Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/25/2021 in all areas

  1. Graham might have taken his upgrades a bit too far this time. What do you think? He's installed a big barn door rudder too and a giant boom..... Ok maybe I had you going? We all know Graham is a tiller man. Someone who thinks he's funny plopped this in Carlita's cockpit. Graham looked pretty worried when he came in last week and we told him we had "done some work on his boat".
    7 points
  2. Taylor and Alan just launched the heir to the Stewart clan. You all may have noticed that there were no Stewarts in this years EC, and that is why. I thought that he was going to be really cool and launch himself to coincide with the EC but no, he decided to emerge in his own time. Design name, LOA and displacement will be posted later.
    7 points
  3. One of the things I love about going to the Messabout is learning something new. This year Graham asked me if I had seen any of the Swedes videos on foam core boat building. I told him I had not. Graham knows I am interested in foam core boat building, perhaps he also knows two of my grandparents immigrated from Sweden. Anyway my interest was piqued. So now I am learning a little more about the interesting life of Sven Yrvind. He is a bit of a blue water sailor so his mindset is a little different from us coastal cruisers but his emphasis on the advantages of keeping boats small and simple certainly resonates.
    4 points
  4. Here is the first installment. It was a grand adventure but as much fun as it was to leave, it was even better to return. The trip was everything that I hoped that it would be. People asked me why I rushed, I could have spent a year doing that trip but you cannot just abandon your home. We live in hurricane alley and I did not want to leave Carla to have to face one alone. I was able to get a good flavor of the area and I can drive to places in the future and I can do a section in as much depth as I like. I did this trip for many reasons. It is obvious that my voyaging days are over so I made this like a mini voyage and I also wanted to prove the mk3’s as a valid coastal micro cruiser. Carlita turned out to be close to perfect for me. The only improvement that I can think of would be to have a 20 mk3. Nothing wore out or broke except for the wind indicator when I scraped it against the mizzen mast while raising the main mast between bridges. I was able to glue it back together. Note to self, watch the indicator as it passes by the mizzen mast. Beside being fast and easy to sail, navigating in shallow water was where she excelled. She covered many miles in water less than a foot deep with no centerboard or rudder, steering and tacking with just the sails. When aground I would walk around the boat, looking for deeper water. The bowsprit gave me the leverage to rotate the boat to face the deeper water. The boomkin was just the right height to lift and push. I usually got away with it, saving me from having to wait for the next tide. An electric pump for the water ballast would be handy so that you could lighten the boat quickly if the tide was falling. I tested the water ballast several times. I naively thought that Delaware Bay was going to give me a break. The forecast was SE 10 to 15 knots, I ended up with 2 reefs in each sail and still surfed to 8 knots. I broached her twice, the first time I was concentrating too hard on the chart and got way off course at the wrong time. The second, I got slammed on the starboard quarter by a breaking wave. The rudder ventilated down the low pressure side and around we went. To my amazement we never heeled past about 20 degrees and suddenly we were safely laying a-hull. Several times I deliberately rounded up to reef or to tend to some business but with the luxury of picking my time. Single handing can be hard sometimes. Another test was on the last day: There was a small craft warning for Pamlico Sound with forecast SW winds gusting from 20 to 30 knots. I was only 28 miles from home. I decided to get underway at 5 am to beat down the Pungo River and cross the Pamlico River before the wind reached full strength. The plan worked well and just before the Hobucken Cut got narrow I decided that I could afford to put the anchor down and have breakfast. I left the sails up as it was going to be a short stop. It was hot down below with the vent and hatch dogged down. I opened the hatch to full wind scoop, forgetting about the sail. It was very pleasant. Suddenly a big gust blew the bow to port and the reefed foot of the main caught on the hatch and we were laying over. By the time I got on deck and realized what the problem was we were upright and it was over. I lowered the hatch to just a foot above the deck and life was good again. When I went to raise the anchor it felt like it was fouled. It was the hardest breakout of the whole trip. I have some other ballast ideas to try but I think that it is valid as is. Steve, yes I brought the anchor back to the cockpit and I am very pleased with it. There is nothing special except that I have a cleat about 18” forward of the sheer break. I left the bitter end tied to the bowsprit tube and the main part of the 100 ft rode in the anchor locker, the rest was just flaked on the cockpit forward. The Danforth self launches because it does not stow neatly. The Bruce/ claw stows neatly but I have to give it several flicks from the cockpit before it will launch.
    4 points
  5. Graham sent in this picture with the caption...”Missed it by only that much. Just 200 feet to deep water.”
    4 points
  6. Day 4 - Coinjock to North Landing RIver (27.2NM) Graham’s trek up the ICW continued with southerly winds that pushed him through Coinjock and past the Currituck Sound. A couple lines of thunderstorms swept through the area and around 3:30 Graham threw out the pick. I suspect the north winds arrived and he called it a day. That combined with the thunderstorms. Graham sent in this picture with the caption “second thunderstorm”. Graham reported earlier in the day that he was running with 2 reefs in the main and 1 in the mizzen. When asked about how his power system was holding up he said everything was working perfectly. He has on board a ~120Ah LiFePo4 battery which he is recharging from a 50watt solar panel using a Victron smart solar charge controller. A shunt monitors the battery state of charge. Graham reported that he battery is typically reading about 90% in the morning indicating that he is using about 9-10 Ah overnight running his anchor light, charging phone and running cabin lights and fan. He shouldn’t have too much trouble keeping up with that with his 50 watt panel.
    4 points
  7. The Wheezer is progressing toward the conclusion section of her little symphony (yes, I’m a musician, among other things.) I took nine photos during our three hours together today. She’s is doing the epoxy and varnish layers on her own. She decided to make the mast bushings as a first project of the day. This is one of those things where I described how to do the tasks and she did everything... I just watched. Starting the second bushing for the smaller mast piece... each of these needed about 90 inches of fiberglass tape (cut in half lengthwise.) Moving on to make bushings for the middle mast piece. These bushings only needed about 30 inches of fiberglass tape. They are set aside to harden. We’ll make collars after these harden and are fitting well. The skeg got a bigger fillet along its connection area to the hull. We moved on to flip the boat back over and to add the third layer to the gunwale. We could have bought some sealant to attach the outer layer but decided to use epoxy glue instead. It won’t be a working tender (until The Wheezer builds herself a cruising sailboat ?) and I don’t think the need will arise to replace the outer part of the gunwale. I think the thicker gunwale looks and feels better than with just the two layers. Plus, the strips we put on are the pre-rounded edges of the 5/4 inch treated 12 foot deck board from which she cut all the gunwale strips with a table saw. A bit of surface sanding is all that the gunwale will be needing. She decided she wanted the bow end to be a point rather than to have a blunt cut off nose. Builder’s choice. ? The rudder pieces are epoxy-coated on one side. I marked the areas in the inside of the rudder cheeks that will be glued and she put a first epoxy coat on the portions that won’t be glued. Two more layers and we’ll glue up the rudder. I let her know the choice that some make to bolt the end of the tiller to allow it to swivel up from the aft end of the rudder assembly. We’ll see if she wants to do that or glue it permanently (as is typical.) The last task she did in our three hours together was to drill a hole in the bottom of her boat inside the dagger board housing. We’ll router out the opening when we flip it over again. I added an extension to my 1/2” drill to reach the bottom. Both her parents are dentists... I suggested she could let them use this drill in their workplace. ?. Maybe just to give the patients a little “thrill?” ?. OK, maybe not. She admitted that it felt weird to drill that hole through the bottom... something that I believe most of us who’ve built a boat can relate to. As I left for home I took a shot of the pieces she will leave as a bright finish. A few more coats of varnish are still coming to them.
    4 points
  8. Received this from Textron Systems Retirees Association. Thought some of our forum members might enjoy it. “Do You Remember? Did You Have One? Do You Still Have One? “‘A TSRA Member recently sent us this humorous paragraph on the ancient computing device called a Slide Rule. “BREAKING NEWS: Mathematics Teacher Arrested at JFK... A school teacher was arrested today at JFK International airport as he attempted to board a flight while in possession of a ruler, a protractor, a compass, an ancient wooden device called a “slide-rule” as well as a code device called an “abacus” that he claimed was a calculator. At a morning press conference, the new Attorney General selectee said he believes the man is a member of the notorious Al-Gebra movement. He did not identify the man, who has been charged by the FBI with carrying weapons of math instruction. “Al-Gebra is a problem for us,” the Attorney General said. “Al- Gebra has terrorized many young people for years. They derive solutions by means and extremes and sometimes go off on tangents in search of absolute values” “They use secret code names like ‘X’ and ‘Y’ and refer to themselves as ‘unknowns,’ but we’ve determined that they belong to a common denominator of the axis of medieval with coordinates in every country.”
    4 points
  9. Thanks everyone. Mama and Henry are doing great. Very difficult delivery ending in c section but it's all over now. He is perfect.
    4 points
  10. New B&B design stats: Design name: Henry Wilder Stewart LOA : 21" 53.34cm Disp: 7lbs 5oz 3.32kg
    4 points
  11. Alan sent me an email asking if I had any good pictures of Skeena to provide to SCA for a story Marty Loken was doing on "camp cruisers you can build". I sent a few pictures to Marty, including one that was taken by a photographer from CLC that was on a support boat on the trip to Cox Creek winery. My longtime friend and sailing partner Joe was with me. This trip was a new event at the MASCF. I got an email from Marty saying that that pic had been chosen for the cover, which has been quite a thrill for me. Building Skeena was a long process but having her is such a joy. I've been singing "when I get my picture on the cover, gonna buy five copies for my mother" who sadly isn't with us anymore, but was the one who instilled craftmanship into my life. Thanks Alan, Graham, Carla and all the fine folks at B & B, and to all those who showed me the way, and answered my questions. Barring catastrophe, I will see you at the messabout with covergirl Skeena.
    3 points
  12. After all the priming an sanding I couldn’t figure out a reasonable way to paint all in one shot. So I painted the hull, will give the paint a day or two to get used to not being in a can, then drape the hull then shoot the deckhouse.
    3 points
  13. This past May, I joined the Dinghy Cruising Association (United Kingdom — Roger Barnes, President.) Part of the membership includes a quarterly journal, available in print and digital. Also available through the association membership is access to their forum and digital access to over ten years of their journal. I’ve read through a few of the previous journals, but I received my first print copy last week. I think it is a high quality production in terms of writing, photography, amount of material, and things of interest to a small-sailboat enthusiast. And so, I am sitting here in my screen tent at 10:30 pm in a Minnesota State Park campsite, paging through for the first time my copy of the 100+ page journal… …when I spot a familiar looking Core Sound 15… familiar, because I built it last year. How fun to see this. I had already spotted my name among the 86 new members from around the world listed on pages 6 and 7… but seeing the Norma T pop out at me from page 73 of this delightful magazine was a real surprise. I hope the boat presents itself reasonably well here. It’s just a snapshot that I took while walking back from parking my car/trailer after launching it the first time this year. I had posted it on the DCA Facebook page… and my post was placed into their magazine. ? AND, it should be recognized that this forum is also “International.” My LINKS on this forum: Blog: “Building the Norma T” Blog: “Sailing the Norma T” Blog: “Building Joe” (Introduction) Blog: “Building Joe” (Continuation)
    3 points
  14. Heading south into the Dismal Swamp.
    3 points
  15. All you needed to do was buy a Sprit Stretcher from B&B.
    3 points
  16. I used a similar product on my CS17, called Coppaboat (Australian product) The application was fairly easy. The epoxy copper mix needed to be stirred before loading the paint roller each time, as the copper powder is so heavy it quickly drops to the bottom of the paint tray. Then once cured it was burnished to expose the copper particles. So far it seems good, just needs a wipe with a sponge once a month to remove any slime. The Mathew Flinders looks like being a really capable boat, great build.
    3 points
  17. Weezer I think it is OK to have little celebrations along the way. You have accomplished a lot. Many boat builders maybe most boat builders do not get as far as you have. Many never get past looking at plans, some get bogged down when they find out how much work it is, or when they make their first mistake. Some builders on this forum have launched their boats still in their primer and some just coated in epoxy. That being said you will often hear "Great your boat is 90% completed but you still have 90% to go". Or when your boat is ready to paint it is a little less than half completed. There is some truth to that. When Dave says no celebrating just keep working it is because he does not want to see you fail he wants to see you succeed. It is like you are running a Marathon or swimming? and you reach a milestone and you high five all your friends, but your coach says OK keep your head down and keep working you have a ways to go yet.
    3 points
  18. Frames all cut! Now on to some routing and sanding and stringer cutting.
    3 points
  19. A little update: We’ve both had busy lives last week but had a few hours today to further prepare the inside for painting and we installed a few more pieces (breast hook, quarter knees, and mast step. The boat will be flipped soon to begin bottom work. For now, we’ll leave out the center seats (aft and middle) and foredeck (they are fitted and ready for installation.) Those pieces will be left bright with varnish while everything else will be painted.
    3 points
  20. I tried to paint the interior neatly and leave the deck beams exposed. It just didn't work and I painted the interior with good quality paint, all one color. Looks awesome and touch up is not stressful. Decided to not let perfection be the enemy of good......
    3 points
  21. Here is a FROG photo of my Curlew frame taken yesterday and a photo of its partially completed oak coaming. I was able to put the first coat of tung oil on my completed Curlew frame, ten years after purchasing the plans and many years after assembling the frame with zip ties. Thanks to my friend Steve Rouse for his help and his woodworking shop. We built the form for the coaming from the offsets in the book and just have to glue on the lip. We used 1/8th inch green white oak strips which we sanded with 80 grit paper, then wiped with alcohol before gluing with gorilla glue. The wood was incredibly flexible, no need for steam bending, but the glue seems to be holding very well in spite of the wood's 20% moisture content. We considered using G-flex epoxy but the gorilla glue set up in a couple of hours and I was able to plane off and sand off the excess that evening. We should have made the openings in our coaming form closer to the edge of the form to facilitate using spring clamps and we should have spent more time before the glue up planning to make sure our strips overlapped on the sides of the form rather than at the ends.
    3 points
  22. Only 1 built. Uses a hobie TI sail. https://photos.app.goo.gl/W7sCKMeHfdnepCECA
    3 points
  23. Ironically I just got the mail. I was surprised to find this letter, hat, sticker and copy of the magazine from WB What is really neat is that the had has embroidered the issue Skeena was in. Well done WB! I hope some builders see this and decide to build a CS20.3 or any other B & B boats. Take Care, Steve
    3 points
  24. I have used Express Air which is located at the Victoria airport for importing things into Canada. They have a terminal in Blaine, Washington to receive the item then they truck/ferry it to Victoria. You go to the airport and walk the paper work through customs. They are quite reasonable cost wise. Last year I imported a vintage motorcycle in a crate and they charged me $50. I think I got a “good customer” deal on that but using this service has saved me a lot of money over the years.
    2 points
  25. Happy new year. Yes they did. I stood the crate upright in the the garage and wrapped it with Christmas paper. It looked like the monolith from 2001: Space Odyssey except red, white and green instead of black. I asked them to take garbage out so they could "discover" it. We plan on beginning the build middle of April and will certainly start a build log and thread for it.
    2 points
  26. I’ll still give this set-up a try next summer… even though I’m receiving this boat on Sunday. Don, I think you’ll like what you come up with in making a longer tent-covering.
    2 points
  27. Don, I think you're making the right choice with the whole-boat tent and your point about organization is spot-on. I've done more land camping than boat camping, but when I was out on the boat I realized how much mental energy I was expending trying to remember where everything is. I think it's because, like you, I had to move everything from its sailing location to its camping location. That thing you need isn't where it was for the past 10 hours of sailing, and the boat is only 20 feet long, where can it be, WHY AM I SO STUPID AND THIS IS SUPPOSED TO BE FUN!?
    2 points
  28. I built a Curlew to go with my Stonefly canoe. Launched it on a beautiful 70 degree day. I've only ever paddled wide, super stable plastic kayaks, so it took me some time to get used to the lower stability. After half an hour of paddling, I was comfortable but still with plenty of room for improvement. I think I'll be very happy with it. Jeff mentioned in one of his videos that he recommends going with the laminated coaming instead of the plywood. If I do another one, I'll laminate for sure. Once in use, the plywood wasn't as rigid as it seemed like it would be during assembly. Finished weight is right at 30 pounds. 10oz polyester from George Dyson Western red cedar stringers Baltic birch plywood frames and coaming Artificial sinew bindings (waxed polyester) Rustoleum enamel paint on the fabric Helmsman's spar urethane on the wood
    2 points
  29. So time to get her the right way up. Still another coat yet to go on the bottom, but time to add wood. I recall @Hirilonde's quote "now all I got to do is a whole lot more....".
    2 points
  30. Open statement to all those fellow builders, friends and new acquaintances which attended this year's Messabout. I want to thank everyone especially our gracious hosts for coming out to celebrate a remarkable line of designs and share in the fellowship of these beautiful boats. Each year I learn volumes from the collective and enjoy such supportive commraderie. What a special experience. Thank you for coming out far and wide which further indicates to me the appeal of these boats. I hope to see you all on the water in the future. Fair winds and following seas.
    2 points
  31. Hi Guys- Both masts are ready for sealing. The main mast glue up went really well and didn’t require any help to get it done. A huge time saver was clamping the staves together and applying the glue all at once. On the mizzen I did them one at a time and it took a surprising amount of time. I coated the inside of the staves the night before the glue up which made it a lot less messy. Using hose clamps and zip ties seems to be the way to go. Also having jigs to hold the staves in place is a real help. On the main I installed a plug from the butt end to slightly above where the tabernacle will end. This also helped with the assembly since it kept the last 2 staves from falling into the mast as it was assembled. If you are contemplating a birds mouth mast I would try to have a sharp jointer plane available for the shaping. It made the process so much easier than it could have been. I just walked along the strongback and beautiful shavings curled off and there was no concern for a wavy line. From the previous pics you can see that I went from the #7 jointer to a bevel up smoother and then a block plane. After that I used a scraper plane and finally some sanding. The sanding was minimal since the planning left me with a pretty nice surface. I set up the masts in V blocks so I could easily rotate the masts as I worked. Using my RO Sander in one hand and rotating the mast with the other acted a bit like a lathe, if that makes sense. The final sanding was done with a soft pad on the sander. If you are really fussy you can feel some irregularities in the masts, but I am quite happy with the end product. I keep repeating my mantra “perfect is the enemy of the good”. I really enjoyed fabricating these masts. Is it practical compared to aluminum masts? Probably not since it is a lot more work and more expensive. That said, if we wanted to save work and money we would buy a used plastic boat.
    2 points
  32. Then a lick of paint... I've used a roller on 2 pot Perfection. I've not really done much painting before so I expected a few issues. Getting into the fillets was the tricky bit - and obviously a skill to be acquired. However by the time the recommended three coats are on, it will probably look acceptable. @Hirilonde - I took your advice Dave - if I don't like a varnished transom, I can paint it any old time.
    2 points
  33. They're sold as kayak lashing hooks. Something like this: https://www.amazon.com/RLECS-Lashing-J-Shaped-Boating-Accessory/dp/B082TTWCF6/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=kayak+nylon+hooks&qid=1632697601&sr=8-3
    2 points
  34. Re:7 Maybe I had too many of my kids aboard… but I was the photo-taker (last fall) leaning back on the transom in my CS15. I’d think five more feet could make it possible for a couple more of the family. I really like the openness and space of this boat.
    2 points
  35. I think the discussion about main-sheets proves everyone is different. I like the look of a clean transom as much as the next guy, and if I lived in an area where long runs out of a marina down an inlet weren't reality, I'd stow my motor. I'm with Jay. Where I sail I like having the motor at the ready just in case. Also if that thing is really $615 bucks, I'd pass. My mount cost me a sheet of luan to make a pattern and some southern yellow pine reinforcing. I can leave my Suzuki 2.5 long shaft on and just as easily put it away. I trailer with it hanging on the transom with no worries. Best two pics before I put the rear deck on: And finished with motor up:
    2 points
  36. I would like to add my congratulations to Graham for his successful circumnavigation. If his trip doesn't inspire you to get out and do some sailing then something is wrong with you. If you guys haven't seen the drone video, check it out using the "photo album" link on the trip log; nice job to whomever took that footage. Grahams track is going to useful when planning trips to the Chesapeake Bay; particularly on the ocean side of the peninsula. We should have a late springtime sailing meetup on the Chesapeake Bay sometime; an informal mini-messabout would be awesome. We could do a group sail to Tangier Island, or Smith Island, spend the night, and sail back the next day.
    2 points
  37. Still have some cosmetic items to finish but I’ve had it on the water. Paddles great! I did manage to tip over getting into it one time, still getting used to that. I have run aground on logs a few times also and haven’t ripped it, putting my mind at ease about its toughness. Planning on a camping trip with it at the end of them month. So glad I built this.
    2 points
  38. That's a new feature the software has. They indicated it would look at post count and time as a member, but obviously it didn't do that! I'll have to dig into the config and fix it! I don't want any of you thinking you're getting younger.
    2 points
  39. If you have not had the opportunity to read Alan's story of his experience competing in the North Carolina Challenge do yourself a favor and go to this link. Alan's adventure in the 2021 NCC This was posted on the Watertribe Facebook page. Alan gives a detailed and humorous report of the race, including the reasoning behind deciding to spend 30 hours squeezed into a kayak and the stresses that places on a sailor. Also don't forget to keep up with Graham who is in the middle of his epic adventure sailing around the Delmarva peninsula.
    2 points
  40. Don- I watched the video, skipping ahead in places. I used Alexseal on Rosie with very good results without the magic additive. They seem to be on the cutting edge with this stuff. How geeky can we be? Watching videos of paint drying?? Ken
    2 points
  41. I missed a few days but here is more copied over for those that haven't seen the latest. Day 6 (5/31) - Great Bridge Lock to Willoughby Bay (25 NM) Graham made good progress today into the Elizabeth River and past Norfolk finishing the day in the Hampton Roads area and anchoring in Willoughby bay. He has set himself up for crossing the Chesapeake Bay tomorrow to Cape Charles which is just over 24 NM straight across the bay. He has south east winds forecast switching to south west later in the day and should make good progress across with sunny weather and highs in the upper 60s. He reported his battery dipped to 79% with little sun the last couple of days. Day 7 (6/1)- Tues. June 1st - Made it to the Eastern Shore (24 NM) With an early start just before 7AM Graham set off north east and decided to head straight for Fisherman island which is the southern tip of the Delmarva Peninsula. Delmarva “,is a clipped compound of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia” quoting good old wikipedia and the term was not in general use until the 1920’s but nonetheless Graham is now officially on the eastern shore of Virginia. Graham sent this picture approaching the northern span of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. Vertical clearance directly ahead is 40 feet. He had talked about trying to gunkhole his way through a creek to get to the east side of the peninsula from Cape Charles but he made straight for the southern tip and through the Virginia inside passage toward Magothy bay. Just after 1pm he’d made it almost into Magothy bay and stopped perhaps to eat some lunch. Below, A view from the south looking north from Fisherman Island into Magothy bay. Blue arrow is where Graham was at 1pm in the Virginia inside passage. Graham stopped at Skidmore Island but saw signs indicating he could not disturb the island to it being a wildlife sanctuary so he pressed on and anchored just south of the town of Oyster in about 4 feet of water on a hard bottom he reported. His battery was at 67.5% and he said it would be nice to have a separate solar panel which he could position in the cockpit while underway but he still has plenty of power for now. The area he is in has about 4 feet of tide. Graham also mentioned seeing a good friend Phil Garland who was moving a boat and tied up near Graham in the Great Bridge Lock. Phil is the owner of CS-17 ‘La Perla’ and has also raced in the Everglades Challenge. I will try to get some pictures from him. Day 8 (6/2)- Visiting the town of Oyster (6 NM) Graham made a short trip from his anchorage to the town of Oyster arriving just after noon and likely taking advantage of some down time to explore and recharge. Day 9 (6/3) - Oyster to Willis Wharf (21.5 NM) This morning Graham reported in and said he was going to head north and try to make it through the inside route and navigate some skinny water that is unmarked. His goal is to stay on the inside the whole way up the eastern shore without going outside. With a 4’ tide he believes he can wait out any shallow patches. A couple of pictures from Graham... Skidmore island Below: “Strip planked flair bow slowly returning to nature. Something a fiberglass boat cannot do.” Day 10 (6/4)- Hanging out at Willis Wharf (0 NM) Graham reported this morning that he was going to hang out for the day at Willis Wharf since the weather was a bit yucky and head further north tomorrow. Yesterday was a bit tough with a long open fetch despite the shallow water making for some chop and difficulty navigation. This morning it was still raining a bit on Graham but he planned to head into the Wharf and see what was there. Day 11 (6/5)- On the move North (18 NM) Graham ended up spending most of yesterday on the hook. He poked into Willis Wharf but didn’t tie up due to it being pretty small and not looking like there was much there so he pressed on to Wachapreague and stopped early as he was pretty tired. Day 12 (6/6)- Wachapreague to Wallops Island (19 NM) Heard from Graham around 1pm. He was hard aground at the time at the bottom of the tide but by the time we finished talking he was starting to ooch along in the shallow water. Further North Graham had to do some really narrow channels around Metompkin island as the main channel has been silted in. Below is a shot of the view in Navionics. The channel here is totally silted in. Fortunately in the satellite view of the same spot, there is another smaller channel that looks deep and that’s the way Graham ultimately was able to get through. So far there have been enough fishing channels through the inner part of the marsh to continue North unimpeded and Graham may now be through the trickiest parts. Mileage is not too accurate since I’m not measuring through every twist and turn that he’s actually sailing. Graham reported his battery power was up back in the 77% range for SOC which is good. His 50 watt solar panel seems to be enough for his light use (chart plotter, cabin lights, anchor light, phone charging and occasional nav light). Day 13 (6/7)- Wallops Island to..... Graham checked in this morning. He had a great time sailing through the narrow channels yesterday. At one point he was escorted by a little fishing boat who directed him on which channel to take to make it through. He’s also had a few encounters with boaters who said, it’s too shallow or you’ll never make it. (very helpful). The one boater even came back to check on Graham last night convinced that he must be in trouble in some way but Graham assured him he was doing just fine. He enjoyed seeing some great flight displays from some Black Skimmers yesterday. Doing their thing in the shallow water. (photo from ourstate.com) Today he will sail by Wallops island which is a Nasa launch facility. There might even be a rocket on the pad since they have a lunch scheduled for a week from tomorrow. Graham does not plan to stick around although he’ll probably still be able to see it from further north. Wallops Island launch facility.
    2 points
  42. I built mine with the forward sliding hatch and we have been happy with it. It slides on starboard slides in pieces of B&B sail track. We have had it out in pretty rough weather and hasn’t leaked and it is large enough for me to wiggle through…….but Carol is the usual anchor deployment crew.
    2 points
  43. Amos, RIght on. I spoke with him earlier today and he said it got pretty sporty running wing and wing toward the entrance to the North River and he let his halyards go a bit and just let the sails slide down to reduce sail as it was too lumpy to reef properly and he was so close to being in the more sheltered river. He's been making great progress today with 2 reefs in the main and 1 in the mizzen earlier through Coinjock and he's trying to make as much progress toward the Chesapeake canal before the wind goes north. Even though this is a pleasure cruise it always feels like we're racing something
    2 points
  44. Last Saturday my daughter and I launched Skeena in St Michaels, MD and spent two nights aboard, sailing with 7 other boats, leaving Monday before the rain. Her are a few pics. Skeena was amazing. I continue to get used to her. I do plan on changing the hatch to a sliding one like Chick and Amos. I'll discuss this later. Getting to spend a couple of days with my daughter is always special. Before we spent time sailing we were in DC checking out law schools! I felt a little guilty having a cabin, but not too guilty...... We were all vaccinated. Yeah! There was very little our last day, but I had to try the mizzen staysail. About the time I got her out it started raining, so I never had time to play much....... Life's good. Let the summer begin!
    2 points
  45. The instructions for the centerboard pin was correct for the the mk3.1's. On the mk3.2 which you are building, the board was moved forward causing us to flip the pin as the cover plate hit the bunk top. On the mk3.2 we decided to give up on the detailed instructions and do more detailed plan sheets but we threw in the instructions anyway. We will look into the instructions correct them. It should not be a problem to back fill the hole. If you are you are concerned you could put a small glass patch over the hole on the outside. My preferred bumper is to turn the trunk upside down with the bottom edge of the bumper level. You need a temporary side and ends, then squirt in 100 percent silicone from your caulking gun until you reach the correct level. Put some mold release on the faces that will touch the silicone so that they can be removed. With this method you will have no fasteners that could leak into the trunk. I cut hardened silicone tubes into 1 1/4" slices and counterbore the center to take a washer. I use a large screw through the washer and screw the donut onto something stout for a great door stop. I have watched a heavy wind gust slam our big shop doors against my stop which has compressed to about half it's thickness absorbing all of that energy. It must be about 15 years old by now.
    2 points
  46. A car in the garage? How strange.
    2 points
  47. I have had some success removing (minimizing) runs and curtains by using a cabinet scrapper. Best done when the epoxy is hard enough but not to hard. Sandpaper is inclined to get the surface smooth but not necessarily flat. Best is not to leave the runs in the first place. Force yourself to apply the epoxy as thin as possible, but epoxy can be a little diabolical, waiting patiently until you are tired and have turned in for the evening to creep into a line or lump. Do as well as you can but, remember it is a boat and at some point it will not be in your living room. Speaking of which is your workshop connected to your living area. I looked again and did find isocyanates in your 2 pack paint. and the solvents like xylene are quite strong. I don't think you need to be concerned about odors being absorbed into the walls, but the boat will have a strong odor for at least a day or so. Do the paint mixing in an area of maximum ventilation, get brushes, rags, unused paint outside as soon as possible. Keep the little one away and good luck.
    2 points
  48. Well the worlds slowest build floats. Covid got me finishing a lot of projects. Launched and delighted. I think I failed to get the correct amount of rocker, it is sloooow to turn, but it tracks great:) Overall delighted. 80efb755-4da9-472e-833c-5f07f99b908a.MP4
    2 points
  49. Nothing beats looking at a hull that has been so tediously faired and sanded by someone else.
    2 points


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.