Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/05/2021 in all areas

  1. I Asked my granddaughter if she would like to do the artwork on my kayak. She kept it a surprise, didn't let me see it till it was done. I told her to do she wanted to. I think she knocked it out of the park.
    4 points
  2. Alan sent me an email asking if I had any good pictures of Skeena to provide to SCA for a story Marty Loken was doing on "camp cruisers you can build". I sent a few pictures to Marty, including one that was taken by a photographer from CLC that was on a support boat on the trip to Cox Creek winery. My longtime friend and sailing partner Joe was with me. This trip was a new event at the MASCF. I got an email from Marty saying that that pic had been chosen for the cover, which has been quite a thrill for me. Building Skeena was a long process but having her is such a joy. I've been singing "when I get my picture on the cover, gonna buy five copies for my mother" who sadly isn't with us anymore, but was the one who instilled craftmanship into my life. Thanks Alan, Graham, Carla and all the fine folks at B & B, and to all those who showed me the way, and answered my questions. Barring catastrophe, I will see you at the messabout with covergirl Skeena.
    4 points
  3. One of the things I love about going to the Messabout is learning something new. This year Graham asked me if I had seen any of the Swedes videos on foam core boat building. I told him I had not. Graham knows I am interested in foam core boat building, perhaps he also knows two of my grandparents immigrated from Sweden. Anyway my interest was piqued. So now I am learning a little more about the interesting life of Sven Yrvind. He is a bit of a blue water sailor so his mindset is a little different from us coastal cruisers but his emphasis on the advantages of keeping boats small and simple certainly resonates.
    4 points
  4. Here is the first installment. It was a grand adventure but as much fun as it was to leave, it was even better to return. The trip was everything that I hoped that it would be. People asked me why I rushed, I could have spent a year doing that trip but you cannot just abandon your home. We live in hurricane alley and I did not want to leave Carla to have to face one alone. I was able to get a good flavor of the area and I can drive to places in the future and I can do a section in as much depth as I like. I did this trip for many reasons. It is obvious that my voyaging days are over so I made this like a mini voyage and I also wanted to prove the mk3’s as a valid coastal micro cruiser. Carlita turned out to be close to perfect for me. The only improvement that I can think of would be to have a 20 mk3. Nothing wore out or broke except for the wind indicator when I scraped it against the mizzen mast while raising the main mast between bridges. I was able to glue it back together. Note to self, watch the indicator as it passes by the mizzen mast. Beside being fast and easy to sail, navigating in shallow water was where she excelled. She covered many miles in water less than a foot deep with no centerboard or rudder, steering and tacking with just the sails. When aground I would walk around the boat, looking for deeper water. The bowsprit gave me the leverage to rotate the boat to face the deeper water. The boomkin was just the right height to lift and push. I usually got away with it, saving me from having to wait for the next tide. An electric pump for the water ballast would be handy so that you could lighten the boat quickly if the tide was falling. I tested the water ballast several times. I naively thought that Delaware Bay was going to give me a break. The forecast was SE 10 to 15 knots, I ended up with 2 reefs in each sail and still surfed to 8 knots. I broached her twice, the first time I was concentrating too hard on the chart and got way off course at the wrong time. The second, I got slammed on the starboard quarter by a breaking wave. The rudder ventilated down the low pressure side and around we went. To my amazement we never heeled past about 20 degrees and suddenly we were safely laying a-hull. Several times I deliberately rounded up to reef or to tend to some business but with the luxury of picking my time. Single handing can be hard sometimes. Another test was on the last day: There was a small craft warning for Pamlico Sound with forecast SW winds gusting from 20 to 30 knots. I was only 28 miles from home. I decided to get underway at 5 am to beat down the Pungo River and cross the Pamlico River before the wind reached full strength. The plan worked well and just before the Hobucken Cut got narrow I decided that I could afford to put the anchor down and have breakfast. I left the sails up as it was going to be a short stop. It was hot down below with the vent and hatch dogged down. I opened the hatch to full wind scoop, forgetting about the sail. It was very pleasant. Suddenly a big gust blew the bow to port and the reefed foot of the main caught on the hatch and we were laying over. By the time I got on deck and realized what the problem was we were upright and it was over. I lowered the hatch to just a foot above the deck and life was good again. When I went to raise the anchor it felt like it was fouled. It was the hardest breakout of the whole trip. I have some other ballast ideas to try but I think that it is valid as is. Steve, yes I brought the anchor back to the cockpit and I am very pleased with it. There is nothing special except that I have a cleat about 18” forward of the sheer break. I left the bitter end tied to the bowsprit tube and the main part of the 100 ft rode in the anchor locker, the rest was just flaked on the cockpit forward. The Danforth self launches because it does not stow neatly. The Bruce/ claw stows neatly but I have to give it several flicks from the cockpit before it will launch.
    4 points
  5. Just finished our new electric mini-boat. The plan is to build another so Debbie and I will each have one. Then try to promote them in our area and get a little messabout group going. Finally got the new mini in the water. All went well. Even the pup enjoyed the ride. Now I can start mini #2 and get the final plans drawn up. They'll be available to you guys soon. 100_0607.MOV
    3 points
  6. Ravenswood—low volume and standard. The LV has been varnished with poly urethane and is ready to be covered. With the frames cut and stringers made, the second on went together quickly—three days from frames in the jig to FROG. It’s startling how fast they come together when everything is prepped. Laminating and then sanding and finishing the coaming is the slowest part. Takeaway from the coaming is to use very thin, straight-grained stock. I used African mahogany (wood store had a nice piece of 8/4) but next time I’d use maple or oak as Jeff recommends. Also cut it very thin. The book said 3/16ths, I went with 1/8, but next time I go for 3/32s. 1/8 was as thin as I could get on my table saw but if you have access to a band saw set up for re-sawing go thinner. The mahogany looks great but the grain was a little squirrelly. I don’t think it was worth the extra effort. Looking forward to getting them launched now! Hal
    3 points
  7. We finally finished lashing my wife’s Ravenswood LV. It’s astonishingly light at 18 lbs minus coaming. Next up, assembling my Ravenswood Standard. Frames and stringers are done so we’re hoping it will go together more quickly.
    3 points
  8. In spite of a below average cold January/ February I have had 3 good sails so far. Last but not least was last Wednesday when Craig brought his brand new SR20 to the shop to test sail. As the weather was light there was no point in filling the ballast tanks. The breeze did fill in some after we got out of camera range. Her performance unsurprisingly felt like a CS20 but also different with her self draining cockpit and no trunk filling in the forward half of the cockpit and the motor in a well. We got to try the helm balance which gave just the amount of weather helm that I like. I could have easily tuned it out with the centerboard if I wanted. The propane outboard was fired up and tested. As it was new we could not run it hard but I liked everything that I saw, perhaps a bit noisier than I expected. I really liked the motor well. I did not initially like the tiller being that high as it has to be to clear the motor, both up and down (we all worked hard to try and squeeze it down) but after a while I did not notice it. Of course if the breeze was up I would be holding the tiller extension. Bias aside, I think that she is our best open cruiser.
    3 points
  9. Thanks but all are not back safe yet!!! Still some sailors on the course! Kevin (KDubs) and his daughter (Maggers) are closing in on the finish right now in their Core Sound 17 #398! They are doing great. https://watertribe.com/Events/ChallengeGMapper.aspx Here's a video i took from our first day sailing.
    3 points
  10. Heading out for a month’s vacation. Today was my last chance to help The Weezer get her boat ready for a first sail. (She just completed 10th grade.) Still a few things for her to do: assemble a trailer kit, place the sail battens, install daggerboard bungee, practice and make some “tweaks”. (A reefing cringle wasn’t included in the leech of the sail; something to figure out when I’m back. Plus, she’s missing a part for the gooseneck that connects to the sail tack… it’s tied for now.) I look forward to heading to the lake with Norma T when she takes THE RITALOU out.
    3 points
  11. Got the short shot lashed and oiled. Used red cedar and 3/8 okoume plywood.
    3 points
  12. Been a while since posting, but you can see more details on THE HULL TRUTH and also on my blog., Just primed the boat yesterday!
    3 points
  13. And the name shall be “KALOS”. In the New Testament, Greek lexicon beautiful, handsome, excellent, eminent, choice, surpassing, precious, useful, suitable, commendable, admirable beautiful to look at, shapely, magnificent good, excellent in its nature and characteristics, and therefore well adapted to its ends genuine, approved precious And who doesn’t think their boat is all that!
    3 points
  14. Hi Guys- Both masts are ready for sealing. The main mast glue up went really well and didn’t require any help to get it done. A huge time saver was clamping the staves together and applying the glue all at once. On the mizzen I did them one at a time and it took a surprising amount of time. I coated the inside of the staves the night before the glue up which made it a lot less messy. Using hose clamps and zip ties seems to be the way to go. Also having jigs to hold the staves in place is a real help. On the main I installed a plug from the butt end to slightly above where the tabernacle will end. This also helped with the assembly since it kept the last 2 staves from falling into the mast as it was assembled. If you are contemplating a birds mouth mast I would try to have a sharp jointer plane available for the shaping. It made the process so much easier than it could have been. I just walked along the strongback and beautiful shavings curled off and there was no concern for a wavy line. From the previous pics you can see that I went from the #7 jointer to a bevel up smoother and then a block plane. After that I used a scraper plane and finally some sanding. The sanding was minimal since the planning left me with a pretty nice surface. I set up the masts in V blocks so I could easily rotate the masts as I worked. Using my RO Sander in one hand and rotating the mast with the other acted a bit like a lathe, if that makes sense. The final sanding was done with a soft pad on the sander. If you are really fussy you can feel some irregularities in the masts, but I am quite happy with the end product. I keep repeating my mantra “perfect is the enemy of the good”. I really enjoyed fabricating these masts. Is it practical compared to aluminum masts? Probably not since it is a lot more work and more expensive. That said, if we wanted to save work and money we would buy a used plastic boat.
    3 points
  15. After all the priming an sanding I couldn’t figure out a reasonable way to paint all in one shot. So I painted the hull, will give the paint a day or two to get used to not being in a can, then drape the hull then shoot the deckhouse.
    3 points
  16. This past May, I joined the Dinghy Cruising Association (United Kingdom — Roger Barnes, President.) Part of the membership includes a quarterly journal, available in print and digital. Also available through the association membership is access to their forum and digital access to over ten years of their journal. I’ve read through a few of the previous journals, but I received my first print copy last week. I think it is a high quality production in terms of writing, photography, amount of material, and things of interest to a small-sailboat enthusiast. And so, I am sitting here in my screen tent at 10:30 pm in a Minnesota State Park campsite, paging through for the first time my copy of the 100+ page journal… …when I spot a familiar looking Core Sound 15… familiar, because I built it last year. How fun to see this. I had already spotted my name among the 86 new members from around the world listed on pages 6 and 7… but seeing the Norma T pop out at me from page 73 of this delightful magazine was a real surprise. I hope the boat presents itself reasonably well here. It’s just a snapshot that I took while walking back from parking my car/trailer after launching it the first time this year. I had posted it on the DCA Facebook page… and my post was placed into their magazine. ? AND, it should be recognized that this forum is also “International.” My LINKS on this forum: Blog: “Building the Norma T” Blog: “Sailing the Norma T” Blog: “Building Joe” (Introduction) Blog: “Building Joe” (Continuation)
    3 points
  17. I appreciate everyone that posted pictures of their projects and finished frames. They helped me immensely. Here are some of mine. The spring clamps came in handy when positioning the stringers on the frames because of the one-handed operation. I also found adjustable bungy cords very effective.
    2 points
  18. Padre, it was definitely unnerving flying the drone. If doing it again i'd launch from the stern deck because the drone immediately attempts to stop moving over the ground once airborne so you have to fly away quickly to avoid sailing into it. The cockpit coaming cutouts are standard on the 17mk3 and i'm sure you cut add them to your boat. There is no divider but I did add a divider on my 20mk3. Here is a picture I did that so i could put stuff in there without it sliding back and not being able to reach it. I knew any oars I use would be 2 piece and so would fit in the stern part. The coaming space was never factored into the floatation of the boat they're purely aesthetic and functional for cockpit comfort but of course if you seal them they will add some floatation and righting moment if they go under. We just did some more capsize testing of the Chiefs CS-17 Mark3 with a mast head float and i'll post the results soon. Hey Joe! thanks. Its the first time I've ever tried flying the drone off a moving boat. I did 2 flights and the first one the boat was wing on wing. Unfortunately the drone wasn't recording!!! but i did get some still images so thats how i got that shot. The second flight we gybed the main to make it easier to fly away from the boat after takeoff.
    2 points
  19. Nice video. And nice catch of the drone. I haven’t tried flying mine yet (bought one last year on a whim) but will begin once I’m home from this vacation. Seems a bit nervy to fly from and back to a moving boat… but if I can develop some skill with the controls… maybe. At least it’s proven here to be a possibility. From what I can see the boat looks well built with some great extra features. I caught this glimpse of a cutout in the coaming… very handy looking for tucking things away. And it looks like it is blocked off from the rest of the coaming to preserve flotation. (The best snapshot I could get.)
    2 points
  20. Some more fun pictures! We plan on taking it out next weekend!
    2 points
  21. I flew twice to Raleigh and drove down. The first time I stayed in New Bern. It was a pain. Second time I rented a minivan and used it as a tent. Much more fun! This year Skeena will make an appearance behind my car.
    2 points
  22. Some folks keep logs of their projects including time spent. I can understand the urge to quantify, but I build boats, build model boats, carve decoys, and rebuild bicycles for the fun of it. When I worked as an engineer, I had to keep track of time spent for billing. It was not fun. When people ask me how much time I spent on a project, I usually reply "How much time did you spend watching TV?" Having said that, I agree with Scott that a SOF kayak goes together quicker than a stitch-and-glue kayak, based on my experience. Another difference is that almost all tasks on a SOF boat can be done in small time periods. For example, you can take 15 minutes to cut out one frame. You can mount one frame on the strong back. You can sew one foot of the skin seam. Of course, it's likely that you'll work for much longer periods (time flies when you're having fun), but you can do bits here and there. In contrast, there are major tasks on a stitch-and-glue boat that cannot be interrupted. These require mixing epoxy and applying it all at once. Stitch-and-glue boatbuilding is noisier (lots of sanding), smellier (epoxy), dustier (again sanding), and messier (again epoxy). I find SOF boatbuilding more fun. James, I hope you have fun building (and paddling).
    2 points
  23. And ya still have all your fingers?!
    2 points
  24. This is one of those "well, I did this other thing" posts. I decided on 1/4" HDPE plastic for a keel strip, because its cheap and I knew I would cringe over grinding away a metal strip on ramp pavement or whatever. I used G-flex epoxy and flame-treated the plastic to help the epoxy stick. I figured the plastic would be a little slipperier for launching and retrieving off the trailer, but I don't know whether that's actually the case. Three seasons- so far so good. Bob
    2 points
  25. I'll say -- Close hauled all the way. At least you two finished. Not sure where/how we lost our steam, but we had some great sails and an even better experience. Made it to Goodland and called it a week. I think about it every day.
    2 points
  26. Yea high everyone i built a roller tray with nine rollers and placed it down the center line of the trailer that I had retrofit to fit this boat the boat keel makes full contact from about bulkhead 1 to just forward of the motor well also installed bunk pads to keep her steady
    2 points
  27. 2 points
  28. My centerboard popped open at the mizzen thwart, probably because of road bumps bouncing the board while on the highway. I glued and bolted a stop just like you.
    2 points
  29. I am nearing the end of my YMCA swim season so I’ve been a little busy but I found time this weekend to work on my boat! I worked on the strips in the outside and then flipped it over to start work on the inside of the boat! My cousin who is very artistic is making a sticker that says The Ritalou for the back. And if you remember from one of my first post I wanted be brave in the white lines so she is making that for me as well! (My dad will be happy to hopefully get his garage space back!)
    2 points
  30. I told my wife the most important part of the build was sanding, therefore she should do it. After that I picked myself up off the garage floor and went back to work.
    2 points
  31. I have used Express Air which is located at the Victoria airport for importing things into Canada. They have a terminal in Blaine, Washington to receive the item then they truck/ferry it to Victoria. You go to the airport and walk the paper work through customs. They are quite reasonable cost wise. Last year I imported a vintage motorcycle in a crate and they charged me $50. I think I got a “good customer” deal on that but using this service has saved me a lot of money over the years.
    2 points
  32. There is no reason why you cannot build an equal quality boat from the plans. We use the same parts file for the full size plan sheets that come with the plans as the cut file for the kit. You do not have to do any scaling or lofting. If you are meticulous in marking and cutting, and use a good quality marine ply, you will have the same boat. You do have to do your own scarfing but you can do butt tape joints, which are just as strong but take extra fairing. The point that some have made about the huge time saving of the kit cannot be over emphasized. It all depends on your burnout index. If you have a bunch of unfinished projects in your life, starting from plans might not be a good idea. We have shipped quite a few kits to Canada but we usually get burned because the Customs finds an extra fee or two that was not in the shipping quote. The cost does go up as it crosses the border. We have shipped to an address on this side of the border and the customer has driven over and picked it up. If it can be picked up from a depot, everyone can save a bundle because they charge a lot for home delivery and the mk3 kit is so heavy that you need a truck with a forklift. The lid is just screwed down but drivers cannot wait for you to remove the lid and decant the contents. As for headroom, at 6'5" you would be much happier with the 20. I was on Carlita yesterday and thinking of you at 6' 5". At 5' 7" my head just touched the underside of the 1" deep beams sitting sitting tall on 2" cushions which squashed down to about 1/2". The extra 2" in the 3.2 version would not be enough for you, not to mention the extra legroom that you will need. After my trip to Port Townsend we brought out the updated MK3.2 version incorporating everything that we had learned. The main modification was to add 2" more headroom in both models. Everyone I talked to at the Wooden boat festival talked about headroom. Most of the the other modifications were to make it easier to build. There is not a lot more work in the 20 as they both have the same building steps. The 20 does have more surface area to glass, sand and paint.
    2 points
  33. About all I’m doing these days is to walk across the street to look at what The Weezer’s been doing, and to take a picture of her progress. It’s 8:30 am, I finally dressed and ate some breakfast. She already sanded the hull and nearly finished applying a second coat of primer. Clearly the morning schedules of an active high school kid are different from a retired guy. This is where things are as I “interrupted” her morning work. Edit: 15 minutes later, The Weezer sent me this : Now, having done all my morning “work”, I am going skiing. ⛷
    2 points
  34. The Weezer has painted the inside to her satisfaction but the paint needs more time to harden. As I write it’s -1 degrees and heading down for the night. There is some heat in the garage so we’ll see how things are in the morning. We cut some boards for the building form that can be used to support the boat when we flip it, hopefully tomorrow morning. Just for fun, she placed the missing seat, trunk, and deck pieces to see what it will look like. I think it is looking great. (Gunwales will be white, not taped blue .)
    2 points
  35. Hi salty cracker I had to take a break during my high school swim season so I have not been working much. Point padre just got the paint for my boat in so I hope to start painting it myself next weekend! I know you will love building a boat with your kids! It will be a forever memory! My best advice is take time! Don’t rush it. And it’s OKAY to make mistakes I made multiple mistakes and we found away to fix them all! Don’t get frustrated just take your time!
    2 points
  36. Don, I think you're making the right choice with the whole-boat tent and your point about organization is spot-on. I've done more land camping than boat camping, but when I was out on the boat I realized how much mental energy I was expending trying to remember where everything is. I think it's because, like you, I had to move everything from its sailing location to its camping location. That thing you need isn't where it was for the past 10 hours of sailing, and the boat is only 20 feet long, where can it be, WHY AM I SO STUPID AND THIS IS SUPPOSED TO BE FUN!?
    2 points
  37. So time to get her the right way up. Still another coat yet to go on the bottom, but time to add wood. I recall @Hirilonde's quote "now all I got to do is a whole lot more....".
    2 points
  38. Hi Guys- I spent around 5 hours planing and scraping the mizzen mast. When I got done with the planing and scraping it took less that an hour with 220 grit on my Festool sander to call it pretty much done. I am pleased with the outcome. Planing ATC is a true pleasure (assuming you are a wood nerd). Planes like butter. I could have used a power planer for the roughout but using a well tuned hand plane and some music is much more satisfying then the roar of power tools. If your haven’t worked with AYC, you have saved up a pleasure. Should be able to get the main mast glued up in the next couple of days. I started a Google Photos album to document the build. If you are interested in more pics here is the link; https://photos.app.goo.gl/wG9DSjkDfxqUCJUKA Here are just a few of the photos of the mast. Not necessarily in the right order. Ken
    2 points
  39. Then a lick of paint... I've used a roller on 2 pot Perfection. I've not really done much painting before so I expected a few issues. Getting into the fillets was the tricky bit - and obviously a skill to be acquired. However by the time the recommended three coats are on, it will probably look acceptable. @Hirilonde - I took your advice Dave - if I don't like a varnished transom, I can paint it any old time.
    2 points
  40. I have been doing some work on the masts. The 10:1 scarfs worked out well. I cut the birds mouths but made a rookie mistake on the mizzen. Thought I could get one mast done before dinner the other night and rushed my set up. Long story short, the staves are slightly narrower than they should be but I am pretty sure it will be ok. Woodworking has a way of keeping me humble. The next is tapering the staves. I gave it a lot of thought and decided my track saw would be the best way to do it quickly and accurately. The set up took some time but then each taper takes less than a minute to cut and yields a pretty perfect taper. I did one mast so far and will do the other one later today. Well, maybe I should do it tomorrow as it is getting late and I should learn from my mistakes! I put the mizzen together without glue to check the fit and it seems pretty good. Years ago I built a 20’ strongback on wheels for my strip boat builds. It has been really handy for building these masts so far. I have been noodling on the best way to glue up the mast and the strongback will be a key player in that step as well. I am waiting for some epoxy to show up here before I can do the assembly. Won’t have it until mid week so I might start cutting wood for the centerboard. The weather here has been pretty lousy or we would be doing some short trips on Rosie. Glad to have this project to work on in these wet British Columbia days.
    2 points
  41. Steve and his boat make an appearance is this video about 9:45.
    2 points
  42. Things have finally firmed up and I will be making the trek from Milwaukee. I'm planning to arrive Thursday afternoon or evening. I can launch then or Friday a.m., depending what time I arrive and who is around. I will have my tent, but I am planning to sleep on my boat if the weather is ok. Leaving late Sunday or Monday a.m. See you all then.
    2 points
  43. Amos, The bay crossing was exciting, but in a really good way. Doug and I got a late start crossing as I had a Zoom meeting for work that morning. Doug got some ice from a marina while I worked, so by the time we poked out of the Rhodes river it was 11 and the wind was freshening. The first 1/3 of the crossing was just joyful with full sail and not much chop, and then the wind freshened to the point I decided to put the first reef in. Doug already had one in and radioed that he was getting wet with spray and decided to put in a second one in his Marsh Cat. Without a Mizzen, that is an adventure, so I just hung out until he was underway again. I did take an occasional little splash, but remained relatively dry and now Skeena was in her element. There are a few zigs in the map in my previous post where I had to go back to wait for Doug. These were purposely inefficient tacks with luffing. Here's the last pic of the sea conditions I took: That pic is low res, but the boat on the left is the Gaff rigged Marsh Cat. I think that is Poplar Island on the left and probably Kent Point on the right. I'd been flying at 7+ and this is the second blip where I went back to be a better wingman. For the record, my boat has 5 feet more of waterline and is much faster and water ballasted and decked. But those Marsh Cats are very capable and Doug is an excellent and cautious sailor. We tucked into Tilghman Creek and took a lunch break. By now the wind was shifting to south/southwest, so I stayed in the lee of the western shore of the Miles river. I got to St Michaels at around 6:30 and the wind had lightened and I just sailed around the harbor while Doug caught up. I didn't really want the day to end. I put up the tent and that thing is gold. It kept the heavy dew off the seats forward of the mizzen, let me leave the hatch open at night (too cold for bugs) and gave me great shade all week. I never disassembled it as it fits below just rolled up and rigs in two minutes. I keep a list of improvements and I came home with just three. The dreaded too short sprit. I made mine two inches longer than the plans and I had trouble de-powering by flattening. I'm going to move the main sprit to the mizzen and make a new main sprit. I'm going to add a bilge pump to empty the tank. I have one rigged to fill it and it's whisper quiet. Those two-way pumps are noisy and expensive, so I'm just going to add another cheap bilge pump and wire a two-way switch for in and out. There may need to be a second valve. Winter is time for this kind of thing. I feel bad about my poor race performance, but I know the full tank in those light breezes was partially responsible. The second is to figure a way to plug the cockpit drains. I had six people in the boat and the guys in the back got wet feet. Also, when I was in Annapolis I had to back out of a spot for quite a long time in reverse and a bit of water was pushed in. When I was building the boat I had considered just putting a PVC ball valve in tubes. Whatever I do, this is a low priority. I do want to sail with Alan and/or Graham to figure out how to get more out of my sails. But the messabout just isn't in the cards this year due to work. But next year, knock on wood, I'll take a bunch of time off. All in all, it was a great week. Best thing was that there wasn't any other boats I coveted. Skeena is just a fantastic boat.
    2 points
  44. Hi Andy B, We do indeed have a boat with everything that you asked for. We are currently calling it the SR20 for self righting. Hull #1 is finished and we hope that it will be sailing at the messabout in October. It was a difficult assignment and we went through many iterations to get it right. Here is a cutaway view. We previously updated the Bay River Skiff with the centerboard moved to the cockpit side and raised the freeboard to increase the down flooding angle. Travis sailed it in the Texas 200 and reported that it went very well. Here is a link to the build pictures. https://photos.app.goo.gl/74WXsZVnrM9mAXkv9
    2 points
  45. Re:7 Maybe I had too many of my kids aboard… but I was the photo-taker (last fall) leaning back on the transom in my CS15. I’d think five more feet could make it possible for a couple more of the family. I really like the openness and space of this boat.
    2 points
  46. I agree with Jay, I really doubt you will be removing the motor enough to make a $615 mount like that worth it. Just make a mount out of wood, fiberglass it, and bolt it on. Take a look at build logs for pictures.
    2 points
  47. Here is a picture of the twisted gudgeons, post-incident. The bottom rod bent back some, so the top rods lifted out of their gudgeons. That allowed the bottom rod to twist to the side, but because it had a pin in it, it stayed in the gudgeon, motor attached and running. All the gudgeons are now replaced with heavy-duty ones, and all the rods have holes for pins.
    2 points
  48. I would like to add my congratulations to Graham for his successful circumnavigation. If his trip doesn't inspire you to get out and do some sailing then something is wrong with you. If you guys haven't seen the drone video, check it out using the "photo album" link on the trip log; nice job to whomever took that footage. Grahams track is going to useful when planning trips to the Chesapeake Bay; particularly on the ocean side of the peninsula. We should have a late springtime sailing meetup on the Chesapeake Bay sometime; an informal mini-messabout would be awesome. We could do a group sail to Tangier Island, or Smith Island, spend the night, and sail back the next day.
    2 points
  49. Still have some cosmetic items to finish but I’ve had it on the water. Paddles great! I did manage to tip over getting into it one time, still getting used to that. I have run aground on logs a few times also and haven’t ripped it, putting my mind at ease about its toughness. Planning on a camping trip with it at the end of them month. So glad I built this.
    2 points


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.