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Dory Skiff plans


Hirilonde
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Dave,

You want a rowboat, sailboat, motorboat? And you mean a skiff, like a real transom, like a Lowells skiff, or what have you?

I have a ton of old crap to dig through, including lots of lines and offsets of interesting boats I hand drew or copied.

Sounds like a fun project. I love lapstrake. I like cutting the bevels and gains...

Anyway, we'll get you rolling, somehow. :)

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I need something like this:  http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/wf/badger/ but.....................

 

It needs to have more beam, about 5'-5" and maybe a little longer.  It needs to accept a 25 HP outboard.  It will be a consignment build for a customer.  They need something stable to ferry people and gear to and from a small island house on a salt pond, but want something a little classier than a work skiff.  Thanks for chiming in Robert.

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Sure. Not to be that guy, but did you check The Dory Book?

There's a 16 x 5'5" semi dory and a 20 x 5'9" semi dory in there. Both have outboards in wells, but that's easy to fix, eh?

The 16 is claimed to be able to handle a 25...

I can put up the lines and offsets if you need. Or, I can keep digging, too.

This sounds a fun project.

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I would look at something other than a dory style of skiff. Given your desires, the relatively narrow and flat bottom, plus the 25 HP outboard will tend to make this an uncomfortable ride. That Farmer design is a heavy puppy, compaired to modern designs. A glued lap version of that set of shapes, would be close to half its weight. A more conventional skiff (less topside flare), with better shaped aft sections, preferably V bottomed or "double wedged" round bilge, will be better suited to blasting through chop. If looking for building ease, with more charm (lapstrake), then the simple V bottom skiff is the route. If the fetch your clients have isn't particularly rough or long, then the flat bottom is the ticket. Any single chine skiff can have it's topside done in lapstrake and it's much easier too, as the planks land on the same plane, so no rolling bevels, except in the gains. Glen-L has the "Little Hunk" if you want the perky sheer and flare of the dory. Bateau has several options too.

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PAR, I sure ain't trying to argue. I ain't at all knowledgable about motor boats. I just thought to post the boats in question, to see them. These seem sort of like flat iron skiff skillets with roundish dory sides slapped on.

The 16' and 19' power dories from The Book...

Again, not advocating, just relaying them. This is a thread I can learn a bit from, I think...

Peace,

Robert

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How the boat handles chop, or how fast it can go into waves is of little concern here.  Occasionally it will be taken out on the pond and opened up, but in minimal waves.   The boat will primarily be a taxi cab / pick up truck for getting to a small cottage on an island in a salt pond that is barely deeper than a swamp.  Stability loading heavy stuff and landlubbers from the dock into the boat and the reverse at the island dock is a significant consideration.  Being able to run it aground and bump into dock pilings is a real plus.  Shoal draft is a must.  Weight isn't really an issue except that a bit heavy adds to stability and durability.   A simple work skiff is now in use and really is the ideal boat, but the customer wants something that looks a little more elegant.  Probable the best phrase I can think of to describe it would be "a gentleman's work skiff".  The design I have always called a dory skiff, or as John Gardiner calls it a "semi-dory" is what I think we are looking for.  Then again, he might just want a new work skiff.

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Given your refined SOR, a skiff, scow or jon boat, are what you want. Not much flare to the topsides, a nice wide bottom panel and some runners so when you do run aground, or up onto a beach, nothing happens. The Atkins designs will be traditional build types (ribs, floors, stringers, etc.), though shaped well, also fairly heavy by modern standards. There are lots of flat bottom skiff designs with modern materials and build methods and these will require much less in terms of materials, though a higher "goo factor". Have a look at my Digger 17 skiff, which is a typical working skiff, but has the lapstrake option, to dress her up. As I mentioned, making strakes on a boat like this is really easy, you literally just bend it around, as they land on the same plane, so the bevels are the same (or non-existent). Additional thoughts might include hefty rub rails, seeing as you land on docks a lot, small side decks, so you have something to step on entering the boat with maybe a step or two to help the farmers get into it.

 

If I had to make the choice, I'd go with a skiff, as blunt bow boats tend to make a bit of noise and can toss spray, which lubber have issue with. A skiff at modest speeds will do much better and the pointy end on the front is a reassuring thing. If maximum interior volume was the big ticket item, well, the blunt bow type starts to look better. Designs to consider should have modest, almost vertical topside panels, to maximize initial stability, say no more than 7 - 8 degrees of flare. Transom rake should be in the 14 - 16 degree range (15 degrees is common), so the outboard can have some adjustment. Lastly, the bow needs a fair bit of rake, which will keep it drier and knock down spray.

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To be honest Dave, you could design this all by yourself. Give the bottom a moderately fine entry and draw the sheer to have a fairly uniform angle from bow to stern. This is very easy to plank. A few inches of rocker in the forward sections, with the last half of the bottom dead flat. Transom raked 15 degrees and whatever you like for the stem rake.

 

A 1/2" bottom, with 1/4" sides is all you need. This is pretty light, especially with a load of lubbers and a 25 HP outboard. There's two approaches to this type of boat, one is an extra thick bottom, to provide longitudinal stiffness and the other is to make a beam, by triangulating the bottom panels with the sole (stringers and athwart partitions). I use the extra thick bottom most of the time, as it's easier. Digger 17 has two bottom a 1" (2 layers of 1/2") or a heavy duty (3 layers of 1/2"). 1" would be fine for your needs.

 

Fillet and tape the inner seams with 4 layers of 12 ounce biax (assumes 1" bottom), the outside only needs two layers of biax (1/2" sides). The stem and transom just two layers externally and 3 inside. The transom can be 1" thick if pushing to just over displacement speeds, but increase to 1 1/4" - 1 1/2" if you want it to plane off. A few frames would be nice, but not necessary if a small side deck is glued and screwed over some stubby deck beams or hanging knees. If you want lapstrake, you can use 3/8", with 3/4" - 1" laps, maybe 4 strakes per side. 1/2" would be a bit stronger and heavier, but just as easily to bend around. Sounds like a good weekend or two project.

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Some interesting ideas here.  If I were building this for myself I would probably go with something like Paul describes, and maybe even just build the lapstrake version of his Digger 17.  The boat will live in the water year round and the customer is really interested in a conventional plank on frame boat.  As discussions and ideas evolve it looks like it will be a question of whether I can come up with plans for a dory skiff that will be close to as stable as a simple quahog skiff. Quahog is the Narragansett word for a hard shell clam which all RIers use even today.

 

This is our work skiff at the marina, a copy of a "quahog skiff".

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There are plenty of carvel or conventional lapstrake designs available. Avoid the file planked bottom versions, as these tend to leak much sooner than fore and aft planking, as powerboats.

 

Again, this is also something you could pen up Dave. Place 1x4" or 1x6" frames on 16" - 18" along her length, simple stem and stern framing, etc. 3/4" bottom planks, with 1/2" or 5/8" topside planks. It'll weigh a lot more and will leak quickly, but with regular caulking and reasonable care, certainly a fine little ship. Maybe batten seam to help keep her water tight.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Have you looked at the Tolman Skiff Standard?  Basically a planing warped hull skiff with dory sides.  Decent ride quality, efficient, easy to build, very seaworthy.  The plans are made for S&G and plywood panels but no real reason one couldn't be done in lapstrake. It is 18' in it's standard version but could be scaled down to 17 to suit your needs and a 25HP outboard should push it nicely.to about 20 MPH with 3 persons aboard

 

Another starting point for ideas might be the Long Point which checks off most your boxes.

http://www.thomasjhillboatdesigns.com/the_long_point.html

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I am looking for plans to build a conventional lapstrake dory skiff, 16-17 feet with a beam of 5 ft. or a little more.  This is a little bigger than I can find plans for so far.  Any links or sources appreciated.

Perhaps something such as this one?

http://www.atkinboatplans.com/Sail/ActiveIII.html

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