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bagarre

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Posts posted by bagarre


  1.  

     I'm getting pretty good at scarfing :)

    Nothing in any of these forum sections scares the people who have never done it more than scarf joints.  Well, that is until they do a few............

     

    Very true - it was the one thing I worried about the most.

    You think it needs to be some high precision woodworking thing but: Cut it - glue it - clamp it - sand it.

     

    The jig on the table saw really simplified it but you could to the same with a hand saw, bench plane and a little elbow grease.


  2. The first one sounds perfect for a Boy Scout group or summer camp type of project but the seconds sounds better for a couple or family. Like you said, it would be more of a week vacation at the lake for the non-builders of the family.

     

     

    The second would cost more due to room and board but the non-builder side of the relationship might enjoy it more - which may allow more people to go in the first place.


  3. Jeff pointed out that my stringers should go over the masik and not under like I have them. Only the center stringer goes over.

    I was going to leave it alone but, after fitting the coaming, I can see that it will change the appearance of the boat a fair amount.

     

    As I make the swap, should the stringers terminate at the masik or should they extend a few inches aft? Extending them aft would extend the line in the fabric and may look better.

    Thoughts? How have others done this?

     

    post-5722-0-61466100-1471527534_thumb.png


  4. As I said, never had one fail yet and I just drill pilot holes and screw them in. I have at a couple of boats that had a lot of years and miles on them.

    It has to be frustrating when the inexperienced don't take advice and over engineer solutions :)

     

    On my first (and only)  boat 15 years ago, I remember the indecision of not knowing what was strong enough. I was so afraid of something failing that I took 10 times longer to build the thing and never really trusted it.  

     

    I decided to split the difference and screw them in without glue but still lash either side to prevent splitting.

     

    post-5722-0-38120600-1471313464_thumb.jpg


  5. Here's a better picture.

    I dont' know of an easier way to build up the cheek laminations because they are thinner than the coaming itself.

    I thought about building the coaming hoop first and laminating directly to that but it might be hard to finish the bottoms of the cheeks are they are tapered.

    post-5722-0-82853500-1471278140_thumb.jpg

     


  6. Second kayak is framed but we didn't get it outside for a frog.

     

    I saw someone post shots of laminated rub rails for the bow and stern. Having some left over walnut and maple, I coudlnt resist.

     

    I also found some nice #7 1" bronze screws with smaller finish heads to hold them on. Should look pretty and be functional.

    post-5722-0-26471200-1471274362_thumb.jpg


  7. Can you recommend a good name to look for?

    The prices are all over the map which tells me so is quality but I'd rather not spend more than i need to get a decent blade.

     

    The shaving horse looks useful but I'd need to make a dozen paddles before it was worth making.

    For now, a couple good over center clamps attached to the bench will do fine.


  8. Instead of making a plane, I decided to just use the router.

    I'll have more photos of the lip later but here are of few of the setup.

     

    A few things I've learned:

     

    Screwing a 4x4 the work bench and running a single bolt thru the form allows me to rotate it <- huge convenience.

     

    Cutting the form to allow for the cheek blocks <- huge PITA. It puts the clamps at bad angles and they slip off because the two surfaces are not parallel. 

    I ended up running some screws into the forms so the clamps had something to push against. Drove me nuts and added a lot of time to the project.

    Also, when cutting the clamp slots, take into account the max throat of your spring clamps and make sure you can clamp all the layers. After two layers, I wasnt able to use the spring clamps and needed to do everything with pipe clamps.

     

    Pre-bend the wood. Use your heat gun and clamp as you go. Having your wood close to the final shape saves you frustration when gluing and gives you much tighter seams.

     

    PVC clamps are wonderful! Thanks to Jeff for this idea.

     

    Will post more pics later.

     

    post-5722-0-80231000-1471269973_thumb.jpg

     

    post-5722-0-16245000-1471269992_thumb.jpg

    post-5722-0-93318800-1471270003_thumb.jpg

    post-5722-0-76835800-1471270016_thumb.jpg

    post-5722-0-68797800-1471270033_thumb.jpg

     


  9. The last paddle I made was in 2003 and all I had was my trusty block plane.

    It took a month of sundays.

     

    This time, I'm armed with a spoke shave but could use something a bit more aggressive to get things going.

     

    I'd like to try roughing them out with a draw knife but, I've never used one before and have no idea what size or shape is best.

     

    Any recommendations or tips in selecting or using a drawknife for shaping paddle blades? 

     

    I'm thinking a straight 8" draw knife would be a good start. Is that too big? Would a curved blade be easier to manage?

     

    thanks.


  10. The last paddle I made was in 2003 and all I had was my trusty block plane.

    It took a month of sundays.

     

    This time, I'm armed with a spoke shave but could use something a bit more aggressive to get things going.

     

    I'd like to try roughing them out with a draw knife but, I've never used one before and have no idea what size or shape is best.

     

    Any recommendations or tips in selecting or using a drawknife for shaping paddle blades? 

     

    I'm thinking a straight 8" draw knife would be a good start. Is that too big? Would a curved blade be easier to manage?

     

    thanks.


  11. I thought about lashing maple blocks to the frame and bolting the foot rests to those but, I really like the aluminum brackets.

    Adding a small block to help transfer the load to the frame is a good idea tho. I may look into trying to incorporate that idea.

     

    I did some tests lastnight in leftover cedar strips using #7 1" screws.

    Pre-drilling is very important. Without pre-drilling, the wood will split or you wont be able to torque the screw.

    I used a #40 drill bit for the #7 screws.

     

    In a vice, you really need to put a wrench on the bracket to work it loose. Again, the wood split before the holes gave out. The amount of force was very high.

    To prevent splitting, I lashed the stringer on either side of the bracket. I think the bracket would deform before I could rip it off.

     

    To take it a step forward, I'll predrill and fill the holes with TB3 glue. Once the glue dries, I'll  chase the holes with the drill and run the screws in.

    That should strengthen the softer cedar and make the brackets near bomb proof.

     

    Thanks!

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