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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/19/2022 in Posts

  1. Here's my solution I stole from Graham. I put my sails in the cabin, and put these two spacers on the masts with the sprits on top. The bungy loops around the whole mess and holds the masts down and keeps the sprits secure.
    2 points
  2. Moment of truth today, peeled back the plywood. Looking pretty good I would say. A little messy around the edges in places but that will tidy up ok. There was one slight void left- that's the problem working blind- but I've filled that now. Very happy that the hull is level on either side of where it cracked. The crack at the foredeck was just a hairline on the outside, so I glassed that, and then decided to throw a bit of glass on the inside too. Not very proud of that particular bit, I should have sanded back a bigger area, but it hadn't actually cracked on the inside so in not too bothered. Next job is the stern, but it's blowing half a gale here and the boatyard is very dusty, so I'm going to take the test of today off...
    2 points
  3. It seems like a long time since there's been a new video of just plain sailing, so here's one with grandson and son-in-law, sailing CS 17 CarrieB on Mona Lake in Michigan as part of a family week. 20220804_150541.mp4
    2 points
  4. Be careful what you say, boat projects always take twice al long as you thought Looking good. Getting the hull fair would have been my biggest concern, and you seem to have made good there.
    1 point
  5. Don- Thanks for your compliment on Lula. The other part of the post attributed to me was wrong. I think it was a comment by someone else. Cheers, Ken
    1 point
  6. On Summer Breeze, I left the snotter attached and pulled it up tight to the mast, then a lashing around the clew end of the sprit firmly held them to the masts.
    1 point
  7. For Chessie I kept the sails bent to the sprits and had sail bags of Sunbrella made for each. They were easily lashed on the port-side cockpit seat. The mizzen assembly fit [on the seat] entirely within the cabin bulkhead and the transom. The bag for the mains’l and sprit was laid out with the luff and forward end of the sprit to aft. The sail bags were zippered and tapered for a loose fit and made smaller where the sprit extended beyond the sail’s luff. Only that part of the mains’l bag extended a little beyond the transom. Earlier I bagged the sails in a lightweight non waterproof material and stowed them in the cabin — with the sprits in a pair of cradles on top of the masts. I abandoned that when I had to de-rig in rain and stow throughly wet sail bags inside the cabin for road transport.
    1 point
  8. Today's progress: I've glassed both sides of the bow crack and screwed it all together with pieces of ply either side. It does mean working blind to some extent but I think it'll be ok. At the same time I injected the gunwale with firstly neat, then thickened, epoxy, and clamped it all together. There was another damaged area up by the foredeck, where a crack had appeared. Nothing had gone out of line so here I just glassed over the area inside and out.
    1 point
  9. I'm not crazy about the webbing strap for keeping the mast forward I think it will be too hard to keep it tight. I drew up a gate that would work and swing open. Some 1/8" aluminum scraps top and bottom through bolted through the cutout section make the swinging part. A couple of radiuses are made to allow it to swing open. I can send you a 1:1 paper template if you want to get the size.
    1 point
  10. The resistance at the bottom is because the plywood side is bent and the break is allowing it to return to being flat and unfair. I would try hard to force it back to where it was but it will take some pushing. Easiest might be to wedge a stick inside the boat pushing out about 6" or so in front of the vertical part of that break you can tap it in with a hammer to dial it in. Like such... So, dryfit that and once happy, squirt a bunch of glue in the crack. Wedge it back out the fillet and tape inside and filler in the holes and glass tape/cloth on the outside and should be good as new. From what I can see i think you're good on the gunwale cut. I think i'd jus fill that up with thickened epoxy and clamp it back together. For filling holes i'd use cabosil thickened epoxy. Micro fibers or (milled fibers) won't hurt but nasty to sand it if you have to. cabosil is good enough. Just don't use microspheres or microbaloons for anything but fairing ontop of the glass repairs.
    1 point
  11. I agree i would repair the crack in the side (aft seat tank area) first then the gunwale. That way also you can more easily run a hand saw up against the side of the hull when sawing into the gunwale crack. These days I pretty much always just lay my glass tape right onto my wet fillet right after I do it. You can wait a little while until it stiffens up but i'm too impatient. Once i have the joint ready to tape (in your case, sanded/ground and clean) I'd lay in my fillet, clean it up then mix my regular epoxy for the glass tape and paint a generous coat of epoxy above and below the fillet with the edge of my brush just grazing the edge of the fillet. If you're fillet mix is thick enough and stiff enough you can brush right over it gently. Then i lay the glass tape in and it immediately soaks up that coat. Then i brush on additional epoxy onto the glass tape and it usually doesn't' take much and it's done. If you put down too much epoxy and see runs just wipe your brush and wipe the excess up, repeat to remove some excess. Since you're doing repairs around paint i'd tape a piece of plastic like a bib under any repair area i work on when I do the repair so that if you do get an over excited drop of epoxy try to run down it won't leave a rude line of epoxy in the painted area. On the gunwale forward, there would be nothing practically wrong with adding a strip to the inside over the damage and as you said it would be covered. Personally I think it'd instead just put a couple of layers of glass tape on the inside running fore and aft along the top of the side panel adjacent the damaged area. You'll already have some glass there since the vertical panel crack goes all the way to the top but that would give a lot of good tensile strength to the inside of the panel to help out the gunwale which might not regain 100% of it's rigidity.
    1 point
  12. Alan, that video is a GREAT way to respond to Apher’s’ inquiry about his boat’s discouraging and awful-looking damage. I appreciate having viewed the video because it was understandable and clear — perhaps even a guy like me could make the repairs as described — and I found that your voice projected helpful confidence (as in “ this is more of a minor repair”.) Indeed, pictures/videos can be worth a thousand printed words. If I encounter a similar issue with my boats this video encourages me to try making the repair rather than “writhing” in despair. I, like Aphers, really appreciate B&B Yacht Designs and it’s wonderful support. And I’m having a BLAST using my little fleet of boats this year (CS15, CS17m3, and my ski boat — made from the ply and planks I purchased from you.) For instance, Don Silsbe accompanied me on my 17 ft. Avocet for a few days of sailing and overnights in Grand Traverse Bay (part of Lake Michigan). We planned for five days but we let go of the first and last days due to rain. I’m glad he was around to kinda guide me through the adventure. Good luck, Aphers, with what you decide to do with your Spindrift.
    1 point
  13. While the damage looks bad at first glance I agree with Graham. I think the repairs are all pretty simple and straightforward. Depending on how much you want it look exactly like it was this is a 2 or 3 day job at most plus some paint touchups. I tried doing a video reply hopefully this has some good suggestions for you. Let me know!
    1 point
  14. Well I only built it last year. Three months working every evening and weekend. Fitting the gunwales was a 2am job by the time we were finished. So yep I'm pretty attached to it. It's also about the only design of boat that will fit my yacht, due to limited deck space. I could take a pay out and buy a roll up inflatable. And then what do I do with my rig and foils. And how do I teach my son to sail. Not to mention no more sunset rowing trips around anchorages...
    1 point
  15. That’s a lot of work how much do you love this boat? I have made repairs to cracks that haven’t gotten to big by using small shims to force open the gap injecting epoxy with a syringe and needle you can get them at a feed store or farm supply then applying clamp pressure to close
    1 point
  16. That is bad luck. The good news is that you built it and it is made out of wood, you can fix each problem piece by piece until it is as good as new. The Catspaw that we have kept on our dock for the last 20 years was on the stern of a power boat at the leeward end of a marina when an new owner of a 36' sloop got embayed in strong winds and crashed into the dinghy. The owner was well reimbursed by the insurance company, he left her with me. Her condition was similar to yours. No one knows that it has been crashed. I just cut out the damaged ply parts and spliced new parts back in. That vertical break in the side looks easy to repair with a butt block. I would use a 4" wide piece of 6mm ply. The reason for such a wide piece is force the hull back to it's original fair shape and to give plenty of gluing surface. Butt blocks do not have to look ugly if clean up the edges nicely. You would need to a pair of clamping blocks on each side of the repair to force the hull fair while the glue dried. If you do not have a deep reach clamp you can screw right through everything to clamp it in place. The gunwale is a bit trickier. It is impossible to get glue to completely fill the crack along the gunwale to hull joint. I solve that by running a handsaw down that crack so that I can glue in a sliver of wood that is well epoxied. If there is damage to the wood in the gunwales, you will have to cut out the bad bits and scarf in new wood. Just use an 8:1 taper on your scarfs. You can also do taped joints, just use the same tape as you used on your chine joints. You must tape both sides of a repaired joints. Tape won't force the patch into a fair shape but you can use clamping boards to force the taped joint fair while the epoxy dries. Don't forget the plastic release film. I would not sweat perfection, you need honest strong. This is just the beginning of her chequered history. Good luck with the repair.
    1 point
  17. Great video, Reacher. As I told Ted over the weekend, thanks for getting the kids involved! Forgive the bluntness, but there are way too many old men sitting alone in their boats bemoaning that "kids these days" just want to be on screens. Invite a kid along with you the next time you go sailing! Well done!
    1 point
  18. If everything else is good you can push the two panels back together and start from their with the repair is it out of the question to make a butt block and attach it to the inside hull panel or as I had to do on my boat when I dropped a lead weight onto the hull while under construction and had to fix it I made it a single side repair but in your case it can be repaired from both sides pictures show how I made the fix hope this will help if you go ahead with this yourself
    1 point
  19. Having had the similar problem with auto crash (look I know it’s not a boat ) but the out come will probably be the same you will wish you had let the insurance company cover the repair because once you settle with the guy that hit you on a dollar value and get into the repair and it turns out to be c can of worms (no pun intended) your on the hook for what ever happens next not to mention the time you personally put in to make the repair and what if it can’t be saved. Take it to a boat yard and get some professional estimates that would be the way I would go about it mark p.s. It will save you a lot of headaches.
    1 point
  20. Pictures would help. How is the hull shape? If the damage has allowed the tortured into place plywood to move, it may not be even remotely a simple repair. If the shape is good, then glass/epoxy repairs might just do it.
    1 point
  21. Yes my S 10 mast is just over 17 feet in three sections. I don't have access to the plans but I think stock is three sections of aluminum, but you could do it a number of ways depending on storage or transport issues. Two sections of aluminum and douglas fir CP is good. I like Alan/Graham's idea of having the mast partner swing out of the way, then you could pivot the mast up and secure it by swinging the partner closed.
    1 point
  22. Here is a shot of the mast partner on the S12 here at the shop. Graham would know the story on it probably. It does not hinge like I thought but does allow for stepping the mast starting at the bottom and rotating it up so at least you don't have to balance it as high up in the air but perhaps not really worth it for an S11 with the lighter stock mast. This one has wing nuts underneath so would be a chore to open and close very often. We have never opened it.
    1 point
  23. Pete McCrary https://messing-about.com/forums/topic/12029-spindrift-10-1329-seabiscuit/page/3/ Lots of good info on a Spindrift check it out.
    1 point
  24. I think Alan's idea to install a FG tube between the upper mast partner and the mast step is good, might make the most improvement for the time and effort. My mast partner is too tight so it tends to bind unless I have it aligned just right. My S 10 mast weighs less than half of yours which I think could make a difference. The stock mast is constructed from three pieces of 6068? aluminum tubing which I think will ship UPS. The upper section of my mast is hollow birdsmouth but that is a lot of work for minimum weight saving. The most difficult part of constructing the stock mast is making the FG bushings to join the mast sections which are of decreasing size and I think will nest inside each other. I can not think of the gentleman from Northern Virginia who built a S 10 last year or so and has lots of good info.
    1 point
  25. Since you've already got a rig and sail that works I don't see why you should build a Spindrift mast to plan necessarily. I think you'll still have some difficulty stepping it alongside the mothership. I think what I would do is build and install a fiberglass tube or even use a PVC pipe to connect the top and bottom mast partners. It would not be load bearing under sail so it could just be slipped underneath the foredeck hole and over top of the existing mast step i.e. don't cut the foredeck hole larger to receive the pipe so as not to weaken it. Then you'd epoxy it in place and apply a fillet to the outside which should be strong enough to hold it in place if you get a bit off balance. You won't have to worry about landing the mast in the mast step. A fiberglass tube would be lighter and more elegant. If you scroll to the end of this video on how we make our glass tubes you'll see it being installed as a guide tube for the Core Sound 15 mizzen mast which serves the purpose i'm describing above. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JO_-sbbBRBM Another option would be to modify the foredeck partner with a removable section of the actual mast support collar specifically the aft half of the collar could be hinged to rotate 90 degrees and allow the mast to be set into the bottom step first and then rotated up into the top partner similar to a tabernacle action but with still some balancing required. Then with the mast vertical the aft section is rotated shut and a pin secures it. The S12 at our workshop actually has this setup I believe with an aluminum reinforcing plate top and bottom (i think) I can get another picture tomorrow but here is one from Graham's Trip to Sail Oklahoma in 2013 where you can just make out the aluminum part. andrewlinn.com/2013/131010_ok/03spin.jpg Of course a lighter mast would be easier. A balanced lug sail could be an option such as what we have on the Amanda dinghy but it will likely have lee helm with no change to the mast location. You want to try to keep the center of area of the sail as close to the designed location as you can.
    1 point
  26. It doesn't take much of a shop to build a Spindrift mast to plans.
    1 point
  27. Here's how my Ravenswood travels: Thule roof rack with "Stacker" and surf pads. Two straps, one at front of the coaming and one at the rear. Bow line attaches to a strap that is held by a bolt under the hood. Stern line attaches to the hook ring on the trailer hitch.
    1 point
  28. Update Aug. 1, 2022 at 6 PM Pacific time: We have completed the move to the new server, with some configuration items still to be finished. Please let me know in this thread if you see anything odd! ____________________________________________________________________________________ Older message: We will have a planned maintenance window within the next few days. I'll update this post when the date and time is fixed. During that time the forums will be closed. messing-about has been growing and we are moving to a new server. We are doubling our RAM and bandwidth to accommodate the growth. The new server also has 50% more processing power, and will be using all SSD drives for storage. The result should be a faster experience for you. The server move will require the forums to be paused, with no new posts allowed during the transfer time. This will take several hours due to the size of the forums, but should be completed within 24 hours once started. I want to thank all of the Supporting Members for helping make this move possible. Their support has been crucial to keeping messing-about online!
    1 point
  29. Still not enough wind to really sail, but motoring around a bit. Torqeedo sez….5.8kts can motor for 6.2 hours. Might been a little more if the solar panels were opened up! Still monkeying around with lazyjacks for the main….
    1 point
  30. I really liked the Short Shot too. I was planning to build two until I found that here was no short shot LV. 165 is on the line so it depends on how you plan to use it. If you’re going to load it, go bigger. If not, then maybe LV. If I were starting over with the knowledge I have now, I’d probably go with two LVs since we paddle pretty light. Btw, this is what Jeff said… HH
    1 point
  31. https://bandbyachtdesigns.com/ocracoke20b
    1 point
  32. Yup. Primer brings all the little flaws to the surface. Now, the real work begins. Total Fair is your new friend!
    1 point
  33. Rob, Congratulations. It is definitely a S10. It was built from scratch, not a kit but it looks like the builder did a good job. We will give you the plan sheets that you need to finish her off, just email or give us a call.
    1 point
  34. Busy day in the shop today made my steam generator so I could steam bend the forward end of the rub rail after 45min I took the bag off and the wood was soft enough to bend around the hull contur
    1 point

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