way aft, especially with an oversized  set of engines hanging off an unsupported bracket.  The teak alone that he added in the cockpit area coupled with enough framing as its substrate, also drawn in the plans created a boat that weighs hundreds if not a thousand of lbs. more than what is needed. We talked him out of a hard top too.

 

I can go on and on. But fortunately he was active duty while building and away from the project enough that he did have more than enough time to digest his build with the help of a half dozen others after some of the latent defects in the concept designs came to light.  His own quest for quality helped create one heck of a head turner for sure.

 

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I can't remember when I first read Mark's thread.  It has certainly helped me get an idea of what is involved with having the desire to build my own boat - the ups and downs.  A few things that stand out in my mind from that build thread is the value and skill of our Designer here and the upstanding professional builders that helped Mark out.

I find it interesting and helpful to read those builders insights and tips/tricks when they do post.

 

I think the fight club thread is well worth a read as well.

 

When I first read that Ken used dominos, all I could think about were these - hahaha

 

domino.jpg

 

Keep up the good work Ken

 

 

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Hi All,

It has been a long time since I sat down to share my progress on Rosie.  The decks are on, sheer line tweaked and foredeck faired to look correct, anchor well in place, some ceiling added in the forward cabin and tank coffin compete. I also added a strip of wood with a rolling bevel to the forward 16’ feet of the sheer.  This will make the Sapelle rub rail easier to bend in place since it is no longer needs to be twisted into shape.  The price we pay for a beautifully flared bow. There is floatation in the bilge areas which may have been a waste of time.  Hope never to find out. I will begin the interior framing very soon. Need to make some decisions on the layout. Things are moving along.

Ken

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Hi All,

Making a bit of progress on ROSIE these days.  Somehow managed to have a cardiac arrest a few weeks back which slowed me down a bit.  Pretty close to normal these days and spending time in the shop. 

I have the cockpit seating and pilot house “furniture” roughed in.  The fuel tank is installed and mostly plumbed. Love seeing the interior taking shape. 

Ken

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I am very lucky.  My wife did CPR for 19 minutes. The Docs told her I was probably a goner and if I survived I would be brain damaged.  Some of my friends think I had a head start on that:).  Anyway, a stent and I seem to be recovering at a surprisingly fast pace.  Doc gave me the go ahead to go back to kayak racing again. Scary indeed.

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Ken,

 

One  would think that a slender kayak racer like you would not be a candidate for a coronary event.  But then again, sixteen  years ago my 6' tall 145 lb then 53 year old younger brother James was participating in a bike race.  A tremendous athlete who could keep up with those 30 years younger and he appeared to live on a diet of sawdust and water.  During the race he had a heart attack, lost conscious, and crashed without serious injury.    He damaged his heart muscle thus has an implanted defibrillator and had to reduce the intensity of his bike riding.  Later, while riding his bike in the Rocky Mountains the defiberallor went off blowing him off his bike.   A small setback and today James is still riding.  Bad family genetics got him and my 64 year sister who died of a heart attack last May.  

 

Immediately,  after James' event, I had a nuclear stress  test which incuded a traditional treadmill test which showed no heart issues.  However, the scans of my heart revealed an area of the heart that appeared to be experiencing restricted blood flow even though I was experiencing no chest pains or any symptom suggesting a looming heart issue.  A heart catherization revealed an 80% blockage in a major artery.  A stent unplugged me and sixteen years later all appears well after a nuclear stress I had two months ago.  Thanks to my brother, I skipped the usual heart attack event that causes one to have a stent installed.  I'm sorry you and your wife had the trauma of a serious coronary event as notification of a heart blockage.  

 

You and I were unlucky to have a heart blockage.  You and I are very lucky to live in an era that offers a heart repair.  Reportedly,  Lyndon Johnson could have lived many years longer if stent technology was available to him.  

 

Three cheers for your gallant wife!  Is she enjoying the huge diamond you gave her for Christmas? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We all seem to awaken to the reality of genetics and assorted aliments, after we darn near bite the big one. Women seem much less prone to this social trait, but once you get into your mid 40's, take stock. The statistics just get worse, year after year. For example at your age, you odds of surviving a major cardiac event are about 50%. Once over 60 the odds drop to 30%, yeah, 2 out of 3, given no previous history. Once in the mid 60's the first sign you're about to die from a stroke is when you fall over, from a stroke and the odds aren't good. I'm fortunate I had my heart attack fairly early, pushing hard to finish up a restoration for a major show. I knew I was pushing it hard, but it wasn't anything I hadn't done previously. I'm just glad I recognized the symptoms soon enough and literally had the attack in the car on the way to the emergency room.

 

Take care of your butts guys, the odds are not good. When you see grey in your hair, you've waited to long. I've lost way too many, way too young and most could have been easily nursed through with regular checkups and age related testing. Glad both of you got lucky, but this isn't a retirement plan when 2 out of 3 will just grab their chest and fall over, as their first sign of trouble.

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Health is your most important thing. My late Father in law worked at GM for 40 years. He had union benefits which meant excellent health care. He didn't get a colonoscopy because it sounded inconvenient. He started having "problems" and when he finally couldn't go anymore he wound up in the hospital septic and lived another six weeks before the grapefruit sized tumor on his colon killed him. To see the look on his face at 72 knowing he just took his health for granted is something I will never forget. We all have problems and we don't know what will get us in the end, but having a physical, watching our weight, eating well and exercising have such a great ROI that you have to be cautious to keep vigilant.

 

I am sure glad to see you made it through something so scary. Your workmanship is a joy to see.

 

I often sign my name with "Take Care" preceding it. Seems appropriate hearing all these stories! 

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Hi Guys- Thanks for all of the input.  Hereditary is a hard one to overcome.  I have worked pretty hard most of my adult life to stay heathy and fit.  Up until this event it seemed that it worked.    I was not feeling great a few weeks before the event and had to drop out of a race which I never did before.  I was given a stress test, ECG and the resuts were that I was healthier than most guys 20 years younger. We never know what life has cooked up for us until we look in the rear view mirror. The Docs and EMT’s said that my chances of survival were around 6%!  My wife is a hero!  She was nominated for a VITAL LINK award for saving a life in an unlikely circumstance.  Good thing she doesn’t like diamonds!  Being an American and moving to Canada some years back I can’t say enough about the care I received here.  They sent a helicopter to take me to the best cardiac center (fog kept them from being able to transport me).  They then held up the local ferry and had 2 different ambulances involved in getting me to the hospital.  The state of the art care was off the charts good. Workd class and cutting edge.  We pay around $100/month for our medical insurance which covers both of us. They actually LOWERED the permiums this year!  Never filled out a piece of paper, no arguments with an insurance company and a total out of pocket cost of $10.00 for some aspirin. 

Here is a picture of me on my 64th birthday in July.  

Ken

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